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4th annual telemedicine program review. Part 2: United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68966
Source
Telemed Today. 1997 Aug;5(4):30-8, 42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997

An Evaluation of In-Person and Online Engagement in Central Newfoundland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277010
Source
Healthc Policy. 2015 Nov;11(2):72-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Peter Wilton
Doreen Neville
Rick Audas
Heather Brown
Roger Chafe
Source
Healthc Policy. 2015 Nov;11(2):72-85
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Consumer Participation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internet - utilization
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Telemedicine - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Therapy, Computer-Assisted - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
This study evaluates the use of in-person focus groups and online engagement within the context of a large public engagement initiative conducted in rural Newfoundland.
Participants were surveyed about their engagement experience and demographic information. Pre and post key informant interviews were also conducted with organizers of the initiative.
Of the 111 participants in the focus groups, 97 (87%) completed evaluation surveys; as did 23 (88%) out of 26 online engagement participants. Overall, focus group participants were positive about their involvement, with 87.4% reporting that they would participate in a similar initiative. Online participation was below expectations and these participants viewed their experience less positively than in-person participants. Organizers viewed the engagement initiative and the combined use of online and in-person engagement positively.
This study presents a real-world example of the use of two methods of engagement. It also highlights the importance of the successful execution of whatever engagement mechanism is selected.
Notes
Cites: Med Teach. 2009 Feb;31(2):e36-919330662
Cites: Healthc Manage Forum. 2008 Winter;21(4):6-2119363962
Cites: Health Policy. 2009 Aug;91(3):219-2819261347
Cites: Healthc Q. 2010;13(3):86-9020523159
PubMed ID
26742117 View in PubMed
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Indian health service innovations have helped reduce health disparities affecting american Indian and alaska native people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130703
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 2011 Oct;30(10):1965-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Thomas D Sequist
Theresa Cullen
Kelly J Acton
Author Affiliation
Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 2011 Oct;30(10):1965-73
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Culture
Diffusion of Innovation
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Health Status Disparities
Healthcare Disparities - ethnology
Hospital Information Systems - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American
Life expectancy
Socioeconomic Factors
Telemedicine - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
United States
United States Indian Health Service - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Indian Health Service (IHS), a federal health system, cares for 2 million of the country's 5.2 million American Indian and Alaska Native people. This system has increasingly focused on innovative uses of health information technology and telemedicine, as well as comprehensive, locally tailored prevention and disease management programs, to promote health equity in a population facing multiple health disparities. Important recent achievements include a reduction in the life-expectancy gap between American Indian and Alaska Native people and whites (from eight years to five years) and improved measures of diabetes control (including 20 percent and 10 percent reductions in the levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and hemoglobin A1c, respectively). However, disparities persist between American Indian and Alaska Native people and the overall US population. Continued innovation and increased funding are required to further improve health and achieve equity.
PubMed ID
21976341 View in PubMed
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Innovation in Indian healthcare: using health information technology to achieve health equity for American Indian and Alaska Native populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137172
Source
Perspect Health Inf Manag. 2011;8:1d
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Mark Carroll
Theresa Cullen
Stewart Ferguson
Nathan Hogge
Mark Horton
John Kokesh
Author Affiliation
Indian Health Service, USA.
Source
Perspect Health Inf Manag. 2011;8:1d
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Diffusion of Innovation
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Health Status Disparities
Hospital Information Systems - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
North Carolina
Ophthalmology - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Telemedicine - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
United States
United States Indian Health Service
Abstract
The US Indian health system utilizes a diverse range of health information technology and innovative tools to enhance health service delivery for American Indians and Alaska Natives. This article provides an overview of efforts and experience using such tools to achieve health equity for American Indian and Alaska Native communities. Specific attention is given to the Indian Health Service Electronic Health Record and to two examples of telehealth innovation.
Notes
Cites: Ophthalmology. 2001 Mar;108(3):572-8511237913
Cites: J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2007 Mar-Apr;14(2):191-717213495
Cites: Otolaryngol Clin North Am. 2011 Dec;44(6):1359-74, ix22032488
Cites: Telemed J E Health. 2010 Jun;16(5):551-620575722
Cites: Telemed J E Health. 2009 Oct;15(8):758-6319780694
PubMed ID
21307987 View in PubMed
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