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130 records – page 1 of 13.

Addressing oral disease--the case for tobacco cessation services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194963
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2001 Mar;67(3):141-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
H S Campbell
E H Simpson
T L Petty
P A Jennett
Author Affiliation
Centre for Behavioural Research and Program Evaluation, Lyle S. Hallman Institute, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. W., Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1. sharoncm@healthy.uwaterloo.ca
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2001 Mar;67(3):141-4
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Dental Care
Goals
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Insurance Claim Reporting
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Periodontal Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Plants, Toxic
Referral and Consultation
Societies, Dental
Teaching Materials
Tobacco - adverse effects
Tobacco Use Cessation - methods
Abstract
There is strong scientific evidence from clinical and epidemiological studies that tobacco use, particularly cigarette smoking, is linked to periodontal disease as well as other serious but less common oral health diseases. Given the strength of this evidence, dentists must include tobacco cessation services (TCS) as part of their routine care. This paper describes barriers to the adoption of TCS as identified by Alberta dentists participating in a randomized intervention trial and discusses strategies for overcoming these barriers. As well, suggestions are made to professional associations and educational institutes on ways to increase the incorporation of tobacco cessation into professional practice standards.
Notes
Comment In: J Can Dent Assoc. 2001 Mar;67(3):12711315384
PubMed ID
11315392 View in PubMed
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The Alberta Ambassador Program: delivering Health Technology Assessment results to rural practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169962
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2006;6:21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Saifudin Rashiq
Pamela Barton
Christa Harstall
Donald Schopflocher
Paul Taenzer
Author Affiliation
Division of Pain Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton AB, Canada. srashiq@ualberta.ca
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2006;6:21
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Chronic Disease
Decision Making
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Evidence-Based Medicine - education
Humans
Pain Management
Physician's Practice Patterns
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Regional Medical Programs
Rural Health Services - standards
Teaching - methods
Teaching Materials
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Abstract
The purpose of Health Technology Assessment (HTA) is to make the best possible summary of the evidence regarding specific health interventions in order to influence health care and policy decisions. The need for decision makers to find relevant HTA data when it is needed is a barrier to its usefulness. These barriers are highest in rural areas and amongst isolated practitioners.
A multidisciplinary team developed an interactive case-based instructional strategy on the topic of chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) management using clinical evidence derived by HTA. The evidence for each of 18 CNCP interventions was distilled into single-sheet summaries. Clinicians and HTA specialists ('Ambassadors') conducted 11 two-hour interactive sessions on CNCP in eight of Alberta's nine health regions. Pre- and post-session evaluations were conducted.
The sessions were attended by 130 individuals representing 14 health and administrative disciplines. The ambassador model was well received. The use of content experts as ambassadors was highly rated. The educational strategy was judged to be effective. Awareness of the best evidence in CNCP management was increased. Although some participants reported practice changes as a result of the workshops, the program was not designed to measure changes in patient outcome.
The ambassador program was successful in increasing awareness of the best evidence in CNCP management, and positively influenced treatment decisions. Its teaching methods were felt to be unique and innovative by participants. Its methods could be applied to other clinical content areas in order to increase the uptake of the results of HTA.
Notes
Cites: J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2002 Fall;22(4):214-2112613056
Cites: J Health Soc Policy. 2002;15(3-4):23-3712705462
Cites: BMJ. 1998 Jul 25;317(7153):273-69677226
Cites: J Eval Clin Pract. 2003 Nov;9(4):385-9014758960
Cites: J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2004 Spring;24(2):68-7515279131
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Oct 11;362(9391):1225-3014568747
PubMed ID
16579855 View in PubMed
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Alcohol risk assessment and intervention for family physicians. Project of the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212298
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1996 Apr;42:681-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
C. Peters
D. Wilson
A. Bruneau
P. Butt
S. Hart
J. Mayhew
Author Affiliation
Hotel Dieu Family, Medicine Centre Queen's University, Kingston, Ont.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1996 Apr;42:681-9
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - diagnosis - therapy
Canada
Education, Medical, Continuing
Family Practice - education - methods
Humans
Mass Screening
Physician's Role
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Societies, Medical
Teaching Materials
Abstract
At-risk and problem drinkers (excluding those with severe dependency) are estimated to be 20% of the Canadian population. With minimal training family physicians can effectively manage patients with alcohol problems. The Alcohol Risk Assessment and Intervention Project of the College of Family Physicians of Canada has developed materials and training for family physicians to use in helping their patients reduce the risks of alcohol-related harm.
Notes
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 1984 Jun;52(3):390-4036747058
Cites: CMAJ. 1995 Mar 15;152(6):851-97697578
Cites: Alcohol. 1985 May-Jun;2(3):545-92862882
Cites: Br J Addict. 1986 Jun;81(3):353-633461846
Cites: JAMA. 1988 May 20;259(19):2883-93367456
Cites: Br J Addict. 1990 Feb;85(2):169-772317584
Cites: CMAJ. 1990 Nov 15;143(10):1054-92224673
Cites: CMAJ. 1990 Nov 15;143(10):1060-92224674
Cites: Hypertension. 1992 Jan;19(1):79-841346121
Cites: Br J Addict. 1992 Jun;87(6):891-9001525531
Cites: Am Psychol. 1992 Sep;47(9):1102-141329589
Cites: Addiction. 1993 Mar;88(3):315-358461850
Cites: Addiction. 1993 Jun;88(6):791-8048329970
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1993 Sep;39:1986-8, 1991-38219846
Cites: Addiction. 1994 Jan;89(1):35-408148742
Cites: JAMA. 1984 Oct 12;252(14):1905-76471323
PubMed ID
8653036 View in PubMed
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American Indian and Alaska Native cancer resources.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4096
Source
Cancer Pract. 1994 Nov-Dec;2(6):447-9
Publication Type
Article

American Society for Circumpolar Health. Comparison of mercury in selected subsistence foods from western Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4462
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 Dec;62(4):448
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003

American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) survey of radiation biology educators in U.S. and Canadian radiation oncology residency programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148696
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2009 Nov 1;75(3):896-905
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2009
Author
Barry S Rosenstein
Kathryn D Held
Sara Rockwell
Jacqueline P Williams
Elaine M Zeman
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave Levy Place, New York, NY 10029, USA. barry.rosenstein@mssm.edu
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2009 Nov 1;75(3):896-905
Date
Nov-1-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation - standards
Age Factors
Aging
Biophysics - education - manpower
Canada
Educational Measurement - methods - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Faculty, Medical - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Forecasting
Humans
Internship and Residency - organization & administration - standards
Mentors
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Radiation Oncology - education - manpower - organization & administration - trends
Radiobiology - education - manpower - organization & administration - trends
Research - statistics & numerical data
Societies, Medical - standards
Teaching - manpower - organization & administration - trends
Teaching Materials - supply & distribution
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
To obtain, in a survey-based study, detailed information on the faculty currently responsible for teaching radiation biology courses to radiation oncology residents in the United States and Canada.
In March-December 2007 a survey questionnaire was sent to faculty having primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to residents in 93 radiation oncology residency programs in the United States and Canada.
The responses to this survey document the aging of the faculty who have primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to radiation oncology residents. The survey found a dramatic decline with time in the percentage of educators whose graduate training was in radiation biology. A significant number of the educators responsible for teaching radiation biology were not fully acquainted with the radiation sciences, either through training or practical application. In addition, many were unfamiliar with some of the organizations setting policies and requirements for resident education. Freely available tools, such as the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Radiation and Cancer Biology Practice Examination and Study Guides, were widely used by residents and educators. Consolidation of resident courses or use of a national radiation biology review course was viewed as unlikely by most programs.
A high priority should be given to the development of comprehensive teaching tools to assist those individuals who have responsibility for teaching radiation biology courses but who do not have an extensive background in critical areas of radiobiology related to radiation oncology. These findings also suggest a need for new graduate programs in radiobiology.
Notes
Cites: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1992;24(5):847-91447014
Cites: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1996 Jul 1;35(4):821-68690652
Cites: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1999 Aug 1;45(1):153-6110477019
Cites: Radiat Res. 2007 Aug;168(2):262-517722362
Cites: Radiat Res. 2003 Dec;160(6):729-3714640790
Cites: Acad Radiol. 2000 Mar;7(3):176-8310730813
Cites: Radiat Res. 2002 May;157(5):599-60611966327
Cites: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2002 Nov 1;54(3):861-7212377340
Cites: J Am Coll Radiol. 2008 Oct;5(10):1077-918812152
PubMed ID
19733012 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of breastfeeding promotion literature: does it really promote breastfeeding?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221961
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Jan-Feb;84(1):24-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
R K Valaitis
E. Shea
Author Affiliation
McMaster University School of Nursing, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Jan-Feb;84(1):24-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Breast Feeding
Canada
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Guidelines as Topic - standards
Health Education - standards
Health Promotion - standards
Humans
Pamphlets
Reading
Teaching Materials - standards
World Health Organization
Abstract
Breastfeeding pamphlets are being produced for new mothers by both commercial and nonprofit sources in increasing quantities. A regional lactation committee decided to evaluate these materials on the basis of accuracy, degree of positive approach to breastfeeding, readability and compliance with the WHO/UNICEF Code on the Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes. Results indicate that materials produced by non-profit sources scored higher in positive approach accuracy and WHO Code compliance compared with commercial sources. Only 2 of 22 pamphlets in the sample were written within the recommended reading level of Grade 5-8. None of the materials met all of the criteria for good promotional breastfeeding literature.
PubMed ID
8500052 View in PubMed
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Assessment of the Mission Nutrition nutrition education program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182384
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2003;64(4):214-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Laurie Ricciuto
Helen Haresign
Valerie Steele
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, ON.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2003;64(4):214-6
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Child
Curriculum
Faculty
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Nutritional Sciences - education
Teaching - methods
Teaching Materials - supply & distribution
Abstract
In 1998, Dietitians of Canada and the team of registered dietitians at Kellogg Canada Inc. partnered to develop Mission Nutrition, a national bilingual nutrition education program that provides curriculum-based resources to teachers. The main objectives of this study were to measure the awareness and utility of the Mission Nutrition program among elementary teachers, and to identify opportunities to enhance the Mission Nutrition resources to increase use. A ten-minute telephone survey was conducted with a representative sample of 203 elementary school teachers. A sub-sample of 20 teachers then participated in a more in-depth 30-minute telephone survey. A need for increased promotion of the Mission Nutrition program was identified on the basis of the 22% awareness among teachers participating in the initial interview. All teachers who had used the educator guides and student activity sheets reported that they would use them again. Teachers found that the Mission Nutrition materials were well-researched and contained useful activities relevant to students. The findings indicate that, to be most effective, nutrition education resources should be provided in a ready-to-use format and integrated with core curricula. Teachers also suggested that materials should include fresh ideas to engage students at different grade levels, and ways to involve parents. Dietitians are ideally positioned to work collaboratively with educators to develop these types of nutrition education resources.
PubMed ID
14675503 View in PubMed
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Automated lung sound analysis in patients with pneumonia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177158
Source
Respir Care. 2004 Dec;49(12):1490-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Raymond L H Murphy
Andrey Vyshedskiy
Verna-Ann Power-Charnitsky
Dhirendra S Bana
Patricia M Marinelli
Anna Wong-Tse
Rozanne Paciej
Author Affiliation
Brigham and Women's/Faulkner Hospital, 1153 Centre Street, Suite 40, Boston MA 02130, USA. rmurphy@faulknerhospital.org
Source
Respir Care. 2004 Dec;49(12):1490-7
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Auscultation - methods
Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted - instrumentation - methods
Equipment Design
Female
Finland
Hospitals, Community
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Male
Observer Variation
Pneumonia - diagnosis
Software
Stethoscopes
Teaching Materials
Abstract
To determine whether objectively detected lung sounds were significantly different in patients with pneumonia than those in asymptomatic subjects, and to quantify the pneumonia findings for teaching purposes.
At a community teaching hospital we used a multi-channel lung sound analyzer to examine a learning sample of 50 patients diagnosed with pneumonia and 50 control subjects. Automated quantification and characterization of the lung sounds commonly recognized to be associated with pneumonia were used to generate an "acoustic pneumonia score." These were examined in the learning sample and then prospectively tested in 50 patients and 50 controls.
The acoustic pneumonia score averaged 13 in the learning sample and 11 in the test sample of pneumonia patients. The scores were 2 and 3 in the controls. The positive predictive value of a score higher than 6 was 0.94 in the learning sample and 0.87 in the test sample. The sensitivities in the 2 groups were 0.90 and 0.78, and the specificities were 0.94 and 0.88, respectively. Adventitious sounds were more common in pneumonia patients (inspiratory crackles 81% vs 28%, expiratory crackles 65% vs 9%, rhonchi 19% vs 0%).
Our lung sound analyzer found significant differences between lung sounds in patients with pneumonia and in asymptomatic controls. Computerized lung sound analysis can provide objective evidence supporting the diagnosis of pneumonia. We believe that the lung-sound data produced by our device will help to teach physical diagnosis.
Notes
Comment In: Respir Care. 2004 Dec;49(12):1488-915571638
PubMed ID
15571639 View in PubMed
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Brief research report: uncertainty-inducing and reassuring facts about HPV: a descriptive study of French Canadian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148631
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Oct;30(10):892-902
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Natalie O Rosen
Bärbel Knäuper
Gabrielle Pagé
Pasqualina Di Dio
Eleshia Morrison
Marie-Hélène Mayrand
Eduardo L Franco
Zeev Rosberger
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, B3A 1B1, Canada. natalie.rosen@mcgill.ca
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Oct;30(10):892-902
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Humans
Mass Screening - methods - psychology
Middle Aged
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Pamphlets
Papillomavirus Infections - diagnosis
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Patient Education as Topic - methods - standards
Quebec
Teaching Materials - standards
Uncertainty
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - pathology - prevention & control - virology
Vaginal Smears - psychology
Women - education - psychology
Abstract
We sought to describe information that makes women feel (1) uncertain and (2) reassured about their human papillomavirus (HPV) status and the potential health implications of an HPV DNA test result and (3) to examine information seeking after receiving their result. Thirty women (previously tested HPV negative) read factual information on HPV and cervical cancer and were asked which facts were uncertainty inducing and which were reassuring. Twenty-four facts reassured women of their HPV negative status, 11 facts made women feel uncertain, and 10 facts made them feel both. The most common reason for seeking information in the future was receiving a positive test result. The authors outline what specific facts about HPV health providers can emphasize to alleviate anxiety and encourage women to feel reassured of their low cancer risk following a negative test result.
PubMed ID
19742363 View in PubMed
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130 records – page 1 of 13.