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Actor-network theory: a tool to support ethical analysis of commercial genetic testing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180338
Source
New Genet Soc. 2003 Dec;22(3):271-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Bryn Williams-Jones
Janice E Graham
Author Affiliation
Centre for Family Research & Homerton College, University of Cambridge, UK.
Source
New Genet Soc. 2003 Dec;22(3):271-96
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - genetics
Canada
Diffusion of Innovation
Female
Genes, BRCA1
Genes, BRCA2
Genetic Counseling
Genetic Research
Genetic Services - economics - ethics - trends
Genetic Testing - economics - ethics - methods
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Industry
Internationality
Marketing
Models, organizational
Patents as Topic
Private Sector
Public Policy
Public Sector
Research Support as Topic
Sensitivity and specificity
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Technology Transfer
Abstract
Social, ethical and policy analysis of the issues arising from gene patenting and commercial genetic testing is enhanced by the application of science and technology studies, and Actor-Network Theory (ANT) in particular. We suggest the potential for transferring ANT's flexible nature to an applied heuristic methodology for gathering empirical information and for analysing the complex networks involved in the development of genetic technologies. Three concepts are explored in this paper--actor-networks, translation, and drift--and applied to the case of Myriad Genetics and their commercial BRACAnalysis genetic susceptibility test for hereditary breast cancer. Treating this test as an active participant in socio-technical networks clarifies the extent to which it interacts with, shapes and is shaped by people, other technologies, and institutions. Such an understanding enables more sophisticated and nuanced technology assessment, academic analysis, as well as public debate about the social, ethical and policy implications of the commercialization of new genetic technologies.
PubMed ID
15115034 View in PubMed
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Adopting information technology in hospitals: the relationship between attitudes/expectations and behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217142
Source
Hosp Health Serv Adm. 1994;39(3):369-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
M. Hebert
I. Benbasat
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Hosp Health Serv Adm. 1994;39(3):369-83
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Attitude to Computers
Communication
Diffusion of Innovation
Hospital Bed Capacity, 300 to 499
Humans
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Research Design
Technology Transfer
Abstract
The purpose of this field study was to measure the influence of three factors on the adoption of information technology in a health care setting--namely, attitudes toward using the technology, subjective norms or beliefs about others' expectations, and perceived voluntariness. Approximately 77 percent of the variance of intent to use the technology was explained by three attitude variables (beliefs related to perceived relative advantage and compatibility with previous work patterns as well as result demonstrability), and one variable associated with subjective norms (influence of a senior policymaker, the director of nursing). Use of this model may provide insights for administrators managing the process of information technology implementation in health care.
PubMed ID
10137056 View in PubMed
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Alaska's model program for occupational injury prevention: Applying surveillance for effective public health practice

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5922
Source
Pages 714-723 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
, commercial fishing, air transport, and logging); 4) To use the on-site location as a "living laboratory" for conducting state-of-the-art injury surveillance, intervention trials, and demonstration projects; and 5) To promote worker injury prevention technology transfer to and from Alaska
  1 document  
Author
Conway, G.A
Lincoln, J.M
Husberg, B.J
Manwaring, JC
Bensyl, DM
Choromanski, DM
Author Affiliation
CDC/NIOSH/DSR, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA. GConway@cdc.gov
Source
Pages 714-723 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - mortality - prevention & control
Aircraft
Alaska - epidemiology
Humans
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
Population Surveillance
Public Health Practice
Registries
Technology Transfer
United States
Wounds and injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
BACKGROUND: NIOSH established its Alaska Field Station in Anchorage, Alaska, in 1991, after identifying Alaska as America's highest-risk state for traumatic worker fatalities. Since then, NIOSH established comprehensive occupational injury surveillance in Alaska, and formed and facilitated interagency working groups (of state and federal agencies) and industry, labor, and professional organizations to address major factors leading to occupational death and injury in the state. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive epidemiologic study of registry surveillance data obtained via direct on-site investigation of incidents and data-sharing with jurisdictional agencies. METHODS: We established a surveillance system, obtaining information via data-sharing with jurisdictional agencies and from direct on-site investigation of incidents. Also, we collaborate with state and regional government agencies, industry, workers, and non-governmental organizations to develop interventions. RESULTS: During 1991-1999, Alaska experienced a 50-percent overall decline in work-related deaths, including a substantial decline in commercial fishing deaths, and a very sharp decline in helicopter logging-related deaths. These efforts have lead to major national and international government-industry collaborative efforts in improving the safety of helicopter lift operations, and a concomitant improvement in fishing industry mortality rates among workers fishing Alaskan seas. CONCLUSIONS: Using surveillance data as information for action, these collaborative efforts have contributed to reducing Alaska's high occupational fatality rate. This reduction has been most clearly demonstrated in the rapidly expanding helicopter logging industry. The application of surveillance data also has played an important supportive role in the substantial progress made in reducing the mortality rate in Alaska's commercial fishing industry--historically, Alaska's (and America's) most dangerous industry, and the worst killer of Alaskan workers. Results suggest that extending Alaska's approach to occupational injury surveillance and prevention to other parts of the country, and application of these strategies to the entire spectrum of occupational injury hazards, could have a broad impact on reducing occupational injuries.
PubMed ID
11768453 View in PubMed
Documents
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Application of NASA's advanced life support technologies in polar regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4348
Source
Adv Space Res. 1997;20(10):2037-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
D L Bubenheim
C. Lewis
Author Affiliation
NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California 94035-1000, USA.
Source
Adv Space Res. 1997;20(10):2037-44
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Antarctic Regions
Arctic Regions
Ecological Systems, Closed
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Life Support Systems
Sanitation
Space Simulation
Technology Transfer
United States
United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration - trends
Waste Management - methods
Water Purification
Abstract
NASA's advanced life support technologies are being combined with Arctic science and engineering knowledge in the Advanced Life Systems for Extreme Environments (ALSEE) project. This project addresses treatment and reduction of waste, purification and recycling of water, and production of food in remote communities of Alaska. The project focus is a major issue in the state of Alaska and other areas of the Circumpolar North; the health and welfare of people, their lives and the subsistence lifestyle in remote communities, care for the environment, and economic opportunity through technology transfer. The challenge is to implement the technologies in a manner compatible with the social and economic structures of native communities, the state, and the commercial sector. NASA goals are technology selection, system design and methods development of regenerative life support systems for planetary and Lunar bases and other space exploration missions. The ALSEE project will provide similar advanced technologies to address the multiple problems facing the remote communities of Alaska and provide an extreme environment testbed for future space applications. These technologies have never been assembled for this purpose. They offer an integrated approach to solving pressing problems in remote communities.
PubMed ID
11542587 View in PubMed
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[Application of the strategic management approaches to implementation of space technologies in health services by the example of telemedicine].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186773
Source
Aviakosm Ekolog Med. 2002;36(5):57-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
O I Orlov
Source
Aviakosm Ekolog Med. 2002;36(5):57-9
Date
2002
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine - instrumentation
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Health Services - utilization
Humans
International Cooperation
Russia
Technology Transfer
Telemedicine - instrumentation
Abstract
Telemedicine serves as an argument for application of the strategic management technologies. A telemedicine implementation strategy has been developed to be introduced in the Russian health services.
PubMed ID
12572128 View in PubMed
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Balancing the collaboration equation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7515
Source
Science. 2000 Jun 23;288(5474):2155-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-23-2000

The Canadian Bacterial Diseases Network: a collaboration of universities, industry and government.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215934
Source
Trends Microbiol. 1995 Feb;3(2):40-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1995

The "Canadian model" in the international context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184894
Source
Healthc Pap. 2000;1(4):103-7, discussion 109-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
M. Hirschfeld
Author Affiliation
Long-Term Care, World Health Organization, Geneva,Switzerland.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2000;1(4):103-7, discussion 109-12
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Participation
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated
Developing Countries
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Internationality
Models, organizational
National health programs - organization & administration
Needs Assessment
Poverty
Technology Transfer
World Health Organization
Abstract
The focus of this commentary is on the relevance of the Canadian experience for developing countries. It highlights the growing urgency poor countries face in preserving their major human and social capital--community solidarity and family care. Developing countries face a double burden of disease--communicable and non-communicable diseases alike, with very few, and often shrinking, resources. While poorer countries will be able to learn about the essential elements of home-based care from the examples of Canada and other industrialized countries, they do need to develop their own systems based upon their economic, social, political and cultural realities. The primary health care system would seem to provide a foundation for the provision of long-term care on a sustainable and cost-effective basis. In contrast to the often-prevailing practice in developed countries, home-based care services could be integrated into the overall health and social system. Functional disability, regardless of disease aetiology or age of the care recipient, as well as the needs of family caregivers would thus become the defining elements of service eligibility. While the question remains open as to how much poor countries can learn from the experience of others, developing countries do have the opportunity to initiate a rational process where they first provide support to communities and informal caregivers and help to maintain patients in their homes and only later develop other service elements.
Notes
Comment On: Healthc Pap. 2000 Fall;1(4):9-3612811170
PubMed ID
12811182 View in PubMed
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Clinical nurse specialists' use of evidence in practice: a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163154
Source
Worldviews Evid Based Nurs. 2007;4(2):86-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Joanne Profetto-McGrath
Karen Bulmer Smith
Kylie Hugo
Michael Taylor
Hannan El-Hajj
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, Knowledge Utilization Studies Program (KUSP), and Centre for Knowledge Transfer, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. joanne.profetto-mcgrath@ualberta.ca
Source
Worldviews Evid Based Nurs. 2007;4(2):86-96
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Attitude of Health Personnel
Communication
Decision Making
Diffusion of Innovation
Electronic Mail
Evidence-Based Medicine - education - organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Information Dissemination
Internet
Interprofessional Relations
Job Description
Nurse Clinicians - education - organization & administration - psychology
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Research - education - organization & administration
Organizational Culture
Pilot Projects
Professional Competence
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Technology Transfer
Time Factors
Abstract
The interest in finding ways to bridge the gap between nursing research and implementation of findings into practice has been increasing. Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) may be a bridge between frontline nurses and current developments in practice. While several researchers have studied the use of evidence by nurses in general, no known studies have been focused specifically on the use of evidence by CNSs.
The purpose of this pilot study was to develop an understanding of the sources, nature, and application of evidence used by CNSs in practice and to investigate the feasibility of conducting a qualitative study focused on the CNS role in relation to evidence use in practice.
This pilot study is a descriptive exploratory design in the qualitative paradigm. Seven CNSs from a large Western Canadian health region were interviewed. Interview transcripts were reviewed for recurrent themes about sources of evidence, evidence use, and barriers and facilitators to evidence use.
CNSs access and use evidence from a variety of sources. All CNSs indicated that research literature was a primary source of evidence and research was used in decision-making. Peers and experience were also important sources of evidence. CNSs used the Internet extensively to consult research databases, online sources of evidence, and to contact peers about current practice. CNSs also gathered evidence from frontline nurses, healthcare team members, and families before decision-making. The choice of evidence often depended upon the type of question they were attempting to answer. Barriers cited by CNSs support previous research and included lack of time, resources, and receptivity at clinical and organizational levels. Facilitators included peers, organizational support, and advanced education.
CNSs in Canada have advanced education and clinical expertise and many are employed in roles that permeate organizational management and clinical nursing care. It is suggested that qualitative research in naturalized settings that investigates the role of CNSs in relation to the dissemination of evidence in nursing practice needs attention.
PubMed ID
17553109 View in PubMed
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Collaboration to change the landscape of nursing: a journey between urban and remote practice settings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143602
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 May;23 Spec No 2010:90-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Mary Ferguson-Paré
Claire Mallette
Baiba Zarins
Susan McLeod
Kelly Reuben
Author Affiliation
University Health Network, Toronto, ON.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 May;23 Spec No 2010:90-100
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Competence
Community Networks - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Diffusion of Innovation
Health Manpower
Health planning
Humans
Leadership
Long-Term Care
Nursing - manpower - organization & administration
Nursing Evaluation Research
Ontario
Organizational Culture
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover
Program Development
Remote Consultation
Rural Health Services - manpower - organization & administration
Staff Development
Technology Transfer
Universities
Abstract
University Health Network (UHN) became a demonstration site to test a health human resource planning model to foster inter-organizational collaboration, knowledge transfer and exchange of nurses between an urban academic health science centre and a remote region in northern Ontario. Funding support was provided by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. The partnership between UHN, Weeneebayko Health Ahtuskaywin (WHA) and James Bay General Hospital (JBGH) addressed retention, recruitment, professional practice development, planning and succession planning objectives. The primary goal of this partnership was to supply the staffing needs of WHA/JBGH with UHN nurses at a decreased cost for four- to six-week placement periods. This resulted in a marked decrease in agency use by approximately 40% in the WHA site during the months UHN nurses were practicing in the north, with an overall agency cost savings of $165,000 reported in the pilot year. The project also served as a recruitment and retention strategy for all organizations. It provided an opportunity to practice in new clinical settings and to engage in knowledge transfer experiences and professional development initiatives between remote and urban practice environments. In the pilot year, 37 nurses (30 from UHN and 7 from WHA) participated. They returned to their respective organizations re-energized by the different "landscape" of practice experience and toward the nursing profession itself.
PubMed ID
20463448 View in PubMed
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40 records – page 1 of 4.