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812 records – page 1 of 82.

Source
Sygeplejersken. 1988 Aug 24;88(34):34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-24-1988

35 years of marine natural product research in Sweden: Cool molecules and models from cold waters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283493
Source
Prog Mol Subcell Biol. 2017;55:1-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Lars Bohlin
Paco Cárdenas
Anders Backlund
Ulf Göransson
Source
Prog Mol Subcell Biol. 2017;55:1-34
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Aquatic Organisms - chemistry - genetics
Biological Products - chemistry - therapeutic use
Biomedical Research - trends
Cold Temperature
Marine Biology - trends
Oceans and Seas
Porifera - chemistry - genetics
Sweden
Technology, Pharmaceutical - trends
Abstract
Currents efforts in marine biodiscovery have essentially focused on temperate to tropical shallow water organisms. With more than 6000 species of marine plants and animals, the Kosterfjord area has the richest marine biodiversity in Swedish waters, but it remains understudied. The overall objective of our marine pharmacognosy research is to explore and reveal the pharmacological potential of organisms from this poorly explored region. More generally, we wish to understand aspects of structure-activity relationships of chemical interactions in cold-water marine environment (shallow and deep). Our strategy is based on ecologically guided search for compounds through studies of physiology and organism interactions coupled to identification of bioactive molecules guided by especially in vivo assays. The research programme originated in the beginning of the 1980s with a broad screening of Swedish marine organisms using both in vitro and in vivo assays, resulting in isolation and identification of several different bioactive molecules. Two congenerous cyclopeptides, i.e. barettin and 8,9-dihydrobarettin, were isolated from the deep-sea sponge Geodia barretti, and structurally elucidated, guided by their antifouling activity and their affinity to a selection of human serotonin receptors. To optimize the activity a number of analogues of barettin were synthezised and tested for antifouling activity. Within the EU project BlueGenics, two larger homologous peptides, barrettides A and B, were isolated from G. baretti. Also, metabolic fingerprinting combined with sponge systematics was used to further study deep-sea natural product diversity in the genus Geodia. Finally, the chemical property space model 'ChemGPS-NP' has been developed and used in our research group, enabling a more efficient use of obtained compounds and exploration of possible biological activities and targets. Another approach is the broad application of phylogenetic frameworks, which can be used in prediction of where-in which organisms-to search for novel molecules or better sources of known molecules in marine organisms. In a further perspective, the deeper understanding of evolution and development of life on Earth can also provide answers to why marine organisms produce specific molecules.
PubMed ID
28238034 View in PubMed
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Abdominal aortic aneurysm: endovascular grafts offer a potential alternative to surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191802
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 1998 Jan;(2):1-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 1998 Jan;(2):1-3
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - surgery
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - economics - methods
Canada
Clinical Trials as Topic
Direct Service Costs
Humans
Stents
Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive - adverse effects - economics - methods
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Endovascular grafts are a new, experimental surgery for AAAs that alleviates the need for open abdominal surgery. They offer an important alternative for high risk patients who would be at a greater risk with the more invasive surgical procedure. However, this is based on limited evidence, and more randomized controlled trials are needed. The procedure may be cheaper than open surgery, because of the lengthy hospital stay and operating room time with the latter, provided that the costs of the devices are low enough. However, there is insufficient data on the outcomes with endovascular grafts in different patient groups. As with many new or minimally invasive techniques, there is a "learning curve" which will affect costs and outcomes. Endovascular grafting is no exception, and repeated practical applications are needed for competence, expertise and good outcomes. Continued monitoring of this technique is needed. A registry of elective AAA patients now has 10-year follow-up data on about a third of the Canadian patients operated on in 1988. Further development of such registries will provide more accurate information on success rates, costs, and long-term complications.
PubMed ID
11811206 View in PubMed
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Acrylamide-asparagine relationship in baked/toasted wheat and rye breads.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156290
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2008 Aug;25(8):921-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Kit Granby
Nikoline Juul Nielsen
Rikke V Hedegaard
Tue Christensen
Mette Kann
Leif H Skibsted
Author Affiliation
Technical University of Denmark, National food Institute, Søborg, DK-2860, Denmark. kgr@food.dtu.dk
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2008 Aug;25(8):921-9
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - analysis
Asparagine - analysis
Bread - analysis
Carcinogens - analysis
Cooking - methods
Denmark
Diet
Flour
Food Technology - methods
Hot Temperature
Humans
Maillard Reaction
Risk Assessment - methods
Secale cereale
Triticum
Abstract
Acrylamide in baked and toasted wheat and rye bread was studied in relation to levels of asparagine in flour, dough, bread and toasts. Asparagine was consumed during bread preparation resulting in reduced acrylamide content in the products. In wheat bread, 12% of the asparagine initially present in the flour (0.14 g kg(-1)) remained after yeast fermentation and baking; for rye bread, 82% of asparagine remained after sourdough fermentation and baking. Asparagine present in untoasted wheat bread had totally reacted after hard toasting. Toasted wheat and rye bread slices contained 11-161 and 27-205 microg kg(-1) acrylamide, respectively, compared to untoasted wheat and rye bread with
PubMed ID
18608496 View in PubMed
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Actor-network theory: a tool to support ethical analysis of commercial genetic testing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180338
Source
New Genet Soc. 2003 Dec;22(3):271-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Bryn Williams-Jones
Janice E Graham
Author Affiliation
Centre for Family Research & Homerton College, University of Cambridge, UK.
Source
New Genet Soc. 2003 Dec;22(3):271-96
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - genetics
Canada
Diffusion of Innovation
Female
Genes, BRCA1
Genes, BRCA2
Genetic Counseling
Genetic Research
Genetic Services - economics - ethics - trends
Genetic Testing - economics - ethics - methods
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Industry
Internationality
Marketing
Models, organizational
Patents as Topic
Private Sector
Public Policy
Public Sector
Research Support as Topic
Sensitivity and specificity
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Technology Transfer
Abstract
Social, ethical and policy analysis of the issues arising from gene patenting and commercial genetic testing is enhanced by the application of science and technology studies, and Actor-Network Theory (ANT) in particular. We suggest the potential for transferring ANT's flexible nature to an applied heuristic methodology for gathering empirical information and for analysing the complex networks involved in the development of genetic technologies. Three concepts are explored in this paper--actor-networks, translation, and drift--and applied to the case of Myriad Genetics and their commercial BRACAnalysis genetic susceptibility test for hereditary breast cancer. Treating this test as an active participant in socio-technical networks clarifies the extent to which it interacts with, shapes and is shaped by people, other technologies, and institutions. Such an understanding enables more sophisticated and nuanced technology assessment, academic analysis, as well as public debate about the social, ethical and policy implications of the commercialization of new genetic technologies.
PubMed ID
15115034 View in PubMed
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Adopting information technology in hospitals: the relationship between attitudes/expectations and behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217142
Source
Hosp Health Serv Adm. 1994;39(3):369-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
M. Hebert
I. Benbasat
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Hosp Health Serv Adm. 1994;39(3):369-83
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Attitude to Computers
Communication
Diffusion of Innovation
Hospital Bed Capacity, 300 to 499
Humans
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Research Design
Technology Transfer
Abstract
The purpose of this field study was to measure the influence of three factors on the adoption of information technology in a health care setting--namely, attitudes toward using the technology, subjective norms or beliefs about others' expectations, and perceived voluntariness. Approximately 77 percent of the variance of intent to use the technology was explained by three attitude variables (beliefs related to perceived relative advantage and compatibility with previous work patterns as well as result demonstrability), and one variable associated with subjective norms (influence of a senior policymaker, the director of nursing). Use of this model may provide insights for administrators managing the process of information technology implementation in health care.
PubMed ID
10137056 View in PubMed
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Adopting new medical technologies in Russian hospitals: what causes inefficiency? (qualitative study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294591
Source
Health Econ Policy Law. 2018 Jan; 13(1):33-49
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2018
Author
Sergey Shishkin
Liudmila Zasimova
Author Affiliation
1Director,Center for Health Policy,National Research University Higher School of Economics,Moscow,Russia.
Source
Health Econ Policy Law. 2018 Jan; 13(1):33-49
Date
Jan-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Biomedical Technology
Decision Making
Diffusion of Innovation
Efficiency, Organizational
Faculty, Medical
Hospital Administrators
Hospitals
Humans
Russia
Abstract
The adoption of new medical technologies often generates losses in efficiency associated with the excess or insufficient acquisition of new equipment, an inappropriate choice (in terms of economic and clinical parameters) of medical equipment, and its poor use. Russia is a good example for exploring the problem of the ineffective adoption of new medical technologies due to the massive public investment in new equipment for medical institutions in 2006-2013. This study examines the procurement of new technologies in Russian hospitals to find the main causes of inefficiency. The research strategy was based on in-depth semistructured interviews with representatives of prominent actors (regional health care authorities, hospital executives, senior physicians). The main result is that inefficiencies arise from the contradiction between hospitals' and authorities' motivation for acquiring new technologies: hospitals tend to adopt technologies which bring benefits to their department heads and physicians and minimize maintenance and servicing costs, while the authorities' main concern is the initial cost of the technology.
PubMed ID
28249636 View in PubMed
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The adoption of new endodontic technology amongst Danish general dental practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176908
Source
Int Endod J. 2005 Jan;38(1):52-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
L. Bjørndal
C. Reit
Author Affiliation
Department of Cariology and Endodontics, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. lb@odont.ku.dk
Source
Int Endod J. 2005 Jan;38(1):52-8
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Dentist's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Diffusion of Innovation
Endodontics - instrumentation
Female
General Practice, Dental - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Office visits - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Root Canal Obturation - methods
Root Canal Preparation - instrumentation
Rubber Dams - utilization
Technology, Dental - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To assess the adoption of new endodontic technology in a population of Danish practitioners.
Members of the Copenhagen Dental Association (n = 1156) were approached with a questionnaire concerning the frequency of various endodontic procedures. Three options were available: often, occasionally and never. Responses were anonymous. The statistical analyses were performed as studies of association in two- or three-way contingency tables, and with Goodman-Kruskal's gamma-coefficient as the basic tool chosen.
Only data from general practitioners (GPs) in private practice were analysed (n = 956). The response rate was 72%. NiTi hand instruments were often used to negotiate canals by 18%, whilst 10% often used NiTi rotary systems. Electronic apex locators were often employed by 15%. Nineteen per cent reported that warm gutta-percha was often used. A majority (53%) often spend two sessions to instrument a molar, and 20% often needed three or more sessions to finish the shaping phase. To complete a treatment of a nonvital case most practitioners reported to use at least three appointments. Only 4% frequently applied rubber dam.
The adoption of new endodontic technology is at an early stage amongst Danish GPs. A new revised remuneration system might influence the rate of adoption, allowing the practitioners to act more rationally and produce a higher frequency of good-quality root fillings. Progress towards high quality endodontics might be hindered by the nonuse of rubber dam.
PubMed ID
15606824 View in PubMed
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Advances in food systems for space flight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193369
Source
Life Support Biosph Sci. 1998;5(1):71-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
C T Bourland
Author Affiliation
NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058, USA. cbourlan@ems.jsc.nasa.gov
Source
Life Support Biosph Sci. 1998;5(1):71-7
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ecological Systems, Closed
Food Packaging - trends
Food Preservation
Food Technology - trends
Food, Formulated
Humans
International Cooperation
Life Support Systems
Nutritional Requirements
Russia
Space Flight - trends
United States
Weightlessness
Abstract
Food for space has evolved from cubes and tubes to normal Earth-like food consumed with common utensils. U.S. space food systems have traditionally been based upon the water supply. When on-board water was abundant (e.g., Apollo and Shuttle fuel cells produced water) then dehydrated food was used extensively. The International Space Station will have limited water available for food rehydration so there is little advantage for using dehydrated foods. Experience from Skylab and the Russian Mir space station emphasizes that food variety and quality are important elements in the design of food for closed systems. The evolution of space food has accentuated Earth-like foods, which should be a model for closed environment food systems.
PubMed ID
11540467 View in PubMed
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Adverse pregnancy outcomes in offspring of fathers working in biomedical research laboratories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82224
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2006 Jun;49(6):468-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Magnusson Linda L
Bodin Lennart
Wennborg Helena
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences and Nutrition at Novum, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. linda.magnusson@biosciki.se
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2006 Jun;49(6):468-73
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biomedical Technology
Birth weight
Female
Humans
Laboratories
Logistic Models
Male
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Paternal Exposure - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Registries
Solvents - adverse effects
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Laboratory work may constitute a possible health hazard for workers as well as for their offspring, and involves a wide range of exposures, such as organic solvents, carcinogenic agents, ionizing radiation, and/or microbiological agents. Adverse pregnancy outcomes in the offspring of male employees in biomedical research laboratories are examined. METHODS: Offspring to males employed 1970-1989 at four Swedish universities were identified via the Medical Birth Register (MBR), along with other pregnancy parameters. Offspring of fathers with laboratory work (n = 2,281) is considered exposed, and of non-laboratory employees unexposed (n = 1,909). Exposure data were obtained by questionnaires to research group leaders. Logistic regression analysis estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: Paternal laboratory work in general showed no statistically significant increased ORs concerning birth weight and/or gestational age, but work specifically with radioactive isotopes gave OR 1.8 (CI 1.0-3.2) for high birth weight and a relative risk of 1.2 (CI 1.0-1.4) for sex ratio (male/female). CONCLUSIONS: There was no clear association between periconceptional paternal laboratory work and adverse reproductive outcomes, but use of radioactive isotopes showed increased OR for high birth weight in offspring.
PubMed ID
16691607 View in PubMed
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812 records – page 1 of 82.