Skip header and navigation

Refine By

2368 records – page 1 of 237.

Heat exchanges of nude men in the cold: effect of humidity, temperature and wind-speed.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293827
Source
Journal of Applied Physiology. 1958 May; 12(3):351-356.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1958
Author
Iampietro, P.F.
Bass, D.E.
Buskirk, E.R.
Source
Journal of Applied Physiology. 1958 May; 12(3):351-356.
Date
1958
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body temperature
Hot Temperature
Humans
Humidity
Male
Temperature
Wind
Cold Temperature
PubMed ID
13525291 View in PubMed
Less detail

Air temperatures in respiratory tracts of resting subjects in cold.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293841
Source
Journal of Applied Physiology. 1951 Nov; 4(5):378-382.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1951
Author
Webb, P.
Source
Journal of Applied Physiology. 1951 Nov; 4(5):378-382.
Date
1951
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body temperature
Cold Temperature
Humans
Repiratory system
Temperature
PubMed ID
14938268 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Journal of Applied Physiology. 1957 Mar; 10(2):231-234.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1957
Author
Scholander, P.F.
Anderson, K.L.
Krog, J.
Lorentzen, F.V.
Steen, J.
Source
Journal of Applied Physiology. 1957 Mar; 10(2):231-234.
Date
1957
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body temperature
Temperature
PubMed ID
13428651 View in PubMed
Less detail

Investigating changes in mortality attributable to heat and cold in Stockholm, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296014
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 2018 Sep; 62(9):1777-1780
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2018
Author
Daniel Oudin Åström
Kristie L Ebi
Ana Maria Vicedo-Cabrera
Antonio Gasparrini
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, 90187, Umeå, Sweden. Daniel.oudin.astrom@umu.se.
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 2018 Sep; 62(9):1777-1780
Date
Sep-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cold Temperature
Forecasting
Hot Temperature
Humans
Mortality - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Temperature
Abstract
Projections of temperature-related mortality rely upon exposure-response relationships using recent data. Analyzing long historical data and trends may extend knowledge of past and present impacts that may provide additional insight and improve future scenarios. We collected daily mean temperatures and daily all-cause mortality for the period 1901-2013 for Stockholm County, Sweden, and calculated the total attributable fraction of mortality due to non-optimal temperatures and quantified the contribution of cold and heat. Total mortality attributable to non-optimal temperatures varied between periods and cold consistently had a larger impact on mortality than heat. Cold-related attributable fraction (AF) remained stable over time whereas heat-related AF decreased. AF on cold days remained stable over time, which may indicate that mortality during colder months may not decline as temperatures increase in the future. More research is needed to enhance estimates of burdens related to cold and heat in the future.
Notes
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2009 Feb;33(2):245-51 PMID 18799511
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2016 Jun;124(6):740-4 PMID 26566270
Cites: J Stat Softw. 2011 Jul;43(8):1-20 PMID 22003319
Cites: Epidemiology. 2013 Nov;24(6):820-9 PMID 24051892
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2011 Dec;119(12):1681-90 PMID 21816703
Cites: Int J Biometeorol. 2003 May;47(3):166-75 PMID 12687450
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Jul 1;164(1):77-84 PMID 16624968
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2014 Apr 23;14:55 PMID 24758509
Cites: Epidemiology. 2009 Jul;20(4):575-83 PMID 19295435
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2015 Jul;123(7):659-64 PMID 25803836
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2018 Mar;616-617:703-709 PMID 29103641
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2014 Jul;68(7):641-8 PMID 24493740
Cites: Environ Int. 2018 Feb;111:239-246 PMID 29272855
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Dec 21;15(1): PMID 29267204
Cites: Lancet Planet Health. 2017 Dec;1(9):e360-e367 PMID 29276803
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 Oct 31;11(11):11371-83 PMID 25365060
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Nov;111(14):1712-8 PMID 14594620
Cites: Lancet. 2015 Jul 25;386(9991):369-75 PMID 26003380
PubMed ID
29748912 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fine-scale processes regulate the response of extreme events to global climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95770
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Nov 1;102(44):15774-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2005
Author
Diffenbaugh Noah S
Pal Jeremy S
Trapp Robert J
Giorgi Filippo
Author Affiliation
Purdue Climate Change Research Center and Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Purdue University, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-5201, USA. diffenbaugh@purdue.edu
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Nov 1;102(44):15774-8
Date
Nov-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate
Cold Temperature
Geography
Hot Temperature
Rain
Snow
Temperature
United States
Abstract
We find that extreme temperature and precipitation events are likely to respond substantially to anthropogenically enhanced greenhouse forcing and that fine-scale climate system modifiers are likely to play a critical role in the net response. At present, such events impact a wide variety of natural and human systems, and future changes in their frequency and/or magnitude could have dramatic ecological, economic, and sociological consequences. Our results indicate that fine-scale snow albedo effects influence the response of both hot and cold events and that peak increases in extreme hot events are amplified by surface moisture feedbacks. Likewise, we find that extreme precipitation is enhanced on the lee side of rain shadows and over coastal areas dominated by convective precipitation. We project substantial, spatially heterogeneous increases in both hot and wet events over the contiguous United States by the end of the next century, suggesting that consideration of fine-scale processes is critical for accurate assessment of local- and regional-scale vulnerability to climate change.
PubMed ID
16236722 View in PubMed
Less detail

Use of human body temperatures for clothing evaluation

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102180
Source
Pages 325-328 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
• lltdical Research tlli.53 Slipp/. 2. pp. 325-328, 1994 Use of Human Body Temperatures for Clothing Evaluation . .\Md PAsche SM'EF UNIMED, Trondheim, Norway Abstract: Experience shows that clothing manufacturers in their development work base their evaluation of the thermal properties of
  1 document  
Author
PÃ¥sche, A
Pasche, A
Author Affiliation
SINTEF UNIMED, Trondheim, Norway
Source
Pages 325-328 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Body temperature
Core temperature
Clothing
Criteria
Immersion suits
International Maritime Organization (IMO)
Rectal temperature
Skin temperature
Thermal properties
Abstract
Experience shows that clothing manufacturers in their development work base their evaluation of the thermal properties of the clothing, in particular for survival systems, on the changes observed in human core temperatures. Body core temperatures of human test subjects are frequently used to evaluate the thermal protection provided by specific clothing. For survival suits, or immersion suits, international acceptance criteria are based on the changes occurring in a human test subject's core temperature. Unfortunately the core temperature changes observed in test persons in connection with thermal property tests of clothing garments may not necessarily reflect the real thermal quality of the garment. For a comparison test between several suits or garments, performed within a limited time period, the core temperatures may actually be misleading. In a suit providing less insulation, the human test subject is likely to be shivering more and producing more heat. The increased metabolic heat may compensate fully for the higher heat loss from the suit, and no difference would be seen in core (rectal) temperatures. Evaluation of the thermal protection provided by a specific garment should be based on other parameters than only core temperature. Skin temperatures and oxygen consumption should be included in the test criteria.
Documents
Less detail

[Human thermal state during the cold period of the year in the central belt of Siberia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248723
Source
Gig Sanit. 1978 Apr;(4):22-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1978

Some effects of body heating prior to extreme cooling.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297270
Source
Alaskan Air Command. Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report 61-27.
Publication Type
Report
Date
October 1961
LIBRARY, ANCHORAGE. Af< ABSTRACT This study was performed to determine the effect of body heating prior to extreme cooling. Subjects were heated in a 42° C water bath until heart rates reached 150 beats/minute or rectal temperatures reached 39. 5° C. Subjects were exposed, following heating, to
  1 document  
Author
Barnett, Paul W.
Author Affiliation
Department of Protective Equipment, Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory
Source
Alaskan Air Command. Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report 61-27.
Date
October 1961
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
796117
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Humans
Cold Temperature
Body temperature
Abstract
This study was performed to determine the effect of body heating prior to extreme cooling. Subjects were heated in a 42° C water bath until heart rates reached 150 beats/minute or rectal temperatures reached 39. 5° C. Subjects were exposed, following heating, to ambient air temperatures of 0° C for 30 minutes and -15° C for 60 minutes. No significant change in tolerance times was noted. Total body heating prior to exposure is an ineffective means of extending the human body's tolerance to extreme cold. A discussion of the results is presented.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.61-27
Documents
Less detail

Heat transfer coefficient: Medivance Arctic Sun Temperature Management System vs. water immersion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158284
Source
Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2008 Jul;25(7):531-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
M J English
T M Hemmerling
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Department of Anesthesiology, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. mike.english@mac.com
Source
Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2008 Jul;25(7):531-7
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Temperature - physiology
Durable Medical Equipment - standards
Female
Hot Temperature - therapeutic use
Humans
Immersion
Male
Skin Temperature - physiology
Temperature
Water
Abstract
To improve heat transfer, the Medivance Arctic Sun Temperature Management System (Medivance, Inc., Louisville, CO, USA) features an adhesive, water-conditioned, highly conductive hydrogel pad for intimate skin contact. This study measured and compared the heat transfer coefficient (h), i.e. heat transfer efficiency, of this pad (hPAD), in a heated model and in nine volunteers' thighs; and of 10 degrees C water (hWATER) in 33 head-out immersions by 11 volunteers.
Volunteer studies had ethical approval and written informed consent. Calibrated heat flux transducers measured heat flux (W m-2). Temperature gradient (DeltaT) was measured between skin and pad or water temperatures. Temperature gradient was changed through the pad's water temperature controller or by skin cooling on immersion.
The heat transfer coefficient is the slope of W m-2/DeltaT: its unit is W m-2 degrees C-1. Average with (95% CI) was: model, hPAD = 110.4 (107.8-113.1), R2 = 0.99, n = 45; volunteers, hPAD = 109.8 (95.5-124.1), R2 = 0.83, n = 51; and water immersion, hWATER = 107.1 (98.1-116), R2 = 0.86, n = 94.
The heat transfer coefficient for the pad was the same in the model and volunteers, and equivalent to hWATER. Therefore, for the same DeltaT and heat transfer area, the Arctic Sun's heat transfer rate would equal water immersion. This has important implications for body cooling/rewarming rates.
PubMed ID
18339217 View in PubMed
Less detail

2368 records – page 1 of 237.