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7 records – page 1 of 1.

Aluminium in foodstuffs and diets in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59663
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1992 Jan;194(1):38-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1992
Author
L. Jorhem
G. Haegglund
Author Affiliation
Chemistry Division 2, National Food Administration, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1992 Jan;194(1):38-42
Date
Jan-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum - administration & dosage - analysis
Animals
Beverages - analysis
Cereals - chemistry
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Meat - analysis
Milk - analysis
Shellfish - analysis
Sweden
Tea - chemistry
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
The levels of aluminium have been determined in a number of individual foodstuffs on the Swedish market and in 24 h duplicate diets collected by women living in the Stockholm area. The results show that the levels in most foods are very low and that the level in vegetables can vary by a factor 10. Beverages from aluminium cans were found to have aluminium levels not markedly different from those in glass bottles. Based on the results of the analysis of individual foods, the average Swedish daily diet was calculated to contain about 0.6 mg aluminium, whereas the mean content of the collected duplicate diets was 13 mg. A cake made from a mix containing aluminium phosphate in the baking soda was identified as the most important contributor of aluminium to the duplicate diets. Tea and aluminium utensils were estimated to increase the aluminium content of the diets by approximately 4 and 2 mg/day, respectively. The results also indicate that a considerable amount of aluminium must be introduced from other sources.
PubMed ID
1542992 View in PubMed
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Beverage caffeine intakes in young children in Canada and the US.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168912
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2006;67(2):96-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Carol A Knight
Ian Knight
Diane C Mitchell
Author Affiliation
Knight International, Chicago, IL, USA.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2006;67(2):96-9
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Caffeine - administration & dosage - analysis
Canada
Carbonated Beverages - analysis
Central Nervous System Stimulants - administration & dosage - analysis
Child, Preschool
Coffee - chemistry
Diet Surveys
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Tea - chemistry
United States
Abstract
Throughout childhood there is a shift from predominantly milk-based beverage consumption to other types of beverages, including those containing caffeine. Although a variety of health effects in children and adults have been attributed to caffeine, few data exist on caffeine intake in children aged one to five years.
Because beverages provide about 80% of total caffeine consumed in children of this age group, beverage consumption patterns and caffeine intakes were evaluated from two beverage marketing surveys: the 2001 Canadian Facts study and the 1999 United States Share of Intake Panel study.
Considerably fewer Canadian children than American children consume caffeinated beverages (36% versus 56%); Canadian children consume approximately half the amount of caffeine (7 versus 14 mg/day in American children). Differences were largely because of higher intakes of carbonated soft drinks in the US.
Caffeine intakes from caffeinated beverages remain well within safe levels for consumption by young children.
PubMed ID
16759437 View in PubMed
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Caffeine and risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter: the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17161
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Mar;81(3):578-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Lars Frost
Peter Vestergaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aarhus Sygehus, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. Lars.Frost@as.aaa.dk
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Mar;81(3):578-82
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Atrial Fibrillation - epidemiology - etiology
Atrial Flutter - epidemiology - etiology
Cacao - chemistry
Caffeine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Carbonated Beverages - analysis
Coffee - chemistry
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet Surveys
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Tea - chemistry
Abstract
BACKGROUND: It is not known whether the consumption of caffeine is associated with excess risk of atrial fibrillation. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter in association with daily consumption of caffeine from coffee, tea, cola, cocoa, and chocolate. DESIGN: We prospectively examined the association between the amount of caffeine consumed per day and the risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter among 47 949 participants (x age: 56 y) in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study. Subjects were followed in the Danish National Registry of Patients and in the Danish Civil Registration System. The consumption of caffeine was analyzed by quintiles with Cox proportional-hazard models. RESULTS: During follow-up (x: 5.7 y), atrial fibrillation or flutter developed in 555 subjects (373 men and 182 women). When the lowest quintile of caffeine consumption was used as a reference, the adjusted hazard ratios (95% CIs) in quintiles 2, 3, 4, and 5 were 1.12 (0.87, 1.44), 0.85 (0.65, 1.12), 0.92 (0.71, 1.20), and 0.91 (0.70, 1.19), respectively. CONCLUSION: Consumption of caffeine was not associated with risk of atrial fibrillation or flutter.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Mar;81(3):539-4015755819
PubMed ID
15755825 View in PubMed
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[Effect of plant biocomposites based on Georgian tea "per se" and in combination with cisplatin on Walker carcinosarcoma W-256 and Guerin's carcinoma growth rate in rats]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78109
Source
Lik Sprava. 2006 Dec;(8):89-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Zalietok S P
Orlovs'kyi O A
Hohol' S V
Samoilenko O A
Hulua L.
Kvesitadze H I
Source
Lik Sprava. 2006 Dec;(8):89-93
Date
Dec-2006
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic - administration & dosage - isolation & purification - therapeutic use
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Carcinoma 256, Walker - drug therapy
Cell Line, Tumor
Cisplatin - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor
Female
Flavonoids - administration & dosage - isolation & purification - therapeutic use
Neoplasm Transplantation
Neoplasms, Experimental - drug therapy
Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent - drug therapy
Phenols - administration & dosage - isolation & purification - therapeutic use
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Tea - chemistry
Abstract
Green tea biocomposite had effectivey hampered the growth of rat Walker W-256 carcinoma and in less extent rat Guerin's carcinoma. Black tea biocomposite had not practically influenced on Guerin's carcinoma growth. The biocomposite from green tea and extract from red vine rind and lemon suppressed at the level of tendency the growth of rat Walker W-256 carcinoma. The biocomposite from green tea and extract from red vine rind had hampered only Guerin's carcinoma growth and at the tendency had increased the growth of W-256 carcinosarcoma growth. This biocomposite increased also considerably the therapeutic efficiency of cisplatin on Guerin's carcinoma. Studed vegetable biocomposites posesses antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties.
PubMed ID
17427433 View in PubMed
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Preparation and application of tea to a tritium performance testing programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136652
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2012 Jan;148(2):242-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Joseph N Daka
Gerry Moodie
Anthony Dinardo
Gary H Kramer
Author Affiliation
National Calibration and Reference Centre, Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, 775 Brookfield Road, PL# 6302D, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 1C1. joseph.n.daka@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2012 Jan;148(2):242-8
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Assay - standards
Canada
Carbon Radioisotopes - urine
Humans
National Health Programs
Radiation Monitoring - standards
Tea - chemistry
Tritium - urine
Abstract
A simple, but novel technique, for adjusting steeps of black tea to produce fluids, which are visually and spectroscopically similar to urine, has been developed at the National Calibration Reference Centre for Bioassay and In Vivo Monitoring in Canada. The method uses scans of absorbance versus wavelength, in the UV-VIS range (200-800 nm) to select diluted tea steeps that simulate urine. Tea solutions (1 and 10 %) were spiked with tritium and distributed to laboratories for performance testing (PT). The PT exercise was done as in a regular bioassay programme. The results showed that all samples satisfied the pass/fail conditions of the S-106 standard of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, suggesting that adjusted tea successfully simulated urine for the tritium PT programmes. Also, since unlike urine whose use may increase the probability of contaminating and transmitting diseases (e.g. hepatitis C), tea is a safer alternative. When needed, it can readily be prepared for the laboratories.
PubMed ID
21357582 View in PubMed
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The role of imiquimod 3.75% cream in the treatment of external genital warts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125334
Source
Skin Therapy Lett. 2012 Apr;17(4):5-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Brian Berman
Joel Wolf
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA.
Source
Skin Therapy Lett. 2012 Apr;17(4):5-7
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Topical
Aminoquinolines - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Canada
Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic
Condylomata Acuminata - drug therapy
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Approval
Humans
Interferon Inducers - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Plant Extracts - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Tea - chemistry
United States
United States Food and Drug Administration
Abstract
Imiquimod 3.75% cream has recently been approved by both the U.S. Federal Drug Administration and Health Canada for the treatment of external genital warts. Herein, we provide an overview of external genital warts, review the phase 3 clinical trials leading to the approval of imiquimod 3.75% cream, and compare its efficacy and clinical use with imiquimod 5% cream. Moreover, therapeutic options have further expanded with the relatively recent introduction of sinecatechins 15% ointment, an extract of green tea leaves.
PubMed ID
22491804 View in PubMed
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Urine flavonoids and plasma carotenoids in the validation of fruit, vegetable and tea intake during pregnancy in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163632
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Aug;10(8):838-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Anne Lise Brantsaeter
Margaretha Haugen
Salka E Rasmussen
Jan Alexander
Sven Ove Samuelsen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo, Norway. anne.lise.brantsaeter@fhi.no
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Aug;10(8):838-47
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - blood - urine
Carotenoids - blood
Cohort Studies
Diet
Female
Flavonoids - urine
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Questionnaires - standards
Tea - chemistry
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
To validate a new food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for measuring the intake of fruit, vegetables and tea reported by women participating in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).
Intake of fruits, vegetables and tea estimated by the FFQ was compared with urinary flavonoid excretion, plasma carotenoid concentration and intake measured by a 4-day weighed food diary (FD). The triangular method was applied to calculate FFQ validity coefficients using two independent biomarkers.
One hundred and nineteen women participating in MoBa.
The FFQ estimate of fruit intake was significantly correlated with urine phloretin (r = 0.33), citrus fruit/juice with urine hesperetin (r = 0.44), cooked vegetables with plasma alpha-carotene (r = 0.37), and tea with urine kaempferol (r = 0.41) (P
PubMed ID
17493318 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.