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Association of symptoms and signs of TM disorders in an adult population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230690
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1989 Jun;17(3):150-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1989
Author
D. Locker
G. Slade
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1989 Jun;17(3):150-3
Date
Jun-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dislocations - diagnosis
Female
Humans
Male
Mandible - physiopathology
Masticatory Muscles - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pain
Palpation
Sound
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Abstract
Most population-based studies of TM disorders report a discrepancy between the frequency of symptoms and the frequency of signs of functional disturbances of the temporomandibular joint. In addition, studies have reported varying relationships between subjectively perceived symptoms and signs found on clinical examination. This study examines this relationship in 148 Canadian adults who were part of a larger sample of 677 subjects who completed a telephone administered symptom questionnaire. Symptoms were reported by 63.5% and signs were found in 88.1%. While a degree of discordance was observed, there was a close and statistically significant association between symptoms and signs. This was the case whether summary variables or individual symptoms and signs were used as the dependent variable and whether proportions with or absolute numbers of symptoms and signs were examined. The validity of the symptom questionnaire was examined in order to assess its ability to identify "cases" of TMD. Validity tests showed a sensitivity of 81.4% and a specificity of 48.3%. When "false" positives and "true" positives were compared, the former were found to be significantly less likely to report pain.
PubMed ID
2736896 View in PubMed
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Clinical signs of temporomandibular joint internal derangement in adults. An epidemiologic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225283
Source
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1991 Dec;72(6):637-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1991
Author
H. Lundh
P L Westesson
Author Affiliation
Department of Stomatognathic Physiology, University of Lund School of Dentistry, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1991 Dec;72(6):637-41
Date
Dec-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cartilage, Articular - physiopathology
Dislocations - diagnosis - physiopathology
Facial Pain - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Range of Motion, Articular
Sound
Sweden - epidemiology
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Abstract
This study investigated the frequency and distribution of clinical signs of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangement in an adult non-TMJ patient population. Four hundred three persons who participated in an epidemiologic investigation were examined for clinical signs of TMJ internal derangement by four examiners who followed a standardized form. Clinical signs of internal derangement were found in 76 persons (19%). Twenty-nine persons (7%) had reciprocal clicking and 47 (12%) had a history of clicking replaced by limitation of mouth opening with deviation to the affected side. Reciprocal clicking was associated with TMJ pain during mouth opening and with limitation of jaw movement. A history of clicking replaced by limitation of mouth opening with deviation to the affected side was associated with pain during mouth opening, limitation of opening, and palpatory tenderness of the TMJ. The study indicates that clinical signs of TMJ internal derangement are present in nearly one fifth of non-TMJ patients. Those with clinical signs of internal derangement frequently also have subjective symptoms but they have not sought treatment for these symptoms.
PubMed ID
1812441 View in PubMed
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Screening for functional disorders of the masticatory system among teenagers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37475
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1990 Dec;18(6):281-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1990
Author
L. Nielsen
S. Terp
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthodontics, Royal Dental College, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1990 Dec;18(6):281-7
Date
Dec-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Movement
Palpation
Physical Examination
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Sound
Stomatognathic Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Abstract
This study evaluated the efficiency of a questionnaire as compared to a brief clinical examination for identification of clinically assessed craniomandibular disorder cases. 706 Danish children 14-16 yr old answered a self-administered questionnaire concerned with dysfunction symptoms and oral habits. In addition they were subjected to a clinical examination of signs of dysfunction from the masticatory system. Based on the present study a self-administered questionnaire for screening purposes used in an a priori healthy population of teenagers cannot be recommended. The answers to the questionnaire showed a low reproducibility and their ability to predict clinically assessed signs of dysfunction was inadequate. The most favorable combinations of single questions were calculated in order to optimize sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of the questionnaire. A maximum of 65% of the clinically diseased subjects were identified by the questionnaire and only 41% of the test positive subjects had their subjective diagnoses confirmed at the clinical examination. The brief clinical screening procedure succeeded in identifying 92% of children with severely disturbed function. The subjects testing positively according to the brief clinical examination were children with either moderate or severe disturbances except for only one case. Based on a cost to benefit consideration a brief clinical examination is preferred to a self-administered questionnaire as a routine procedure for detection of craniomandibular disorders.
PubMed ID
2090378 View in PubMed
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Signs and symptoms of craniomandibular disorders in a series of Finnish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235397
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1987 Apr;45(2):109-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1987
Author
M. Könönen
M. Nyström
E. Kleemola-Kujala
M. Kataja
M. Evälahti
P. Laine
L. Peck
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1987 Apr;45(2):109-14
Date
Apr-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Dental Occlusion
Dental Occlusion, Traumatic - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Facial Pain - diagnosis
Female
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mandible - physiology
Movement
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Abstract
The prevalences of subjective symptoms and clinical signs of craniomandibular (CM) disorders, orofacial parafunctions, and occlusal conditions were determined in a series of Finnish children (n = 166). All were first interviewed, and then 156 of them were examined clinically. Fifty-two per cent of the children reported at least one subjective symptom, and 75% at least one parafunctional habit. Clinical signs were common but rarely severe in accordance with Helkimo's clinical dysfunction index (Di). Both the number of subjective symptoms (p less than 0.001) and the number of orofacial parafunctions (p less than 0.05) correlated with the clinical dysfunction index.
PubMed ID
3474855 View in PubMed
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