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2343 records – page 1 of 235.

The 1.9 A crystal structure of heat-labile shrimp alkaline phosphatase.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189601
Source
J Mol Biol. 2002 May 17;318(5):1265-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-17-2002
Author
Maaike de Backer
Sean McSweeney
Hanne B Rasmussen
Bjørn W Riise
Peter Lindley
Edward Hough
Author Affiliation
European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France.
Source
J Mol Biol. 2002 May 17;318(5):1265-74
Date
May-17-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alkaline Phosphatase - chemistry
Animals
Crystallography, X-Ray
Decapoda (Crustacea) - chemistry - enzymology
Humans
Models, Molecular
Protein Conformation
Temperature
Abstract
Alkaline phosphatases are non-specific phosphomonoesterases that are distributed widely in species ranging from bacteria to man. This study has concentrated on the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase from arctic shrimps (shrimp alkaline phosphatase, SAP). Originating from a cold-active species, SAP is thermolabile and is used widely in vitro, e.g. to dephosphorylate DNA or dNTPs, since it can be inactivated by a short rise in temperature. Since alkaline phosphatases are zinc-containing enzymes, a multiwavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) experiment was performed on the zinc K edge, which led to the determination of the structure to a resolution of 1.9 A. Anomalous data clearly showed the presence of a zinc triad in the active site, whereas alkaline phosphatases usually contain two zinc and one magnesium ion per monomer. SAP shares the core, an extended beta-sheet flanked by alpha-helices, and a metal triad with the currently known alkaline phosphatase structures (Escherichia coli structures and a human placental structure). Although SAP lacks some features specific for the mammalian enzyme, their backbones are very similar and may therefore be typical for other higher organisms. Furthermore, SAP possesses a striking feature that the other structures lack: surface potential representations show that the enzyme's net charge of -80 is distributed such that the surface is predominantly negatively charged, except for the positively charged active site. The negatively charged substrate must therefore be directed strongly towards the active site. It is generally accepted that optimization of the electrostatics is one of the characteristics related to cold-adaptation. SAP demonstrates this principle very clearly.
PubMed ID
12083516 View in PubMed
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The 3-year follow-up study in a block of flats - experiences in the use of the Finnish indoor climate classification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185305
Source
Indoor Air. 2003 Jun;13(2):136-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
M. Tuomainen
A. Tuomainen
J. Liesivuori
A-L Pasanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Kuopio, Finland. marja.tuomainen@hengitysliitto.fi
Source
Indoor Air. 2003 Jun;13(2):136-47
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air pollution, indoor
Allergens - analysis
Ammonia - analysis
Asthma - prevention & control
Bacteria
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Construction Materials - standards
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Housing - standards
Humans
Humidity
Questionnaires
Spores, Fungal
Temperature
Abstract
Indoor climate of two new blocks of flats was investigated. The case building was built for people with respiratory diseases by following the instructions of the Finnish Classification of Indoor Climate, Construction and Finishing Materials, while the control building was built using conventional building technology. The main indoor air parameters (temperature, relative humidity and levels of CO, CO2, ammonia, total volatile organic compounds, total suspended particles, fungal spores, bacteria and cat, dog and house dust mite allergens) were measured in six apartments of both the buildings on five occasions during the 3-year occupancy. In addition, a questionnaire to evaluate symptoms of the occupants and their satisfaction with their home environment was conducted in connection with indoor air quality (IAQ) measurements. The levels of indoor air pollutants in the case building were, in general, lower than those in the control building. In addition, the asthmatic occupants informed that their symptoms had decreased during the occupancy in the case building. This case study showed that high IAQ is possible to reach by careful design, proper materials and equipment and on high-quality construction with reasonable additional costs. In addition, the study indicated that good IAQ can also be maintained during the occupancy, if sufficient information on factors affecting IAQ and guidance on proper use and care of equipment are available for occupants.
PubMed ID
12756007 View in PubMed
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35 years of marine natural product research in Sweden: Cool molecules and models from cold waters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283493
Source
Prog Mol Subcell Biol. 2017;55:1-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Lars Bohlin
Paco Cárdenas
Anders Backlund
Ulf Göransson
Source
Prog Mol Subcell Biol. 2017;55:1-34
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Aquatic Organisms - chemistry - genetics
Biological Products - chemistry - therapeutic use
Biomedical Research - trends
Cold Temperature
Marine Biology - trends
Oceans and Seas
Porifera - chemistry - genetics
Sweden
Technology, Pharmaceutical - trends
Abstract
Currents efforts in marine biodiscovery have essentially focused on temperate to tropical shallow water organisms. With more than 6000 species of marine plants and animals, the Kosterfjord area has the richest marine biodiversity in Swedish waters, but it remains understudied. The overall objective of our marine pharmacognosy research is to explore and reveal the pharmacological potential of organisms from this poorly explored region. More generally, we wish to understand aspects of structure-activity relationships of chemical interactions in cold-water marine environment (shallow and deep). Our strategy is based on ecologically guided search for compounds through studies of physiology and organism interactions coupled to identification of bioactive molecules guided by especially in vivo assays. The research programme originated in the beginning of the 1980s with a broad screening of Swedish marine organisms using both in vitro and in vivo assays, resulting in isolation and identification of several different bioactive molecules. Two congenerous cyclopeptides, i.e. barettin and 8,9-dihydrobarettin, were isolated from the deep-sea sponge Geodia barretti, and structurally elucidated, guided by their antifouling activity and their affinity to a selection of human serotonin receptors. To optimize the activity a number of analogues of barettin were synthezised and tested for antifouling activity. Within the EU project BlueGenics, two larger homologous peptides, barrettides A and B, were isolated from G. baretti. Also, metabolic fingerprinting combined with sponge systematics was used to further study deep-sea natural product diversity in the genus Geodia. Finally, the chemical property space model 'ChemGPS-NP' has been developed and used in our research group, enabling a more efficient use of obtained compounds and exploration of possible biological activities and targets. Another approach is the broad application of phylogenetic frameworks, which can be used in prediction of where-in which organisms-to search for novel molecules or better sources of known molecules in marine organisms. In a further perspective, the deeper understanding of evolution and development of life on Earth can also provide answers to why marine organisms produce specific molecules.
PubMed ID
28238034 View in PubMed
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'1001' Campylobacters: cultural characteristics of intestinal campylobacters from man and animals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245183
Source
J Hyg (Lond). 1980 Dec;85(3):427-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1980
Author
M B Skirrow
J. Benjamin
Source
J Hyg (Lond). 1980 Dec;85(3):427-42
Date
Dec-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Campylobacter - cytology - drug effects - isolation & purification
Cattle - microbiology
Culture Media
Dogs - microbiology
Humans
Intestines - microbiology
Metronidazole - pharmacology
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Swine - microbiology
Temperature
Abstract
The cultural characteristics of 1220 Campylobacter strains from a variety of sources are described. Forty-two were identified as Campylobacter fetus ssp. fetus (Véron & Chatelain, 1973), 1120 as members of the C. jejuni/C. coli group, and 58 did not conform to any known description. Sixteen of the latter strains had the basic characteristics of C. fetus but were atypical in certain other respects. The other 42 strains had the thermophilic characteristics of the jejuni/coli group, but were resistant to nalidixic acid and had other features in common; it is possible that they represent a new species. They were isolated from 19% of locally caught wild seagulls but only occasionally from other animals and man.Growth at 25 degrees C clearly distinguished strains of C. fetus from those of the jejuni/coli and the nalidixic acid-resistant thermophilic (NARTC) groups. Maximum growth temperature was less reliable for this purpose, and 43 degrees C was found to be better than the traditional 42 degrees C. By arranging the results of three tests (tolerance to 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride, growth at 30.5 and 45.5 degrees C) serially in the form of a schema comprising nine categories, the jejuni/coli strains fell into two main groups resembling the Institute Pasteur C. jejuni and C. coli type strains, but these groups could not be clearly defined owing to the existence of strains with intermediate characteristics.Most of the strains from cattle resembled C. jejuni, whereas those from pigs resembled C. coli; poultry strains occupied a more intermediate position. Strains from man and other animals were of mixed types, but most human strains resembled C. jejuni rather than C. coli. The type distribution pattern that most nearly matched that of human indigenous strains was given by a half-and-half mixture of strains from cattle and poultry.
Notes
Cites: J Pediatr. 1973 Mar;82(3):493-54572934
Cites: Br Med J. 1977 Jul 2;2(6078):9-11871765
Cites: Can J Microbiol. 1977 Sep;23(9):1311-371191
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1978 Jul;8(1):36-41670386
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1978 Oct;14(4):553-6718153
Cites: Can J Microbiol. 1979 Jan;25(1):1-7427650
Cites: Can J Microbiol. 1979 Jan;25(1):8-16218715
Cites: Vet Rec. 1979 Oct 6;105(14):333117609
Cites: Br Med J. 1980 May 31;280(6227):1301-27388519
Cites: J Bacteriol. 1953 Jul;66(1):24-613069461
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1957 Sep-Oct;101(2):119-2813475869
PubMed ID
7462593 View in PubMed
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[Ability of opportunistic enterobacteria to adapt to different temperatures].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150831
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2009 Mar-Apr;(2):15-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu A Markova
L A Belovezhets
I Iu Barov
E D Savilov
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2009 Mar-Apr;(2):15-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Cellulase - biosynthesis
Citrobacter freundii - metabolism - pathogenicity - physiology
Gibberellins - metabolism
Humans
Indoleacetic Acids - metabolism
Lipase - metabolism
Morganella morganii - metabolism - pathogenicity - physiology
Proteus mirabilis - metabolism - pathogenicity - physiology
Temperature
Abstract
To study variability of enzymatic apparatus of opportunistic enterobacteria.
Clinical strains of Morganella morganii, Citrobacter freundii, Proteus mirabilis isolated from patients treated in Irkutsk Regional Hospital for Infectious Diseases. Activity of cellulase and lipase as well as amount of auxins and gibberellins was studied in these bacteria at different cultivation temperatures.
It was shown that studied species isolated from humans enterobacteria are able to produce plant growth regulators amount of which depends from cultivation temperature and type of microorganism. Activity of cellulase sharply rises if temperature falls.
Obtained results show high adaptation potential of opportunistic bacteria from Enterobacteriaceae family. Switch on saprophytic mechanism after fall of temperature to environment-corresponding values allows them to survive in soil and arrange different interactions with soil biota including plants.
PubMed ID
19459471 View in PubMed
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About the neurohumoral mechanism of adaptation to the effect of a sublow temperature

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85303
Source
Pages 207 in International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 4th, Novosibirsk, USSR, 2-7 October. Scientific and Technical Progress and Circumpolar Health. Vol. 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
  1 website  
Author
V.V. Aristova, V.A. Bersenev, S.P. Borisova, S.N. Ignatyeva, E.V. Karpova, E.V. Rekhatsheva, L.N. Strezhneva, Yu. R. Tedder
Author Affiliation
Arkhangelsk, USSR
Source
Pages 207 in International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 4th, Novosibirsk, USSR, 2-7 October. Scientific and Technical Progress and Circumpolar Health. Vol. 1.
Date
1978
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
neurohumoral mechanism sublow temperature
Online Resources
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About the strains caused by a marathon race to fitness joggers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250080
Source
J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 1977 Mar;17(1):49-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1977

Absenteeism and respiratory disease among children and adults in Helsinki in relation to low-level air pollution and temperature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228944
Source
Environ Res. 1990 Jun;52(1):34-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
A. Pönkä
Author Affiliation
Helsinki City Health Department, Finland.
Source
Environ Res. 1990 Jun;52(1):34-46
Date
Jun-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Cold Temperature
Epidemiologic Methods
Finland
Humans
Infant
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects - analysis
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects - analysis
Urban health
Abstract
The weekly changes in ambient sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and temperature were compared with the figures for respiratory infection in children and adults and for absenteeism from day-care centers (DCC), schools, and workplaces during a 1-year period in Helsinki. The annual average level of sulfur dioxide was 21 micrograms/m3 and of nitrogen dioxide 47 micrograms/m3; the average temperature was +3.1 degrees C. The levels of these pollutants and the temperature were significantly correlated with the number of upper respiratory infections reported from health centers. Low temperature also correlated with increased frequency of acute tonsillitis, of lower respiratory tract infection among DCC children, and of absenteeism from day-care centers, schools and workplaces. Furthermore, a significant association was found between levels of sulfur dioxide and absenteeism. After statistical standardization for temperature, no other correlations were observed apart from that between high levels of sulfur dioxide and numbers of upper respiratory tract infections diagnosed at health centers (P = 0.04). When the concentrations of sulfur dioxide were above the mean, the frequency of the upper respiratory tract infections was 15% higher than that during the periods of low concentration. The relative importance of the effects of low-level air pollution and low temperature on health is difficult to assess.
PubMed ID
2351127 View in PubMed
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The absorption of calcium, iron and vitamin B12 during alterations in environmental temperature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297206
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical note TN-62-10
Publication Type
Report
Date
May 1963
Author
Chow, Bacon F.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical note TN-62-10
Date
May 1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Humans
Diet
Calcium
Vitamin B12
Iron
Cold Temperature
Hot Temperature
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2343 records – page 1 of 235.