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[Automated electrocardiographic diagnosis of ventricular hypertrophy in the system of the cardiologic telemetric consultation-diagnostic center].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234542
Source
Kardiologiia. 1987 Nov;27(11):80-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1987
Author
E Sh Khalfen
Iu N Shigin
Source
Kardiologiia. 1987 Nov;27(11):80-4
Date
Nov-1987
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiomegaly - diagnosis
Computer Communication Networks
Electrocardiography - methods
Heart Ventricles
Humans
Referral and Consultation
Russia
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Telemetry - methods
Abstract
A method and algorithm of automated diagnosis of ventricular hypertrophy is described for electrocardiograms, transmitted by telephone to the remote-control consultative diagnostic centre. The validity of computerized ECG diagnosis was assessed in comparison to roentgenologic, echocardiographic and angiographic diagnosis, on the one hand, and a collective ECG diagnosis made by physicians, on the other. Automated electrocardiographic diagnosis is shown to be only slightly less accurate, as compared to physicians' diagnosis. Left ventricular hypertrophy was diagnosed correctly on the basis of ECG findings in 73.01% by a physicians' counsel, and in 69.8% of cases by the computer; in case of right ventricular hypertrophy, the rates were 55.2% and 44.7%, respectively.
PubMed ID
2963930 View in PubMed
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[Automatic electrocardiographic diagnosis of the main types of arrhythmia at a remote cardiologic consultation and diagnostic center].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231903
Source
Kardiologiia. 1989 Jan;29(1):25-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1989
Author
Khalfen ESh
O K Rybak
Source
Kardiologiia. 1989 Jan;29(1):25-9
Date
Jan-1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Arrhythmias, Cardiac - diagnosis
Electrocardiography - methods
Humans
Referral and Consultation
Russia
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Telemetry - methods
Abstract
A combination of methods based on hardware, software and mathematical support, was used to filter an ECG signal, transmitted telemetrically to the computer. Clusterization of P-Q and R-R intervals was used as primary informative ECG signs, providing the basis for the diagnosis of the type of heart rhythm disorder. The comparison was made by correlation of ranges. An algorithm, based on unconventional clinical signs, was developed. An analysis of 672 electrocardiograms has demonstrated that mean sensitivity of the proposed automated diagnosis of the basic heart rhythm is 96.9%, and its specificity is 98.0%.
PubMed ID
2525207 View in PubMed
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Clinical experience with telemetric intracranial pressure monitoring in a Danish neurosurgical center.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263249
Source
Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2014 May;120:36-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Alexander Lilja
Morten Andresen
Amer Hadi
Dorthe Christoffersen
Marianne Juhler
Source
Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2014 May;120:36-40
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - methods - standards
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Female
Humans
Hydrocephalus - diagnosis
Intracranial Hypertension - diagnosis
Intracranial Pressure - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prostheses and Implants - adverse effects
Surgical Wound Infection
Telemetry - methods - standards
Young Adult
Abstract
Monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) is important in the optimal treatment of various neurological and neurosurgical diseases. Telemetric ICP monitoring allows long-term measurements in the patient's everyday life and the possibility to perform additional measurements without the procedure related risks of repeated transducer insertions.
We identified all patients in our clinic with an implanted Raumedic(®) telemetric ICP probe (NEUROVENT(®)-P-tel). For each patient we identified diagnosis, indication for implantation, surgical complications, duration of ICP reading, number of ICP recording sessions (in relation to symptoms of increased ICP) and their clinical consequence.
We included 21 patients in the evaluation (11 female and 10 male). Median age was 28 (2-83) years and median duration of disease was 11 (0-30) years. Eleven patients had various kinds of hydrocephalus, seven patients had idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and three patients had normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Fifteen patients had a shunt prior to implantation. Median duration of implantation was 248 (49-666) days and median duration from implantation to last recording session was 154 (8-433) days. In total, 86 recording sessions were performed; 29 resulted in surgical shunt revision, 30 in change of acetazolamide dose or programmable valve setting, 20 required no action and 5 resulted in a new recording session. No surgical complications occurred, except for late wound infection at the surgical site in two patients.
Telemetric ICP monitoring is useful in patients with complicated CSF dynamic disturbances who would otherwise require repeated invasive pressure monitoring. It seems to be a feasible method to guide adjustment of programmable valve settings and to identify patients with chronic or repeated shunt problems.
PubMed ID
24731573 View in PubMed
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Continuous electrocardiographic monitoring and cardiac arrest outcomes in 8,932 telemetry ward patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197827
Source
Acad Emerg Med. 2000 Jun;7(6):647-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
M J Schull
D A Redelmeier
Author Affiliation
Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mjs@ices.on.ca
Source
Acad Emerg Med. 2000 Jun;7(6):647-52
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Confidence Intervals
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Arrest - diagnosis - mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Physiologic - instrumentation - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Sensitivity and specificity
Survival Rate
Telemetry - methods - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To estimate the benefit of routine electrocardiographic (ECG) telemetry monitoring on in-hospital cardiac arrest survival.
In a tertiary care hospital, all telemetry ward admissions and cardiac arrests occurring over a five-year period were reviewed. Ward location and survival to discharge were determined for all patients outside of critical care areas.
During the study period, 8,932 patients were admitted to the telemetry ward, and 20 suffered cardiac arrest (0.2%; 95% CI = 0.1 to 0.3). Telemetry monitors signaled the onset of cardiac arrest in only 56% (95% CI = 30 to 80) of monitored arrests. Three patients survived to discharge, and in two of these three patients the arrest onset was signaled by the monitor. This yields a monitor-signaled survival rate among telemetry ward patients of 0.02% (95% CI = 0 to 0.05). All survivors suffered significant arrhythmias prior to their cardiac arrests.
Cardiac arrest is an uncommon event among telemetry ward patients, and monitor-signaled survivors are extremely rare. Routine telemetry offers little cardiac arrest survival benefit to most monitored patients, and a more selective policy for telemetry use might safely avoid ECG monitoring for many patients.
Notes
Comment In: Acad Emerg Med. 2000 Jun;7(6):687-810905649
PubMed ID
10905643 View in PubMed
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Heart Failure Telemonitoring in Japan and Sweden: A Cross-Sectional Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275006
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2015;17(11):e258
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Naoko P Kato
Peter Johansson
Ikuko Okada
Arjen E de Vries
Koichiro Kinugawa
Anna Strömberg
Tiny Jaarsma
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2015;17(11):e258
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies - methods
Female
Heart Failure - therapy
Humans
Japan
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Physiologic
Sweden
Telemetry - methods
Abstract
Telemonitoring of heart failure (HF) patients is increasingly discussed at conferences and addressed in research. However, little is known about actual use in specific countries.
We aimed to (1) describe the use of non-invasive HF telemonitoring, (2) clarify expectations of telemonitoring among cardiologists and nurses, and (3) describe barriers to the implementation of telemonitoring in Japan and Sweden.
This study used a cross-sectional survey of non-invasive HF telemonitoring. A total of 378 Japanese (120 cardiologists, 258 nurses) and 120 Swedish (39 cardiologists, 81 nurses) health care professionals from 165 Japanese and 61 Swedish hospitals/clinics nationwide participated in the study (210 in Japan and 98 in Sweden were approached). Data were collected between November 2013 and May 2014 with a questionnaire that was adapted from a previous Dutch study on telemonitoring.
The mean age of the cardiologists and nurses was 47 years and 41 years, respectively. Experience at the current position caring for HF patients was 19 years among the physicians and 15 years among the nurses. In total, 7 Japanese (4.2%) and none of the Swedish health care institutions used telemonitoring. One fourth (24.0%, 118/498) of the health care professionals were familiar with the technology (in Japan: 21.6%, 82/378; in Sweden: 30.0%, 36/120). The highest expectations of telemonitoring (rated on a scale from 0-10) were reduced hospitalizations (8.3 in Japan and 7.5 in Sweden), increased patient self-care (7.8 and 7.4), and offering high-quality care (7.8 and 7.0). The major goal for introducing telemonitoring was to monitor physical condition and recognize signs of worsening HF in Japan (94.1%, 352/374) and Sweden (88.7%, 102/115). The following reasons were also high in Sweden: to monitor effects of treatment and adjust it remotely (86.9%, 100/115) and to do remote drug titration (79.1%, 91/115). Just under a quarter of Japanese (22.4%, 85/378) and over a third of Swedish (38.1%, 45/118) health care professionals thought that telemonitoring was a good way to follow up stable HF patients. Three domains of barriers were identified by content analysis: organizational barriers "how are we going to do it?" (categories include structure and resource), health care professionals themselves "what do we need to know and do" (reservation), and barriers related to patients "not everybody would benefit" (internal and external shortcomings).
Telemonitoring for HF patients has not been implemented in Japan or Sweden. However, health care professionals have expectations of telemonitoring to reduce patients' hospitalizations and increase patient self-care. There are still a wide range of barriers to the implementation of HF telemonitoring.
Notes
Cites: Nurs Stand. 2012 Sep 26-Oct 2;27(4):44-823101298
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2013;15(1):e423305645
Cites: Eur J Heart Fail. 2012 Aug;14(8):803-6922828712
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2001 Dec;64(2-3):143-5611734382
Cites: Milbank Q. 2004;82(4):581-62915595944
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2005 Nov;15(9):1277-8816204405
Cites: Circ J. 2008 Mar;72(3):489-9118296852
Cites: Eur J Heart Fail. 2009 Mar;11(3):319-2519174529
Cites: Eur J Heart Fail. 2009 Mar;11(3):312-819228800
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Oct 27;54(18):1683-9419850208
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010;(8):CD00722820687083
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2010 Dec 9;363(24):2301-921080835
Cites: Circulation. 2011 May 3;123(17):1873-8021444883
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Cites: Eur J Heart Fail. 2012 Mar;14(3):333-4022045925
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Cites: J Telemed Telecare. 2013 Jan;19(1):18-2223390212
Cites: Curr Heart Fail Rep. 2013 Sep;10(3):254-6123666901
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Cites: Heart Fail Rev. 2015 Jan;20(1):107-1624972644
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2015 Feb;71(2):326-3725069605
PubMed ID
26567061 View in PubMed
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Improvement of in-hospital telemetry monitoring in coronary care units: an intervention study for achieving optimal electrode placement and attachment, hygiene and delivery of critical information to patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264513
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2014 Dec;13(6):515-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Trond R Pettersen
Nina Fålun
Tone M Norekvål
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2014 Dec;13(6):515-23
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arrhythmias, Cardiac - diagnosis - nursing - therapy
Cardiac Pacing, Artificial - methods
Coronary Care Units
Electrocardiography
Electrodes, Implanted
Female
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Hygiene
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Intervention Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Physiologic - methods
Norway
Nurse's Role
Patient Education as Topic - organization & administration
Prospective Studies
Quality Improvement
Severity of Illness Index
Telemetry - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
In-hospital telemetry monitoring is important for diagnosis and treatment of patients at risk of developing life-threatening arrhythmias. It is widely used in critical and non-critical care wards. Nurses are responsible for correct electrode placement, thus ensuring optimal quality of the monitoring. The aims of this study were to determine whether a complex educational intervention improves (a) optimal electrode placement, (b) hygiene, and (c) delivery of critical information to patients (reason for monitoring, limitations in cellular phone use, and not to leave the ward without informing a member of staff).
A prospective interventional study design was used, with data collection occurring over two six-week periods: before implementation of the intervention (n=201) and after the intervention (n=165). Standard abstraction forms were used to obtain data on patients' clinical characteristics, and 10 variables related to electrode placement and attachment, hygiene and delivery of critical information.
At pre-intervention registration, 26% of the electrodes were misplaced. Twelve per cent of the patients received information about limiting their cellular phone use while monitored, 70% were informed of the purpose of monitoring, and 71% used a protective cover for their unit. Post-intervention, outcome measures for the three variables improved significantly: use of protective cover (p
PubMed ID
24304659 View in PubMed
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A mobile telemedicine unit for emergency and screening purposes: experience from north-west Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181231
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2004;10(1):11-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
S B Uldal
J. Amerkhanov
S. Manankova Bye
A. Mokeev
J. Norum
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Centre for Telemedicine, University Hospital of North Norway, Norway. siri.birgitte.uldal@telemed.no
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2004;10(1):11-5
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Electrocardiography - methods
Electroencephalography - methods
Emergency Medical Services - methods - utilization
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods - utilization
Medically underserved area
Middle Aged
Mobile Health Units - utilization
Pilot Projects
Russia
Telecommunications
Telemedicine - methods - utilization
Telemetry - methods - utilization
Teleradiology - methods - utilization
Abstract
A mobile telemedicine unit (MTU) was constructed for emergency and screening purposes in north-west Russia. The MTU included facilities for endoscopy, electrocardiography and digital photography. Data transmission was by ordinary telephone line. Between July and December 1999, the MTU was used in 48 incidents, involving 44 patients. The MTU was used to conduct 22 teleradiology examinations and 20 electrocardiograms were transmitted; in 10 cases still images of patients were transmitted and three consultations included tele-electroencephalography. Despite poor-quality analogue telephone lines, the MTU may prove useful in north-west Russia. Following the pilot study, the local Russian health administration stated that the MTU should always be included on emergency trips to the districts.
PubMed ID
15006209 View in PubMed
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[Organization of remote long-term support of the patients with cochlear implants in distant regions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133279
Source
Vestn Otorinolaringol. 2011;(3):8-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
V E Kuzovkov
Iu K Ianov
S G Vakhrushev
V I Pudov
S V Levin
S B Sugarova
Source
Vestn Otorinolaringol. 2011;(3):8-10
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Audiometry
Child
Child, Preschool
Cochlear Implants
Deafness - rehabilitation - surgery
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Retrospective Studies
Russia
Speech Perception
Telemetry - methods
Time Factors
Abstract
The concept of remote long-term support of the patients with cochlear implants is suggested to cope with the problem of the increasingly growing number of patients with cochlear pathology. The authors deem it necessary to provide intraoperative support and postoperative follow-up technologies for the patients living far from the cochlear implantation centres. A scheme for the remote selection of patients and their intraoperative monitoring is proposed with the use of implant telemetry, electrical stapedial reflex (eSRT) testing, auditory response telemetry (ART), and surgical on-line counseling. Remote follow-up and rehabilitation should include cochlear implant tuning, speech therapy, and on-line workshops for the patients and/or specialists. The choice and the use of software and hardware for this purpose are discussed. The concept of remote long-term support turned out to be an efficacious, reliable, time-saving, and cost-effective tool for providing high-tech medical aid to patients with ENT diseases in the Krasnoyarsk kray (territory).
PubMed ID
21720284 View in PubMed
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Remote ischemic preconditioning and incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270518
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2015 Jun;49(3):117-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Lars Erik Berg Krogstad
Katrine Hordnes Slagsvold
Alexander Wahba
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2015 Jun;49(3):117-22
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Atrial Fibrillation - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects - methods
Coronary Artery Disease - surgery
Double-Blind Method
Electrocardiography - methods
Female
Humans
Incidence
Ischemic Preconditioning, Myocardial - methods
Male
MicroRNAs - blood
Middle Aged
Myocardial Reperfusion Injury - blood - etiology - prevention & control
Norway
Postoperative Complications - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Preoperative Care - methods
Telemetry - methods
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Although remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) has shown favorable effects on ischemia-reperfusion injury, much remains unknown of its mechanisms and clinical significance. We hypothesized that RIPC would reduce the incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. In addition, we investigated whether RIPC could induce alterations of circulating microRNA in blood plasma.
This is a single-center, double-blind, randomized controlled trial. 92 adult patients referred for first-time isolated CABG surgery were randomly assigned to either RIPC (n = 45) or control (n = 47). The RIPC-stimulus comprised three 5-min cycles of upper arm ischemia, induced by inflating a blood pressure cuff to 200 mmHg, with an intervening 5 min reperfusion. Heart rhythm was assessed by telemetry. MicroRNA expression was assessed in plasma by real-time polymerase chain reaction.
Of the 92 patients included in the study, 27 patients developed POAF (29%). 17 of these patients belonged to the RIPC group (38%), and 10 to the control group (21%). There were no significant alterations of microRNA expression.
We did not observe a reduced incidence of POAF by RIPC before CABG surgery. Larger multi-center studies may be necessary to further clarify this issue.
PubMed ID
25613907 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.