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Ability to taste phenylthiocarbamide among Alaskan Eskimos and other populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135
Source
Human Biology. 31(4):352-359.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1959
  1 document  
Author
Allison, A.C.
Blumberg, B.S.
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Medical Research (London)
Source
Human Biology. 31(4):352-359.
Date
1959
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
365419
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Barrow
Phenylthiocarbamide tasting
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1318.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 150.
Documents

AbilityToTastePhenylthiocarbamideAmongAlaskan.pdf

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The ability to taste PTC among Swedish men and women (nulliparae and others).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66946
Source
Acta Genet Med Gemellol (Roma). 1965 Oct;14(4):417-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1965
Author
T. Romanus
Source
Acta Genet Med Gemellol (Roma). 1965 Oct;14(4):417-20
Date
Oct-1965
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Male
Parity
Phenylthiourea
Pregnancy
Sweden
Taste
PubMed ID
5882608 View in PubMed
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Altered food intake and taste perception in children with cancer after start of chemotherapy: perspectives of children, parents and nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82385
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2006 Apr;14(4):369-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Skolin Inger
Wahlin Ylva Britt
Broman Daniel A
Koivisto Hursti Ulla-Kaisa
Vikström Larsson Marita
Hernell Olle
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. inger.skolin@labmed.ki.se
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2006 Apr;14(4):369-78
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude
Child
Child, Preschool
Eating
Female
Humans
Infant
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - drug therapy
Pediatrics
Sweden
Taste - drug effects
Abstract
GOALS OF WORK: The purpose of this study was to better understand various variables related to food intake and eating problems in children with cancer during their chemotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-two consecutively admitted children, diagnosed with cancer and undergoing chemotherapy, participated in this study. Twenty-one of them, their parents and attending nurses participated in semi-structured interviews. Ten of the children underwent a taste acuity test, and recognition thresholds for the four basic tastes were determined. MAIN RESULTS: The shared view of both children and parents was that altered taste was the predominant cause of the eating problems. In contrast, the nurses perceived that nausea was the most important cause of the children's eating problems. In addition, psychological aspects such as learned food aversions and negative attitudes towards hospital food were regarded as important by children, parents and nurses. The taste test showed that the patients had higher thresholds for bitter taste and made more taste recognition errors compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS: Changes seem to exist both in the primary gustatory sense as well as in food perception in paediatric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Single solutions, such as efforts to serve "tasty food", do not suffice alone. A more effective solution may be to combine different strategies and combinations of oral, enteral and parenteral nutrition should be considered to prevent malnutrition.
PubMed ID
16633841 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of the nutrition of elderly people in Ukraine]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61588
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2003;72(5):3-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Iu G Grigorov
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2003;72(5):3-7
Date
2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Appetite
Cholesterol - blood
Diet
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Electrocardiography
English Abstract
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Sex Factors
Taste - physiology
Tooth - physiology
Ukraine
Abstract
A comparative analysis of the factual nutrition and health indices for 1970-2001 was made involving 2950 persons aged 60-89 years, residents of Ukraine. The state of nutrition of 530 single non-working citizens of NIS states, being taken care of by a social care service, was studied. The assortment structure of food products is sharply reduced, the contents of main nutrients and biologically active substances are unbalanced. The is conditioned by poor socio-economic of the people of this age category, on the one hand and by age-related changes of the digestive system, taste sensitivity, etc., on the other. It has been shown that more than 15% of older has a protein-energetic malnutrition.
PubMed ID
14619607 View in PubMed
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An Eclectic review of the physical anthropology of the Eskimo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1192
Source
Pages 18-29 in V.F. Valentine and F.G. Vallee, eds. Eskimo of the Canadian Arctic. McClelland and Stewart Ltd., Toronto. Carleton Library 41.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1968
Author
Hughes, D.R.
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto
Source
Pages 18-29 in V.F. Valentine and F.G. Vallee, eds. Eskimo of the Canadian Arctic. McClelland and Stewart Ltd., Toronto. Carleton Library 41.
Date
1968
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Anatomical variation
Serological surveys
Blood groups, ABO
Blood groups, MN
Haptoglobin
Phenylthiocarbamide tasting
Dermatoglyphics
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1254.
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[An ecogenetic approach to studying the adaptation and human health]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51234
Source
Genetika. 1992 Apr;28(4):176-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1992
Author
A G Novoradovskii
R K Agapova
V A Spitsyn
A D Ispolatov
V A Shenin
Source
Genetika. 1992 Apr;28(4):176-85
Date
Apr-1992
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Blood Group Antigens - genetics
Blood Proteins - genetics
Color Perception - genetics
English Abstract
Erythrocytes - enzymology
Genetic markers
Health status
Heterozygote
Humans
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk
Siberia
Taste - genetics
Abstract
Genetic markers--blood groups ABO, RH, MN; serum proteins HP, PI, TF, C3; erythrocyte enzymes ACP1, ESD, AK1, PGM1, GLO1, PGD, PGP; and the other: PTC-tasting, ear wax types and color vision, were studied in two aboriginal Buryatian populations of Baikal Lake region: in Chitinskaya and Irkutskaya Provinces. Two samples were further divided into subgroups, according to their health status: "healthy", "indefinite" and "sick" by means of special regression procedure. The "healthy" subgroup of the Chitinskaya Province population is characterized by higher frequencies of PTC-tasters: 0.871 vs. 0.757 in the "sick" part (chi 2 = 5.36, p less than 0.05); higher frequency of the phenotype PI M1M1: 0.734 in "healthy" vs. 0.547 in "sick" (chi 2 = 8.89, p less than 0.01); also, lower frequency of the PI M1M2 phenotype: 0.148 and 0.299, respectively (chi 2 = 7.49, p less than 0.01); the frequencies of the phenotype TF C2C2 are: 0.015 and 0.076 (chi 2 = 5.48, p less than 0.05). In Irkutskaya Province population differences between "healthy" and "sick" subgroups were discovered for blood group AB: "healthy" 0.046 and "sick"--0.175 (chi 2 = 11.28, p less than 0.010); for GC (1F-2)--0.214 and 0.116 (chi 2 = 4.45, p less than 0.05). Some other differences between "healthy" and "sick" in both populations are not significant. Some trends concerning heterozygosity in loci--GC, PGM, TF were discovered. The results are considered from the viewpoint of higher fitness of some genetic traits in the populations studied.
PubMed ID
1639251 View in PubMed
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Aquatic taste and odor: a primary signal of drinking-water integrity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178332
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2004 Oct 22-Nov 26;67(20-22):1779-95
Publication Type
Article
Author
Susan Watson
Author Affiliation
National Water Research Institute, Environment Canada, Ecology Division, Department of Biosciences, University of Calgary, Burlington, Ontario, Canada. swatson@ucalgary.ca
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2004 Oct 22-Nov 26;67(20-22):1779-95
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Eukaryota - metabolism
Fresh Water
Humans
Odors
Organic Chemicals - metabolism
Seasons
Taste
Water Pollutants, Chemical - metabolism
Water Pollution - prevention & control
Water supply
Abstract
Aquatic taste and odor (T/O) is rarely produced by toxic contaminants or pathogens; nevertheless, it has major negative impacts on the public and the drinking-water industry. Consumers use T/O as a primary measure of drinking water safety, yet this criterion is poorly understood, and its origins and triggers often go untraced. Much surface-water T/O is produced by the increased production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by algae. These chemicals can be symptomatic of short-term problems with source, treatment, or distribution systems. At a broader level, they can signify fundamental changes in aquatic ecosystems induced by human activity. T/O varies in chemistry, intensity, and production patterns among different algal taxa, and is often linked with excessive algal growth and/or the invasion of noxious species. Some VOCs may signal the presence of potentially toxic algae and/or other associated water quality issues. Traditionally, T/O has been linked with the widespread eutrophication of many surface waters; however, there has been a recent growth in the number of T/O events reported in oligo-mesotrophic systems, for example, the Glenmore Reservoir (Calgary AB) and the Laurentian Great Lakes. From a management and public perspective, therefore, it is vitally important to monitor T/O, and to continue to work toward a better understanding of the proximal and the ultimate causes-which VOCs and algae species are involved. In the short term, odor events could be anticipated and water treatment optimized. In the long term, this approach would contribute toward more a robust management of this resource through remedial or preventative measures.
PubMed ID
15371216 View in PubMed
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Association between parental motives for food choice and eating patterns of 12- to 13-year-old Norwegian children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120156
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 Nov;16(11):2023-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Inger M Oellingrath
Margrethe Hersleth
Martin V Svendsen
Author Affiliation
1 Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Department of Health Studies, Telemark University College, PO Box 201, 3914 Porsgrunn, Norway.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 Nov;16(11):2023-31
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Body Weight
Child
Child Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Energy intake
Family
Fast Foods
Female
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Health Behavior
Health Food
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Meals
Motivation
Norway
Parents
Principal Component Analysis
Questionnaires
Taste
Abstract
To determine (i) the importance of parents’ motives for everyday family food choices; and (ii) the relationship between parental food choice motives and eating patterns of 12- to 13-year-old children.
Cross-sectional study. A modified version of the Food Choice Questionnaire was used to determine parental motives for food choices. The children’s food and drink intake was reported by their parents using a retrospective FFQ. Eating patterns were derived using principal component analysis. The association between food choice motives and eating patterns was examined using multiple linear regression analysis.
Primary schools, Telemark County, Norway.
In total, 1095 children aged 12–13 years and their parents.
The parental motive ‘sensory appeal’ was the most important for food choice, followed by ‘health’, ‘convenience’, ‘natural content’ and ‘weight control’. The food choice motives were associated with the eating patterns of the children, independent of background variables. The motive ‘health’ was most strongly associated with a ‘varied Norwegian’ eating pattern, representing a diverse diet and regular meals, while the motive ‘convenience’ appeared to be the most important barrier to this eating pattern. ‘Weight control’ was not associated with the ‘varied Norwegian’ eating pattern.
To encourage parents to make healthy food choices for their children, health promotion activities should focus on the health benefits of a diverse diet and regular meals, rather than weight control. Recommended food products should be made more convenient and easily available for families with children.
PubMed ID
23034288 View in PubMed
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Blinded taste panel evaluations to determine if fish from near the oil sands are preferred less than fish from other locations in Alberta, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137800
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Feb 15;45(4):1730-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2011
Author
Brenda Barona
Rozlyn F Young
Phillip M Fedorak
Wendy V Wismer
Author Affiliation
Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2P5.
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Feb 15;45(4):1730-6
Date
Feb-15-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta
Animals
Canada
Consumer Satisfaction
Female
Fishes
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Oil and Gas Fields
Rivers
Seafood - classification
Taste
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
The oil sands industry is rapidly expanding surface mining and bitumen extraction operations near the Athabasca River in northeastern Alberta, Canada. There are anecdotal comments that the fish from the Athabasca River have an off-taste, implying that the oil sands operations are the cause. This study was done to determine if the taste of wild fishes caught near the Athabasca oil sands was less preferred than the taste of fishes collected from two other river basins in Alberta. In blinded experiments, consumer sensory panels, of 40 to 44 participants, tasted steamed samples of each of three fish species (walleye (Sander vitreus), northern pike (Esox lucius), and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis)) from three different sources in Alberta (the Athabasca River, Buck Lake, and McGregor Lake). Data analyses showed that there was no evidence from the consumer preference rankings that the taste of the fish from the Athabasca River was preferred less than the taste of fish from two other water bodies in Alberta.
PubMed ID
21247102 View in PubMed
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Body fat, sweetness sensitivity, and preference: determining the relationship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126364
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2012;73(1):45-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Laurel Ettinger
Lisa Duizer
Tristaca Caldwell
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2012;73(1):45-8
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Dietary Sucrose - metabolism
Female
Food Preferences
Humans
Middle Aged
Nova Scotia
Ontario
Overweight - etiology - metabolism - pathology
Skinfold thickness
Taste Threshold
Young Adult
Abstract
The study was conducted to evaluate whether body fat is a better measure than body mass index (BMI) for determining the relationship between body size and sweetness perception and preference.
Seventy-two women were recruited and separated into two groups. First, BMI was determined and used to classify each woman as either normal weight (18.5 to 24.9 kg/m²) or overweight (>25.0 kg/m²). Body fat was determined from skinfold sites and used to categorize women into normal (
PubMed ID
22397966 View in PubMed
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140 records – page 1 of 14.