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101 records – page 1 of 11.

Addressing suffering through an inter-professional online module: learning with, from, and about each other.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130885
Source
J Palliat Care. 2011;27(3):244-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Pippa Hall
Lynda Weaver
Timothy G Willett
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. phall@bruyere.org
Source
J Palliat Care. 2011;27(3):244-6
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Distance - methods
Education, Professional - methods
Humans
Internet
Interprofessional Relations
Ontario
Palliative Care
Pilot Projects
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control - psychology
Telecommunications
PubMed ID
21957803 View in PubMed
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Ageing in the information society: a European perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207255
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 1998;48:23-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998

Alaska Communications Increasing the Rural Health Care Funding Cap: White Paper.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297060
Source
Alaska State Legislature. House. HJR 14.
Publication Type
Fact Sheet
Date
January 16, 2017
help connect people to the services they need, weather those services are available within the agency or through referral.”3 According to Cross Road Health Ministries in Glennallen, Alaska: “The RHC Program has enabled us to implement telecommunications that significantly improve healthcare
  1 document  
Source
Alaska State Legislature. House. HJR 14.
Date
January 16, 2017
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Fact Sheet
File Size
194680
Keywords
Alaska
Rural Health Care Program
Telecommunications
Abstract
The Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) Rural Health Care (RHC) Program budget has remained static for 20 years, despite inflation, technology innovation and increased demand for services. The FCC expects the demand may exceed the cap for the first time in 2017. We have an opportunity, now, to continue supporting rural health care and increase the RHC budget by reallocating unused funds from existing programs, without putting pressure on the overall fund size or contribution factor.
Documents

HJR-14-Increasing-the-Rural-Healthcare-Fund-White-Paper--Alaska-Communications-3.7.2017.pdf

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Alaska Telehealth Advisory Commission final report

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288612
Source
Anchorage, Alaksa : Alaska Telehealth Advisory Commission. 51 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
1999
Author
Nighswander, Thomas.
Author Affiliation
State of Alaska. Department of Health & Social Services.
Source
Anchorage, Alaksa : Alaska Telehealth Advisory Commission. 51 p.
Date
1999
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Telecommunication in medicine -- Alaska
Health services accessibility -- Effect of technological innovations on -- Alaska
Health planning -- Alaska
Notes
ALASKA R119.9.A43 1999
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An economic perspective on teleradiology for remote communities

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76574
Source
Pages 390-393 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
I Cirewrrpolar Health 84:390-393 AN ECONOMIC PERSPECTIVE ON TELERADIOLOGY FOR REMOTE COMMUNITIES JOHN HORNE INTRODUCTION The delivery of radiographic diagnostic and consulting services to remote communi- ties via telecommunications technology has been shown to be feasible in several
  1 document  
Author
Horne, J.
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba
Source
Pages 390-393 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Date
1985
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Costs
Economics
Lake Winnipeg
Manitoba
Radiological services
Remote communities
Telecommunications
Teleradiology
Transportation savings
Utilization
Documents
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Source
Arctic Summer College. Arctic Circle Conference Discussion Session. Fellow Paper.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2015
THE ARCTIC DIGITAL DIVIDE ANDREAS KUERSTEN∗ I. Introduction For many, the Arctic’s harsh environment, remoteness, and sparse population are what make it so unique and beautiful. But these same qualities also make establishing reliable and fast telecommunications infrastructure in
  1 document  
Author
Kuersten, Andreas
Source
Arctic Summer College. Arctic Circle Conference Discussion Session. Fellow Paper.
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
208623
Keywords
Telecommunications
Arctic
Climate change
Infrastructure
Development
Abstract
For many, the Arctic’s harsh environment, remoteness, and sparse population are what make it so unique and beautiful. But these same qualities also make establishing reliable and fast telecommunications infrastructure in the region extremely difficult – particularly with regard to the North American Arctic. Indeed, these conditions make the installation of any telecommunications system, much less one with modern dependability and speed, an arduous undertaking. Yet connectivity is a necessity in the modern age and demands in the High North are only increasing. For example, governments and industry are seeking to expand services and operations northward as climate change opens up the once ice-locked region. In turn, locals aspire to interact with and take advantage of the opportunities of the wider world. Regardless of whether one appreciates or opposes the pace and forces behind northern development, Arctic telecommunications infrastructure – whether supplying basic services or facilitating personal and economic ambitions – is inadequate for both current and future demand.
Documents

Kuersten_ASC-Paper_0.pdf

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Arctic Telemedicine Project Final Report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100819
Source
Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies, University of Alaska Anchorage. August 2000.
Publication Type
Report
Date
Aug-2000
  1 website  
Author
Hild, CM
Author Affiliation
Arctic Telemedicine Project: Final report presented to the Sustainable Development Working Group of the Arctic Council
Source
Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies, University of Alaska Anchorage. August 2000.
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Alaska Federal Health Care Access Network (AFHCAN)
Alaska Telehealth Advisory Council
Arctic Council
Communication networks
Community interface
Extranet
Health professionals
Healthcare access
Internet
Intranet
Interoperability guidelines
Physical infrastructures
Software development
Sustainability planning
Telecommunications
Telemedicine
Training
Abstract
Accessing healthcare is a challenge for arctic residents when compared to the general populations of the eight nations making up this polar region. These far northern residents face physical difficulties, which include great distances, severe wind and cold, and extremes in light. These conditions can be demanding on the health of those who travel and can be harmful to the injured, ill, or infirm. In order for arctic communities to provide adequate healthcare, there must be a sustainable means of delivering this care at a distance. Telemedicine has been identified as the use of computers, telecommunication, and medical tools that allow physical parameters to be put into an electronic format. Although telemedicine is part of the larger telehealth concept, and is dependent on systems of telecommunication, it also involves tele-education and other distance delivery systems. The services that are needed and are being delivered at a distance are defining these remote arctic cities and villages as the "tele-community." Key contacts from each of the eight Arctic Council member nations and each of its four permanent participant indigenous people's groups provided insights and comments for the development of this report to Ministers.
Online Resources
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Arctic Telemedicine Project: Final report presented to the Sustainable Development Working Group of the Arctic Council

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100820
Source
Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies
Publication Type
Report
Date
Aug-2000
  1 website  
Author
Hild, CM
Source
Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Arctic Council
Community interface
Extranet
Health delivery
Health professionals
Internet
Intranet
Interoperability guidelines
Physical infrastructures
Telecommunications
Telehealth
Telemedicine
Training
Abstract
Accessing healthcare is a challenge for arctic residents when compared to the general populations of the eight nations making up this polar region. These far northern residents face physical difficulties, which include great distances, severe wind and cold, and extremes in light. These conditions can be demanding on the health of those who travel and can be harmful to the injured, ill, or infirm. In order for arctic communities to provide adequate healthcare, there must be a sustainable means of delivering this care at a distance. Telemedicine has been identified as the use of computers, telecommunication, and medical tools that allow physical parameters to be put into an electronic format. Although telemedicine is part of the larger telehealth concept, and is dependent on systems of telecommunication, it also involves tele-education and other distance delivery systems. The services that are needed and are being delivered at a distance are defining these remote arctic cities and villages as the "tele-community." Key contacts from each of the eight Arctic Council member nations and each of its four permanent participant indigenous people's groups provided insights and comments for the development of this report to Ministers.
Online Resources
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Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1993 Jan;44(1):81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1993
Author
L. Jerome
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1993 Jan;44(1):81
Date
Jan-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Family Therapy
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Ontario
Patient care team
Personality Assessment
Telecommunications
Television
Notes
Comment On: Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1992 Jan;43(1):25-321544643
PubMed ID
8436369 View in PubMed
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Cancer informational support and health care service use among individuals newly diagnosed: a mixed methods approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151758
Source
J Eval Clin Pract. 2009 Apr;15(2):346-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Sylvie Dubois
Carmen G Loiselle
Author Affiliation
Assistant Professor, Faculty of Nursing, Montreal University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. sylvie.dubois@umontreal.ca
Source
J Eval Clin Pract. 2009 Apr;15(2):346-59
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Anxiety
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - psychology
Canada
Female
Health Services - utilization
Humans
Information Storage and Retrieval - utilization
Information Systems - organization & administration
Male
Nurse-Patient Relations
Patient satisfaction
Prostatic Neoplasms - diagnosis - psychology
Referral and Consultation
Telecommunications
Abstract
To report on the integration of quantitative and qualitative findings to increase understanding of the role of cancer informational support and use of health care services among individuals newly diagnosed with breast or prostate cancer.
A mixed methods sequential design was used. First, a quantitative secondary analysis considered self-report data from a large number of individuals newly diagnosed with cancer (n = 250); next, a follow-up, in-depth qualitative inquiry with distinct individuals also newly diagnosed was conducted (n = 20); last, using a quantitative-hierarchical strategy, quantitative and qualitative findings were merged and re-analyzed.
Quantitative analyses showed significant relationships between informational support and health care services. For instance, individuals who received more intense cancer informational support [face-to-face and information technology (IT)] spent more time with nurses. Women with breast cancer as opposed to men with prostate cancer also were found to rely primarily on nurses for cancer information and information on health services available, whereas men relied mostly on their oncologists. In-depth interviews revealed that informational support could be construed as positive, unsupportive, or mixed depending on context. The mixed design analysis documented positive experiences for individuals who reported to be better prepared for consultations and treatments with information provided by more than one source. Negative experiences with physicians were reported by both women and men but the former was about quality of cancer information provided and the latter in terms of quantity.
A mixed methods approach allowed a deeper understanding of the role of informational support on subsequent use of health care services by individuals with cancer. Further studies may include other types of cancer and diverse background characteristics to clarify how informational support and subsequent use of health services may be jointly determined by these factors.
PubMed ID
19335496 View in PubMed
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101 records – page 1 of 11.