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485 records – page 1 of 49.

Source
J Emerg Med. 1988 Mar-Apr;6(2):143
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Crosby
Source
J Emerg Med. 1988 Mar-Apr;6(2):143
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Emergency Medical Service Communication Systems
Emergency medical services
Humans
Telephone
PubMed ID
3385178 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Telemed Today. 1998 Apr-May;6(2):22-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
E. Rosen
Author Affiliation
Impact Video Communication, San Francisco, CA, USA. erosen@impactvid.com
Source
Telemed Today. 1998 Apr-May;6(2):22-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Computer Communication Networks - instrumentation - trends
Dentistry
Home Care Services
Humans
Telemedicine - instrumentation - trends
Telephone - instrumentation - trends
Television - instrumentation
United States
PubMed ID
10181176 View in PubMed
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Access and interest: two important issues in considering the feasibility of web-assisted tobacco interventions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154400
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2008;10(5):e37
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
John A Cunningham
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada. John_Cunningham@camh.net
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2008;10(5):e37
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Feasibility Studies
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Health Surveys
Humans
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Predictive value of tests
Regression Analysis
Smoking - adverse effects
Smoking Cessation - methods
Telephone
Therapy, Computer-Assisted - methods
User-Computer Interface
Young Adult
Abstract
Previous research has found that current smokers are less likely to have access to the Internet than nonsmokers. As access to the Internet continues to expand, does this finding remain true? Also, how many smokers are interested in Web-assisted tobacco interventions (WATIs)? These questions are important to determine the potential role that WATIs might play in promoting tobacco cessation.
The aims of the study were to determine whether smokers are less likely than nonsmokers to have access to the Internet and to establish the level of interest in WATIs among a representative sample of smokers.
A random digit dialing telephone survey was conducted of 8467 adult respondents, 18 years and older, in Ontario, Canada from September 2006 to August 2007. All respondents were asked their smoking status and whether they used the Internet (at home or work in the past 12 months; where; how often in the past 12 months). To assess the level of interest in WATIs, current daily smokers were asked whether they would be interested in a confidential program that they could access on the Internet, free of charge, that would allow them to check their smoking and compare it to other Canadians.
Smokers were marginally less likely to have used the Internet than nonsmokers (74% vs 81% in the last year), and, of those who had access to the Internet, smokers used the Internet less often than nonsmokers. Overall, 40% of smokers said they would be interested in a WATI. The number of cigarettes smoked per day was unrelated to level of interest in the WATI, but time to first cigarette after waking was. Smokers who used the Internet were more interested in the WATI than smokers who did not use the Internet (46% vs 20%).
While the difference in level of Internet use between smokers and nonsmokers was greatly reduced compared to 2002 and 2004 data, smokers still remain marginally less likely to use the Internet than nonsmokers. Overall, there was a substantial level of interest in the WATI among smokers, in particular among smokers who currently use the Internet. These results indicate that WATIs have a substantial potential audience among smokers, and, given the growing body of evidence regarding their efficacy, there is growing support that WATIs have a significant role to play in promoting tobacco cessation.
Notes
Cites: Br J Addict. 1989 Jul;84(7):791-92758152
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2005;7(1):e215829474
Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2005 Apr;7(2):207-1616036277
Cites: J Health Commun. 2005;10 Suppl 1:105-1816377603
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2006;8(3):e1717032633
Cites: Tob Control. 2006 Feb;15(1):7-1216436397
Cites: Addict Behav. 2006 Feb;31(2):264-7715950392
Cites: Drug Alcohol Rev. 2006 Jan;25(1):79-8416492580
Cites: Med Inform Internet Med. 2006 Mar;31(1):53-816754367
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2006 Jan;75(1):110-616125450
PubMed ID
18984558 View in PubMed
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[Access to general practitioners in a county in Troms]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70574
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Aug 25;125(16):2210-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-25-2005
Author
Anne Helen Hansen
Ivar J Aaraas
Jorun Støvne Pettersen
Gerd Ersdal
Author Affiliation
Tromsø kommune, Rådhuset, 9299 Tromsø. anne.helen.hansen@tromso.kommune.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Aug 25;125(16):2210-2
Date
Aug-25-2005
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Emergency Medical Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
English Abstract
Family Practice - standards - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services Accessibility - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews
Male
Norway
Physicians, Family
Physicians, Women
Referral and Consultation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Rural Health Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Telephone
Urban Health Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In 2002 the Norwegian Board of Health made a survey of the accessibility of general practitioners in Troms county in North Norway. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a telephone interview one secretary in each surgery informed about telephone response time, planned time for telephone consultations, recorded numbers of urgent consultations, and waiting time to obtain a routine consultation. RESULTS: On average, the planned telephone time was two hours per week. Telephone time was in inverse proportion to the number of patients on the doctor's list. Rural doctors spent twice as much time as urban colleagues on the telephone with their patients. Doctors with lists between 500 and 1500 patients had a higher proportion of urgent consultations compared with doctors with shorter or longer lists. INTERPRETATION: Telephone response time below two minutes and waiting times for routine consultations below 20 days appear to be within acceptable norms. When patient lists are above 1500, doctors' capacity to offer telephone contact and emergency services to their patients seems reduced.
PubMed ID
16138139 View in PubMed
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[Access to health care: perceptions of patients with multiple chronic conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167791
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2005 Nov;51:1502-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Martin Fortin
Danielle Maltais
Catherine Hudon
Lise Lapointe
Antoine Lutumba Ntetu
Author Affiliation
Département de Médecine de Famille, l'Université de Sherbrooke.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2005 Nov;51:1502-3
Date
Nov-2005
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appointments and Schedules
Chronic Disease
Communication Barriers
Female
Health Care Surveys - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians
Quebec
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Telephone
Waiting Lists
Abstract
To explore access to health care for patients presenting with multiple chronic conditions and to identify barriers and factors conducive to access.
Qualitative study with focus groups.
Family practice unit in Chicoutimi (Saguenay), Que.
Twenty-five male and female adult patients with at least four chronic conditions but no cognitive disorders or decompensating conditions.
For this pilot study, only three focus group discussions were held.
The main barriers to accessing follow-up appointments included long waits on the telephone, automated telephone-answering systems, and needing to attend at specific times to obtain appointments. The main barriers to specialized care were long waiting times and the need to get prescriptions and referrals from family physicians. Factors reported conducive to access included systematic callbacks and the personal involvement of family physicians. Good communication between family physicians and specialists was also perceived to be an important factor in access.
Systematic callbacks, family physicians' personal efforts to obtain follow-up visits, and better physician-specialist communication were all suggested as ways to improve access to care for patients with multiple chronic conditions.
Notes
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2000 Dec;51(11):1611-2511072882
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2001 Jul;54(7):661-7411438406
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2002 Nov 11;162(20):2269-7612418941
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2003 Oct;84(10):1417-2514586907
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 1997 Sep-Oct;16(5):149-629314686
Cites: J Ambul Care Manage. 1998 Jul;21(3):17-2610181843
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2005 May-Jun;3(3):223-815928225
PubMed ID
16926944 View in PubMed
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Source
CMAJ. 2001 Aug 21;165(4):397
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-21-2001
Author
E J Therien
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Aug 21;165(4):397
Date
Aug-21-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Automobile Driving - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Ontario
Telephone
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1997 Feb 13;336(7):453-89017937
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 May 29;164(11):1557, 155911402789
Comment In: CMAJ. 2002 Jan 8;166(1):14-511800238
Comment On: CMAJ. 2001 May 29;164(11):1557, 155911402789
PubMed ID
11531045 View in PubMed
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Accuracy in identifying patients with loss of consciousness in a police-operated emergency call centre - first step in the chain of survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163888
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2007 Jul;51(6):742-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
A. Bach
E F Christensen
Author Affiliation
Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Aarhus Traumacentre, Aarhus, Denmark. allanbach@dadlnet.dk
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2007 Jul;51(6):742-6
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Emergencies
False Negative Reactions
False Positive Reactions
Heart Arrest - diagnosis
Humans
Police
Survival Analysis
Survivors
Telephone
Unconsciousness - diagnosis - etiology - mortality
Wakefulness
Abstract
The first link in the 'chain of survival' is the activation of Emergency Medical Services (EMS). In the major part of Denmark, police officers operate the alarm 1-1-2 centre, including calls for EMS. Our aim was to study the police 1-1-2 operators' accuracy in identifying calls concerning patients with loss of consciousness as a key symptom of life-threatening conditions. 'Unconsciousness' was defined as patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of or = 9, 972 of whom were reported 'awake', giving a specificity of 72%. The positive predictive value (percentage of patients found with a GCS score of
PubMed ID
17465976 View in PubMed
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Adult tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis immunization: knowledge, beliefs, behavior and anticipated uptake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177563
Source
Vaccine. 2004 Dec 2;23(3):353-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2-2004
Author
Danuta M Skowronski
Karen Pielak
Valencia P Remple
Beth A Halperin
David M Patrick
Monika Naus
Cheryl McIntyre
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, 655 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, Canada V5Z 4R4. danuta.skowronski@bccdc.ca
Source
Vaccine. 2004 Dec 2;23(3):353-61
Date
Dec-2-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Attitude to Health
British Columbia
Diphtheria - immunology - prevention & control
Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine - economics - immunology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Immunization, Secondary
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Telephone
Tetanus - immunology - prevention & control
Vaccines, Acellular - economics - immunology
Whooping Cough - immunology - prevention & control
Abstract
Lifetime protection against pertussis has been adopted as a goal of immunization programs in Canada. To anticipate adult coverage with a combined product containing tetanus (T) and diphtheria (d) toxoids and acellular pertussis (aP) vaccine as a booster dose, we conducted a survey of households in British Columbia, Canada.
In a random telephone survey involving 800 adults, 25 years of age and older, we assessed current behaviors related to adult Td immunization and beliefs regarding pertussis vaccine under various scenarios relevant to adult decision-making.
Forty-five percent of participants reported having received tetanus vaccine within the previous 10 years; this rate was lowest amongst elderly persons 65 years of age or more (28%). On multi-variate analysis, being up-to-date with tetanus immunization was independently associated with belief that an adult should be immunized against tetanus and perception that tetanus is life-threatening and inversely associated with being elderly. At baseline, 59% of respondents indicated willingness to receive pertussis immunization if provided free; this increased to 76% following sequential information about communicability and severity of pertussis illness and safety, efficacy and convenience of vaccine and up to 87% if accompanied by physician or nurse recommendation. Sixty-three percent of adults indicated they would receive the vaccine if required to pay $40.00 (Cdn) for it.
Personal risk perception, public funding and physician recommendation are important to adults when considering tetanus and pertussis immunization. These factors may be relevant as immunization programs are expanded to include more adults generally.
PubMed ID
15530680 View in PubMed
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Agreement between self-reported and routinely collected health-care utilization data among seniors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189310
Source
Health Serv Res. 2002 Jun;37(3):751-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Parminder Raina
Vicki Torrance-Rynard
Micheline Wong
Christel Woodward
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
Source
Health Serv Res. 2002 Jun;37(3):751-74
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Services - utilization
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient satisfaction
Physician-Patient Relations
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Self Disclosure
Telephone
Abstract
To examine the agreement between self-reported and routinely collected administrative health-care utilization data, and the factors associated with agreement between these two data sources.
A representative sample of seniors living in an Ontario county within Canada was identified using the Ontario Ministry of Health's Registered Persons Data Base in 1992. Health professional billing information and hospitalization data were obtained from the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (OMH) and the Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP).
A cross-sectional survey was carried out to assess any contact and frequency of contacts with health professionals and hospital admissions. Similar information was obtained from routinely collected administrative data. The level of agreement was assessed using the proportion of absolute agreement, Cohen's kappa statistic (kappa), and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Logistic and linear regressions were used to identify factors that were associated with the magnitude and direction of disagreement respectively.
Telephone interviews were conducted on 1,054 seniors, and complete data were available for 1,038 seniors. Each respondent's personal health number was used to electronically link survey data with health professional billing and hospitalization databases.
Substantial to almost perfect agreement was found for the contact utilization measures, while agreement on volume utilization measures varied from poor to almost perfect. In surveys, seniors overreported contact with general practitioners and physiotherapists or chiropractors, and underreported contact with other medical specialists. Seniors also underreported the number of contacts with general practitioners and other medical specialists. The odds of agreement decreased if respondents were male, aged 75 years and older, had incomes of less than $25,000, had poor/fair/good self-assessed health status, or had two or more chronic conditions.
The findings of this study indicate that there are substantial discrepancies between self-reported and administrative data among older adults. Researchers seeking to examine health-care use among older adults need to consider these discrepancies in the interpretation of their results. Failure to recognize these discrepancies between survey and administrative data among older adults may lead to the establishment of inappropriate health-care policies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
12132604 View in PubMed
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Alberta Diabetes and Physical Activity Trial (ADAPT): a randomized theory-based efficacy trial for adults with type 2 diabetes--rationale, design, recruitment, evaluation, and dissemination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146122
Source
Trials. 2010;11:4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Ronald C Plotnikoff
Kerry S Courneya
Ronald J Sigal
Jeffrey A Johnson
Nicholas Birkett
David Lau
Kim Raine
Steven T Johnson
Nandini Karunamuni
Author Affiliation
School of Education, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW Australia. ron.plotnikoff@newcastle.edu.au
Source
Trials. 2010;11:4
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actigraphy - instrumentation
Alberta
Behavior Therapy
Biological Markers - blood
Counseling
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - psychology - therapy
Exercise Therapy - methods
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Pamphlets
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Selection
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Design
Telephone
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The primary aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of three physical activity (PA) behavioural intervention strategies in a sample of adults with type 2 diabetes.
Participants (N = 287) were randomly assigned to one of three groups consisting of the following intervention strategies: (1) standard printed PA educational materials provided by the Canadian Diabetes Association [i.e., Group 1/control group)]; (2) standard printed PA educational materials as in Group 1, pedometers, a log book and printed PA information matched to individuals' PA stage of readiness provided every 3 months (i.e., Group 2); and (3) PA telephone counseling protocol matched to PA stage of readiness and tailored to personal characteristics, in addition to the materials provided in Groups 1 and 2 (i.e., Group 3). PA behaviour measured by the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire and related social-cognitive measures were assessed at baseline, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 18-months (i.e., 6-month follow-up). Clinical (biomarkers) and health-related quality of life assessments were conducted at baseline, 12-months, and 18-months. Linear Mixed Model (LMM) analyses will be used to examine time-dependent changes from baseline across study time points for Groups 2 and 3 relative to Group 1.
ADAPT will determine whether tailored but low-cost interventions can lead to sustainable increases in PA behaviours. The results may have implications for practitioners in designing and implementing theory-based physical activity promotion programs for this population.
ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00221234.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20067626 View in PubMed
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485 records – page 1 of 49.