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3D visualization as a communicative aid in pharmaceutical advice-giving over distance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132831
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2011;13(3):e50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Ostlund M
Dahlbäck N
Petersson GI
Author Affiliation
eHealth Institute, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden. martin.ostlund@lnu.se
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2011;13(3):e50
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
Drug Interactions
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Health Services Research
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Pharmaceutical Services - utilization
Program Evaluation
Remote Consultation - methods
Sweden
Telemedicine - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Medication misuse results in considerable problems for both patient and society. It is a complex problem with many contributing factors, including timely access to product information.
To investigate the value of 3-dimensional (3D) visualization paired with video conferencing as a tool for pharmaceutical advice over distance in terms of accessibility and ease of use for the advice seeker.
We created a Web-based communication service called AssistancePlus that allows an advisor to demonstrate the physical handling of a complex pharmaceutical product to an advice seeker with the aid of 3D visualization and audio/video conferencing. AssistancePlus was tested in 2 separate user studies performed in a usability lab, under realistic settings and emulating a real usage situation. In the first study, 10 pharmacy students were assisted by 2 advisors from the Swedish National Co-operation of Pharmacies' call centre on the use of an asthma inhaler. The student-advisor interview sessions were filmed on video to qualitatively explore their experience of giving and receiving advice with the aid of 3D visualization. In the second study, 3 advisors from the same call centre instructed 23 participants recruited from the general public on the use of 2 products: (1) an insulin injection pen, and (2) a growth hormone injection syringe. First, participants received advice on one product in an audio-recorded telephone call and for the other product in a video-recorded AssistancePlus session (product order balanced). In conjunction with the AssistancePlus session, participants answered a questionnaire regarding accessibility, perceived expressiveness, and general usefulness of 3D visualization for advice-giving over distance compared with the telephone and were given a short interview focusing on their experience of the 3D features.
In both studies, participants found the AssistancePlus service helpful in providing clear and exact instructions. In the second study, directly comparing AssistancePlus and the telephone, AssistancePlus was judged positively for ease of communication (P = .001), personal contact (P = .001), explanatory power (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
21771714 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accuracy of tele-oncology compared with face-to-face consultation in head and neck cancer case conferences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19396
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2001;7(6):338-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
J. Stalfors
S. Edström
T. Björk-Eriksson
C. Mercke
J. Nyman
T. Westin
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. joacim.stalfors@orlforum.com
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2001;7(6):338-43
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case Management - organization & administration
Feasibility Studies
Female
Head and Neck Neoplasms - diagnosis - therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Examination
Remote Consultation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Telemedicine - methods
Abstract
Telemedicine was introduced for weekly tumour case conferences between Sahlgrenska University Hospital and two district hospitals in Sweden. The accuracy of tele-oncology was determined using simulated telemedicine consultations, in which all the material relating to each case was presented but without the patient in person. The people attending the conference were asked to determine the tumour ('TNM') classification and treatment. The patient was then presented in person, to give the audience the opportunity to ask questions and perform a physical examination. Then a new discussion regarding the tumour classification and the treatment plan took place, and the consensus was recorded. Of the 98 consecutive patients studied in this way, 80 could be evaluated by both techniques. Of these 80, 73 (91%) had the same classification and treatment plan in the telemedicine simulation as in the subsequent face-to-face consultation. In four cases the TNM classification was changed and for three patients the treatment plan was altered. The specialists also had to state their degree of confidence in the tele-oncology decisions. When they recorded uncertainty about their decision, it was generally because they wanted to palpate the tumour. In five of the seven patients with a different outcome, the clinical evaluation was stated to be dubious or not possible. The results show that telemedicine can be used safely for the management of head and neck cancers.
PubMed ID
11747635 View in PubMed
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Advancing beyond the system: telemedicine nurses' clinical reasoning using a computerised decision support system for patients with COPD - an ethnographic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294693
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2017 12 28; 17(1):181
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-28-2017
Author
Tina Lien Barken
Elin Thygesen
Ulrika Söderhamn
Author Affiliation
Centre for eHealth, Centre for Care Research, Southern Norway, Department of Health and Nursing Sciences, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Post box 422, 4604, Kristiansand, Norway. tina.l.barken@uia.no.
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2017 12 28; 17(1):181
Date
12-28-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Anthropology, Cultural
Clinical Decision-Making - methods
Decision Support Systems, Clinical
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Nursing - methods
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - therapy
Qualitative Research
Telemedicine - methods
Abstract
Telemedicine is changing traditional nursing care, and entails nurses performing advanced and complex care within a new clinical environment, and monitoring patients at a distance. Telemedicine practice requires complex disease management, advocating that the nurses' reasoning and decision-making processes are supported. Computerised decision support systems are being used increasingly to assist reasoning and decision-making in different situations. However, little research has focused on the clinical reasoning of nurses using a computerised decision support system in a telemedicine setting. Therefore, the objective of the study is to explore the process of telemedicine nurses' clinical reasoning when using a computerised decision support system for the management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The factors influencing the reasoning and decision-making processes were investigated.
In this ethnographic study, a combination of data collection methods, including participatory observations, the think-aloud technique, and a focus group interview was employed. Collected data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.
When telemedicine nurses used a computerised decision support system for the management of patients with complex, unstable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, two categories emerged: "the process of telemedicine nurses' reasoning to assess health change" and "the influence of the telemedicine setting on nurses' reasoning and decision-making processes". An overall theme, termed "advancing beyond the system", represented the connection between the reasoning processes and the telemedicine work and setting, where being familiar with the patient functioned as a foundation for the nurses' clinical reasoning process.
In the telemedicine setting, when supported by a computerised decision support system, nurses' reasoning was enabled by the continuous flow of digital clinical data, regular video-mediated contact and shared decision-making with the patient. These factors fostered an in-depth knowledge of the patients and acted as a foundation for the nurses' reasoning process. Nurses' reasoning frequently advanced beyond the computerised decision support system recommendations. Future studies are warranted to develop more accurate algorithms, increase system maturity, and improve the integration of the digital clinical information with clinical experiences, to support telemedicine nurses' reasoning process.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29282068 View in PubMed
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AmbuFlex: tele-patient-reported outcomes (telePRO) as the basis for follow-up in chronic and malignant diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276984
Source
Qual Life Res. 2016 Mar;25(3):525-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Liv Marit Valen Schougaard
Louise Pape Larsen
Anne Jessen
Per Sidenius
Liv Dorflinger
Annette de Thurah
Niels Henrik Hjollund
Source
Qual Life Res. 2016 Mar;25(3):525-34
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - methods
Chronic Disease
Denmark
Follow-Up Studies
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Neoplasms
Patient Outcome Assessment
Quality of Life
Surveys and Questionnaires
Symptom Assessment
Telemedicine - methods
Abstract
A tele-patient-reported outcome (telePRO) model includes outpatients' reports of symptoms and health status from home before or instead of visiting the outpatient clinic. In the generic PRO system, AmbuFlex, telePRO is used to decide whether a patient needs an outpatient visit and is thus a tool for better symptom assessment, more patient-centred care, and more efficient use of resources. Specific PROs are developed for each patient group. In this paper we describe our experiences with large-scale implementations of telePRO as the basis for follow-up in chronic and malignant diseases using the generic PRO system AmbuFlex.
The AmbuFlex concept consists of three generic elements: PRO data collection, PRO-based automated decision algorithm, and PRO-based graphical overview for clinical decision support. Experiences were described with respect to these elements.
By December 2015, AmbuFlex was implemented in nine diagnostic groups in Denmark. A total of 13,135 outpatients from 15 clinics have been individually referred. From epilepsy clinics, about 70 % of all their outpatients were referred. The response rates for the initial questionnaire were 81-98 %. Of 8256 telePRO-based contacts from epilepsy outpatients, up to 48 % were handled without other contact than the PRO assessment. Clinicians as well as patients reported high satisfaction with the system.
The results indicate that telePRO is feasible and may be recommended as the platform for follow-up in several patient groups with chronic and malignant diseases and with many consecutive outpatient contacts.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26790427 View in PubMed
Less detail

The American Indian veteran and posttraumatic stress disorder: a telehealth assessment and formulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6393
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2004 Jun;28(2):231-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Jay H Shore
Spero M Manson
Author Affiliation
American Indian and Alaska Native Programs, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO 80045-0508, USA. jay.shore@uchsc.edu
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2004 Jun;28(2):231-43
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Culture
Family - psychology
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Telemedicine - methods
United States
Veterans - psychology
PubMed ID
15470950 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of 9-1-1 calls to assess the effectiveness of dispatch-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) instructions: design and methodology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154391
Source
BMC Emerg Med. 2008;8:12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Christian Vaillancourt
Manya L Charette
Ian G Stiell
George A Wells
Author Affiliation
Ottawa Health Research Institute, Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa, Canada. cvaillancourt@ohri.ca
Source
BMC Emerg Med. 2008;8:12
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - statistics & numerical data
Clinical Trials as Topic - methods
Cohort Studies
Emergency Medical Service Communication Systems - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Medical Services - methods
First Aid - methods
Forecasting
Health Care Surveys
Heart Arrest - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Humans
Multicenter Studies as Topic - methods
Ontario - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Design
Sample Size
Survival Rate
Telemedicine - methods - statistics & numerical data
Telephone
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Cardiac arrest is the leading cause of mortality in Canada, and the overall survival rate for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest rarely exceeds 5%. Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has been shown to increase survival for cardiac arrest victims. However, bystander CPR rates remain low in Canada, rarely exceeding 15%, despite various attempts to improve them. Dispatch-assisted CPR instructions have the potential to improve rates of bystander CPR and many Canadian urban communities now offer instructions to callers reporting a victim in cardiac arrest. Dispatch-assisted CPR instructions are recommended by the International Guidelines on Emergency Cardiovascular Care, but their ability to improve cardiac arrest survival remains unclear.
The overall goal of this study is to better understand the factors leading to successful dispatch-assisted CPR instructions and to ultimately save the lives of more cardiac arrest patients. The study will utilize a before-after, prospective cohort design to specifically: 1) Determine the ability of 9-1-1 dispatchers to correctly diagnose cardiac arrest; 2) Quantify the frequency and impact of perceived agonal breathing on cardiac arrest diagnosis; 3) Measure the frequency with which dispatch-assisted CPR instructions can be successfully completed; and 4) Measure the impact of dispatch-assisted CPR instructions on bystander CPR and survival rates.The study will be conducted in 19 urban communities in Ontario, Canada. All 9-1-1 calls occurring in the study communities reporting out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in victims 16 years of age or older for which resuscitation was attempted will be eligible. Information will be obtained from 9-1-1 call recordings, paramedic patient care reports, base hospital records, fire medical records and hospital medical records. Victim, caller and system characteristics will be measured in the study communities before the introduction of dispatch-assisted CPR instructions (before group), during the introduction (run-in phase), and following the introduction (after group).
The study will obtain information essential to the development of clinical trials that will test a variety of educational approaches and delivery methods for telephone cardiopulmonary resuscitation instructions. This will be the first study in the world to clearly quantify the impact of dispatch-assisted CPR instructions on survival to hospital discharge for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims.
ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00664443.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18986546 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in high school using avatars in virtual worlds: an international feasibility study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117261
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2013;15(1):e9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Johan Creutzfeldt
Leif Hedman
LeRoy Heinrichs
Patricia Youngblood
Li Felländer-Tsai
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. johan.creutzfeldt@ki.se
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2013;15(1):e9
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - education
Curriculum
Feasibility Studies
Female
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Heart Arrest - therapy
Humans
Internet
Learning
Male
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Schools
Software
Students
Sweden
Telemedicine - methods
United States
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
Approximately 300,000 people suffer sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) annually in the United States. Less than 30% of out-of-hospital victims receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) despite the American Heart Association training over 12 million laypersons annually to conduct CPR. New engaging learning methods are needed for CPR education, especially in schools. Massively multiplayer virtual worlds (MMVW) offer platforms for serious games that are promising learning methods that take advantage of the computer capabilities of today's youth (ie, the digital native generation).
Our main aim was to assess the feasibility of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in high school students by using avatars in MMVM. We also analyzed experiences, self-efficacy, and concentration in response to training.
In this prospective international collaborative study, an e-learning method was used with high school students in Sweden and the United States. A software game platform was modified for use as a serious game to train in emergency medical situations. Using MMVW technology, participants in teams of 3 were engaged in virtual-world scenarios to learn how to treat victims suffering cardiac arrest. Short debriefings were carried out after each scenario. A total of 36 high school students (Sweden, n=12; United States, n=24) participated. Their self-efficacy and concentration (task motivation) were assessed. An exit questionnaire was used to solicit experiences and attitudes toward this type of training. Among the Swedish students, a follow-up was carried out after 6 months. Depending on the distributions, t tests or Mann-Whitney tests were used. Correlation between variables was assessed by using Spearman rank correlation. Regression analyses were used for time-dependent variables.
The participants enjoyed the training and reported a self-perceived benefit as a consequence of training. The mean rating for self-efficacy increased from 5.8/7 (SD 0.72) to 6.5/7 (SD 0.57, P
Notes
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PubMed ID
23318253 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular risk reduction via telehealth: a feasibility study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159238
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jan;24(1):57-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Anne M PausJenssen
Betty Anne Spooner
Merne P Wilson
Thomas W Wilson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medcine and the Cardiology Risk Factor Reduction Unit, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. anne.pausjenssen@saskatoonhealthregion.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jan;24(1):57-60
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology - prevention & control
Case-Control Studies
Feasibility Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Ambulatory
Patient satisfaction
Risk factors
Saskatchewan
Severity of Illness Index
Telemedicine - methods
Abstract
Successful cardiovascular risk reduction (CVRR) requires ongoing care, which can be difficult for patients living outside urban areas. The authors tested the feasibility of CVRR using telehealth.
Telehealth care (T group, n=9) was offered at three- to six-month intervals to patients referred from La Ronge, Saskatchewan (385 km northeast of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan). All patients who were referred to the project accepted. For the initial visit, the clinic travelled to La Ronge; all other visits were performed using telehealth (CommunityNet). Body measurements, blood pressure readings, fasting laboratory tests and food and exercise logs were completed in La Ronge. During the telehealth session, patients met with a nurse, a dietician, a fitness consultant and a physician. Changes in medication were faxed or telephoned to the local pharmacy. The T group's outcomes were compared with a control group (C group, n=15), which was offered usual care from La Ronge and had been referred to the clinic previously. Change in Framingham risk score, as well as patient and provider satisfaction, was assessed.
The groups were similar in age (T: 44.3+/-12.8 years, C: 48.3+/-14.3 years) and initial Framingham risk score (T: 12.0+/-13.0%, C: 11.1+/-10.0%). All nine T group patients completed two or more visits, while only eight of 15 patients the C group did so. Both groups achieved a small reduction in Framingham risk score (T: -1.9+/-5.0%, C: -2.0+/-6.1%). Those with the highest initial Framingham risk scores tended to show the greatest reduction. The T group's patient and health care provider comments were generally positive.
CVRR via telehealth is feasible and compares favourably with usual care. In particular, more complete follow-up occurs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18209771 View in PubMed
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Care Professionals' Perceived Usefulness Of A Rehabilitation Ehealth Service In Stroke Care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271730
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2015;216:992
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Nadia Davoody
Maria Hägglund
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2015;216:992
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Focus Groups
Humans
Program Evaluation
Stroke - rehabilitation
Sweden
Telemedicine - methods - standards
Abstract
Despite many attempts to support stroke patients, there is still room for improvement. The aim of this study is to gain insight into care professionals' perceived usefulness of an online care and rehabilitation planning tool. A functional prototype was developed and presented to a neurology team in a primary care centre in Stockholm. Three focus group meetings were conducted. The data were analysed based on the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology. The results indicate that the care professionals were positive towards the tool and described potential usefulness such as ease of understanding the rehabilitation process and support for collaboration among care providers and also cooperation between the patient and the team. They also identified challenges such as time limitation in daily care.
PubMed ID
26262294 View in PubMed
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Challenges in conducting mHealth research with underserved populations: Lessons learned.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283746
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2016 Oct;22(7):436-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Lonnie A Nelson
Anna Zamora-Kapoor
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2016 Oct;22(7):436-40
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Biomedical Research - methods
Cell Phones - utilization
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Mobile Applications - utilization
Surveys and Questionnaires
Telemedicine - methods
Vulnerable Populations - statistics & numerical data
Washington
Abstract
Previous studies have recognized the potential of mobile technology to improve health outcomes among underserved populations, but the challenges in conducting research into the use of mobile technology to improve health (mHealth) are not well understood. This manuscript identifies some of the most important challenges in conducting mHealth research with a sample of urban American Indian and Alaska Native mothers. We examined these challenges through an existing partnership with a community health agency. We conducted community consultations and a process monitoring phase for a pilot trial aimed at measuring the effect of a brief counselling session on participants' adherence to use of a mobile app. We identify generalizable challenges in administrative, technological, and logistical domains that will be useful foreknowledge to other investigators planning to conduct mHealth research with underserved populations.
PubMed ID
26468214 View in PubMed
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