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1015 records – page 1 of 102.

8th Annual Toronto Critical Care Medicine Symposium, 30 October-1 November 2003, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181450
Source
Crit Care. 2004 Feb;8(1):58-66
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Jeff Granton
John Granton
Author Affiliation
Programme Director, Critical Care Medicine Programme, University of Toronto, Canada. john.Granton@uhn.on.ca
Source
Crit Care. 2004 Feb;8(1):58-66
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Blood Transfusion - adverse effects - utilization
Critical Care
Cross Infection - epidemiology
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Ontario - epidemiology
Respiration, Artificial
Sepsis - therapy
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - epidemiology
Terminal Care
Notes
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PubMed ID
14975048 View in PubMed
Less detail

[113 cases of cancer. A 10-year case material from general practice]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26767
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1984 May 10;104(13):886-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-1984
Author
M. Nylenna
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1984 May 10;104(13):886-90
Date
May-10-1984
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - diagnosis - therapy
Norway
Physicians, Family
Terminal Care
PubMed ID
6463977 View in PubMed
Less detail

A.A.R.N. position statement palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240083
Source
AARN News Lett. 1984 Oct;40(9):6-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1984
Source
AARN News Lett. 1984 Oct;40(9):6-7
Date
Oct-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Humans
Nursing Care
Palliative Care
Terminal Care
PubMed ID
6208741 View in PubMed
Less detail

Absorbing information about a child's incurable cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96768
Source
Oncology. 2010;78(3-4):259-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Patrizia Lannen
Joanne Wolfe
Jennifer Mack
Erik Onelov
Ullakarin Nyberg
Ulrika Kreicbergs
Author Affiliation
Phyllis F. Cantor Center, Boston, MA, USA.
Source
Oncology. 2010;78(3-4):259-66
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Death
Bereavement
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality - psychology
Parents
Professional-Family Relations
Questionnaires
Sweden
Terminal Care - methods
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
PURPOSE: To assess parents' ability to absorb information that their child's cancer was incurable and to identify factors associated with parents' ability to absorb this information. PATIENTS AND METHODS: An anonymous mail-in questionnaire study was performed as a population-based investigation in Sweden between August and October of 2001. 449 parents who lost a child to cancer 4-9 years earlier (response rate 80%) completed the survey. 191 (43%) of the bereaved parents were fathers and 251 (56%) were mothers. RESULTS: Sixty percent of parents (n = 258) reported that they were able to absorb the information that their child's illness was incurable. Parents were better able to absorb this information when the information was given in an appropriate manner (RR 1.6; CI 1.3-2.0), when they shared their problems with others during the child's illness course (RR 1.4; CI 1.1-1.8) and when they had no history of depression (RR 1.3; CI 1.0-1.8). Parents who reported that they were able to absorb the information were more likely to have expressed their farewells to the child in their desired manner (RR 1.3; CI 1.0-1.5). CONCLUSIONS: Parents who received information that their child's illness was incurable in an appropriate manner are more likely to absorb that information. Whether or not parents are able to absorb the information that their child's cancer is incurable has implications in terms of preparation for the child's impending death.
PubMed ID
20523086 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A butterfly against the light--nursing and care for the dying in Vidar Hospital].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229234
Source
Fag Tidsskr Sykepleien. 1990 Apr 30;78(3):21-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-30-1990
Author
I. Nerdrum
Source
Fag Tidsskr Sykepleien. 1990 Apr 30;78(3):21-3
Date
Apr-30-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthroposophy
Hospitals, Special
Humans
Sweden
Terminal Care
PubMed ID
2361118 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to outreach specialist palliative care teams among cancer patients in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114285
Source
J Palliat Med. 2013 Aug;16(8):951-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Mette Asbjoern Neergaard
Anders Bonde Jensen
Frede Olesen
Peter Vedsted
Author Affiliation
The Palliative Team, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. mettneer@rm.dk
Source
J Palliat Med. 2013 Aug;16(8):951-7
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Community-Institutional Relations
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasms - physiopathology - therapy
Palliative Care - manpower - organization & administration
Patient Care Team - organization & administration - standards
Registries
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Specialization
Terminal Care - manpower - organization & administration
Young Adult
Abstract
Equal access to end-of-life care is important. However, social inequality has been found in relation to place-of-death. The question is whether social and economic factors play a role in access to specialist palliative care services.
The study analyzed the association between access to outreach specialist palliative care teams (SPCTs) and socioeconomic characteristics of Danish cancer patients who died of their cancer.
The study was a population-based, cross-sectional register study. We identified 599 adults who had died of cancer from March 1 to November 30, 2006, in Aarhus County, Denmark. Data from health registers were retrieved and linked based on the unique personal identifier number.
Multivariate analysis with adjustment for age, gender, and general practitioner (GP) involvement showed a higher probability of contact with an SPCT among immigrants and descendants of immigrants than among people of Danish origin (prevalence ratio [PR]: 1.55; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04;2.31) and among married compared to unmarried patients (PR: 1.25; 95% CI: 1.01;1.54). The trends were most marked among women.
We found an association between females, married patients, and female immigrants and their descendants and access to an SPCT in Denmark. However, no association with the examined economic factor was found. Need for specialized health care, which is supposed to be the main reason for access to an SPCT, may be related to economic imbalance; and despite the relative equality found, SPCT access may not be equal for all Danish residents. Further research into social and economic consequences in palliative care services is warranted.
PubMed ID
23631614 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accompanying the dying patient--the doctor's role.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219663
Source
CHAC Rev. 1993;21(3):14-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
Y. Bureau
Source
CHAC Rev. 1993;21(3):14-7
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Physician's Role
Physician-Patient Relations
Terminal Care - psychology - standards
Abstract
Yvon Bureau, president of the "Responsable jusqu'à la fin" foundation, spoke at the annual congress of the Quebec section of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. A social worker, Bureau spoke as if he were a doctor and asked some important questions as to what would be his relationship to his patient. His insights can be applied to anyone who works with those who are dying or terminally ill.
PubMed ID
10131027 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active anticancer treatment during the final month of life in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105023
Source
Anticancer Res. 2014 Feb;34(2):1015-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Carsten Nieder
Terje Tollåli
Astrid Dalhaug
Ellinor Haukland
Gro Aandahl
Adam Pawinski
Jan Norum
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Nordland Hospital, P.O. Box 1480, 8092 Bodø, Norway. carsten.nieder@nlsh.no.
Source
Anticancer Res. 2014 Feb;34(2):1015-20
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - economics - pathology - therapy
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Logistic Models
Lung Neoplasms - economics - pathology - therapy
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Retrospective Studies
Terminal Care - economics - methods - utilization
Abstract
Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a major cause of cancer-related death and consumption of healthcare resources worldwide. Significant costs are generated shortly before death, partly because of continued oncological treatment during the terminal stage of disease. We analyzed factors predicting for the likelihood of active anticancer therapy during the final month of life. Patients who died from NSCLC (any stage and treatment) during the years 2006-2013 within a defined geographical region of northern Norway were included (n=266). Out of these, 28.6% received oncological treatment during the final month of life. Hospital death occurred in 70% of patients who received active treatment during their last month of life, compared to 41% of other patients (p=0.0001). Multivariate analysis showed that lack of documented resuscitation preference (p=0.001) and the presence of superior vena cava compression (p=0.039) were the most important predictors of active therapy during the last month of life. Trends were observed with regard to use of steroids for symptom palliation (p=0.067) and advanced T stage (p=0.071). Given that patients with documented resuscitation preference before their last month of life (typically a do not resuscitate order) were unlikely to receive active treatment during the final month (2% versus 35% in patients without documented preference), early discussion of prognosis, options for symptom control and resuscitation preference are crucial components in strategies for improving terminal care.
PubMed ID
24511048 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Acute myelogenous leukemia. When the choice is between a good and a bad death]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26417
Source
Sykepleien. 1986 Jan 24;73(2):23-5, 29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-24-1986

1015 records – page 1 of 102.