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Long-term integrated telerehabilitation of COPD Patients: a multicentre randomised controlled trial (iTrain).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286560
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2016 Aug 22;16(1):126
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-22-2016
Author
Paolo Zanaboni
Birthe Dinesen
Audhild Hjalmarsen
Hanne Hoaas
Anne E Holland
Cristino Carneiro Oliveira
Richard Wootton
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2016 Aug 22;16(1):126
Date
Aug-22-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Australia
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Denmark
Exercise Test
Exercise Therapy
Female
Health status
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - rehabilitation
Quality of Life
Self Care - methods
Self Efficacy
Telerehabilitation - methods
Abstract
Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is an effective intervention for the management of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, available resources are often limited, and many patients bear with poor availability of programmes. Sustaining PR benefits and regular exercise over the long term is difficult without any exercise maintenance strategy. In contrast to traditional centre-based PR programmes, telerehabilitation may promote more effective integration of exercise routines into daily life over the longer term and broaden its applicability and availability. A few studies showed promising results for telerehabilitation, but mostly with short-term interventions. The aim of this study is to compare long-term telerehabilitation with unsupervised exercise training at home and with standard care.
An international multicentre randomised controlled trial conducted across sites in three countries will recruit 120 patients with COPD. Participants will be randomly assigned to telerehabilitation, treadmill and control, and followed up for 2 years. The telerehabilitation intervention consists of individualised exercise training at home on a treadmill, telemonitoring by a physiotherapist via videoconferencing using a tablet computer, and self-management via a customised website. Patients in the treadmill arm are provided with a treadmill only to perform unsupervised exercise training at home. Patients in the control arm are offered standard care. The primary outcome is the combined number of hospitalisations and emergency department presentations. Secondary outcomes include changes in health status, quality of life, anxiety and depression, self-efficacy, subjective impression of change, physical performance, level of physical activity, and personal experiences in telerehabilitation.
This trial will provide evidence on whether long-term telerehabilitation represents a cost-effective strategy for the follow-up of patients with COPD. The delivery of telerehabilitation services will also broaden the availability of PR and maintenance strategies, especially to those living in remote areas and with no access to centre-based exercise programmes.
ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02258646 .
Notes
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PubMed ID
27549782 View in PubMed
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"The Heart Game": Using Gamification as Part of a Telerehabilitation Program for Heart Patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281770
Source
Games Health J. 2016 Feb;5(1):27-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Marcus Dithmer
Jack Ord Rasmussen
Erik Grönvall
Helle Spindler
John Hansen
Gitte Nielsen
Stine Bæk Sørensen
Birthe Dinesen
Source
Games Health J. 2016 Feb;5(1):27-33
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angina Pectoris - rehabilitation
Denmark
Heart Failure - rehabilitation
Humans
Middle Aged
Mobile Applications
Myocardial Infarction - rehabilitation
Telerehabilitation - methods
Video Games
Abstract
The aim of this article is to describe the development and testing of a prototype application ("The Heart Game") using gamification principles to assist heart patients in their telerehabilitation process in the Teledialog project.
A prototype game was developed via user-driven innovation and tested on 10 patients 48-89 years of age and their relatives for a period of 2 weeks. The application consisted of a series of daily challenges given to the patients and relatives and was based on several gamification principles. A triangulation of data collection techniques (interviews, participant observations, focus group interviews, and workshop) was used. Interviews with three healthcare professionals and 10 patients were carried out over a period of 2 weeks in order to evaluate the use of the prototype.
The heart patients reported the application to be a useful tool as a part of their telerehabilitation process in everyday life. Gamification and gameful design principles such as leaderboards, relationships, and achievements engaged the patients and relatives. The inclusion of a close relative in the game motivated the patients to perform rehabilitation activities.
"The Heart Game" concept presents a new way to motivate heart patients by using technology as a social and active approach to telerehabilitation. The findings show the potential of using gamification for heart patients as part of a telerehabilitation program. The evaluation indicated that the inclusion of the patient's spouse in the rehabilitation activities could be an effective strategy. A major challenge in using gamification for heart patients is avoiding a sense of defeat while still adjusting the level of difficulty to the individual patient.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26579590 View in PubMed
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