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Perturbation of seafloor bacterial community structure by drilling waste discharge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294566
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Apr; 129(2):615-622
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Tan T Nguyen
Sabine K J Cochrane
Bjarne Landfald
Author Affiliation
Norwegian College of Fishery Science, Faculty of Biosciences, Fisheries and Economics, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Breivika, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Apr; 129(2):615-622
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Clostridiales - drug effects - isolation & purification
Deltaproteobacteria - drug effects - isolation & purification
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Geologic Sediments - chemistry - microbiology
Microbial Consortia - drug effects - genetics
Norway
Oceans and Seas
Oil and Gas Fields
Tenericutes - drug effects - isolation & purification
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Abstract
Offshore drilling operations result in the generation of drill cuttings and localized smothering of the benthic habitats. This study explores bacterial community changes in the in the upper layers of the seafloor resulting from an exploratory drilling operation at 1400m water depth on the Barents Sea continental slope. Significant restructurings of the sediment microbiota were restricted to the sampling sites notably affected by the drilling waste discharge, i.e. at 30m and 50m distances from the drilling location, and to the upper 2cm of the seafloor. Three bacterial groups, the orders Clostridiales and Desulfuromonadales and the class Mollicutes, were almost exclusively confined to the upper two centimeters at 30m distance, thereby corroborating an observed increase in anaerobicity inflicted by the drilling waste deposition. The potential of these phylogenetic groups as microbial bioindicators of the spatial extent and persistence of drilling waste discharge should be further explored.
PubMed ID
29100637 View in PubMed
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