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561 records – page 1 of 57.

Activities of counsellors in a hospice/palliative care environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191781
Source
J Palliat Care. 2001;17(4):229-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
M. Thompson
C. Rose
W. Wainwright
L. Mattar
M. Scanlan
Author Affiliation
Victoria Hospice Society, Royal Jubilee Hospital, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2001;17(4):229-35
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
Hospices
Humans
Male
Palliative Care - methods
Professional-Family Relations
Psychotherapy - methods
Social Support
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
This study examined activities related to the provision of psychosocial care by counsellors in the hospice/palliative care setting. A qualitative design using written reports was used in an urban Canadian hospice/palliative care program. A convenient sample of 13 counsellors indicated the activities they typically performed in their work with patients and families. Thematic analysis of the activities directly related to patient and family care was performed and then validated by presenting these activities back to the counsellors in a group setting. Seven themes resulted: 1) companioning; 2) psychosocial assessment, planning, and evaluation; 3) counselling interventions; 4) facilitation and advocacy; 5) patient and family education; 6) consultation and reporting; and 7) team support. These thematic findings confirmed those of previous studies and also highlighted two additional findings. Team support was seen as an activity that directly affected client care, and there was a strong emphasis on the activity of companioning the dying and their families. Also discussed are implications of these results, as well as suggestions for further research.
PubMed ID
11813339 View in PubMed
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Activity profile of top-class association football referees in relation to performance in selected physical tests.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163966
Source
J Sports Sci. 2007 May;25(7):805-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Javier Mallo
Enrique Navarro
José-María García-Aranda
Bart Gilis
Werner Helsen
Author Affiliation
Facultad de Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte--INEF--Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
Source
J Sports Sci. 2007 May;25(7):805-13
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Fatigue
Finland
Humans
Locomotion - physiology
Male
Physical Exertion - physiology
Physical Fitness
Soccer
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
The aims of the present study were (1) to analyse the physical demands of top-class referees and (2) to compare their official FIFA fitness test results with physical performance during a match. The work rate profiles of 11 international referees were assessed during 12 competitive matches at the 2003 FIFA Under-17 World Cup and then analysed using a bi-dimensional photogrammetric video analysis system based on direct lineal transformation (DLT) algorithms. In the first 15 min of matches, the referees were more active, performing more high-intensity exercise (P
PubMed ID
17454548 View in PubMed
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Activity theory as a framework for analyzing and redesigning work.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197626
Source
Ergonomics. 2000 Jul;43(7):960-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
Y. Engeström
Author Affiliation
Academy of Finland, Center for Activity Theory and Developmental Work Research, University of Helsinki. yrjo.engestrom@helsinki.fi
Source
Ergonomics. 2000 Jul;43(7):960-74
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Critical Pathways
Finland
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Man-Machine Systems
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Task Performance and Analysis
User-Computer Interface
Work
Abstract
Cultural-historical activity theory is a new framework aimed at transcending the dichotomies of micro- and macro-, mental and material, observation and intervention in analysis and redesign of work. The approach distinguishes between short-lived goal-directed actions and durable, object-oriented activity systems. A historically evolving collective activity system, seen in its network relations to other activity systems, is taken as the prime unit of analysis against which scripted strings of goal-directed actions and automatic operations are interpreted. Activity systems are driven by communal motives that are often difficult to articulate for individual participants. Activity systems are in constant movement and internally contradictory. Their systemic contradictions, manifested in disturbances and mundane innovations, offer possibilities for expansive developmental transformations. Such transformations proceed through stepwise cycles of expansive learning which begin with actions of questioning the existing standard practice, then proceed to actions of analyzing its contradictions and modelling a vision for its zone of proximal development, then to actions of examining and implementing the new model in practice. New forms of work organization increasingly require negotiated 'knotworking' across boundaries. Correspondingly, expansive learning increasingly involves horizontal widening of collective expertise by means of debating, negotiating and hybridizing different perspectives and conceptualizations. Findings from a longitudinal intervention study of children's medical care illuminate the theoretical arguments.
PubMed ID
10929830 View in PubMed
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The acute care nurse practitioner in Ontario: a workforce study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154071
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2008;21(4):100-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Christina Hurlock-Chorostecki
Mary van Soeren
Sharon Goodwin
Author Affiliation
Parkwood Hospital of St. Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario, Canada. tina.hurlock-chorostecki@sjhc.london.on.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2008;21(4):100-16
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease - nursing
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Nurse Practitioners - statistics & numerical data
Nurse's Role
Nursing Staff, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Professional Autonomy
Professional Practice Location
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
In spite of the long history of nurse practitioner practice in primary healthcare, less is known about nurse practitioners in hospital-based environments because until very recently, they have not been included in the extended class registration (nurse practitioner equivalent) with the College of Nurses of Ontario. Recent changes in the regulation of nurse practitioners in Ontario to include adult, paediatric and anaesthesia, indicates that a workforce review of practice profiles is needed to fully understand the depth and breadth of the role within hospital settings. Here, we present information obtained through a descriptive, self-reported survey of all nurse practitioners working in acute care settings who are not currently regulated in the extended class in Ontario. Results suggest wide acceptance of the role is concentrated around academic teaching hospitals. Continued barriers exist related to legislation and regulation as well as understanding and support for the multiple aspects of this role beyond clinical practice. This information may be used by nurse practitioners, nursing leaders and other administrators to position the role in hospital settings for greater impact on patient care. As well, understanding the need for regulatory and legislative changes to support the hospital-based Nurse Practitioner role will enable greater impact on health human resources and healthcare transformation.
PubMed ID
19029848 View in PubMed
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The acute effect of acupuncture on 20-km cycling performance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159410
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2008 Jan;18(1):76-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Satpal Dhillon
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. satpal@ualberta.ca
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2008 Jan;18(1):76-80
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta
Bicycling
Cross-Over Studies
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Single-Blind Method
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
To examine acupuncture's effect on cycling performance.
This was a prospective, single-blind, patient as own control (repeated measures), crossover design. Subjects underwent 3 tests a week, riding a stationary bike for 20-km as fast as able. Before each test, they received acupuncture (test A), "sham" acupuncture (test B), and no intervention (control, test C) once each in a random order.
University of Alberta, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine.
20 male cyclists (age, 18 to 30 years) were recruited via convenience sampling of students and general public. Athletic ability was assessed through a questionnaire and modified Par-Q.
Acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and no intervention in random order with each subject before each test. Acupuncture points were chosen on the basis of Traditional Chinese Medicine and administered immediately before cycling. Sham was shallow needling of known acupoints.
The outcome measures of each of the tests were time to completion, VAS for lower extremity/exercise-induced pain, Borg rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and blood lactate concentrations, recorded immediately following each test.
Mean times to Test A, B, and C completion were 36.19 +/- 5.23, 37.03 +/- 5.66, and 37.48 +/- 6.00 minutes, respectively, P = 0.76. Mean RPE scores after tests A, B, and C were 17.65 +/- 0.67, 16.95 +/- 0.99, and 16.85 +/- 0.88, respectively, P = 0.0088. Mean VAS scores after tests A, B, and C were 7.72 +/- 0.86, 7.94 +/- 0.78, and 8.08 +/- 0.69, respectively, P = 0.76.
The only statistically significant finding was that acupuncture gave higher RPE scores compared to the other tests. The clinical significance was that the higher RPE scores gave lower time and VAS scores.
PubMed ID
18185043 View in PubMed
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The adaptation of an adult group screening test for dyslexia into Finland-Swedish: normative data for university students and the effects of language background on test performance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84750
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2007 Oct;48(5):419-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Lindgrén Signe-Anita
Laine Matti
Author Affiliation
Abo Akademi University, Turku, Finland. signe-anita.lindgren@abo.fi
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2007 Oct;48(5):419-32
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Awareness
Cultural Characteristics
Dyslexia - diagnosis
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Language
Male
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Memory
Multilingualism
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Phonetics
ROC Curve
Self Disclosure
Students - psychology
Sweden
Task Performance and Analysis
Vocabulary
Abstract
We present a Finland-Swedish adaptation of the Sweden-Swedish group screening test for dyslexia for adults and young adults DUVAN (Lundberg & Wolff, 2003) together with normative data from 143 Finland-Swedish university students. The test is based on the widely held phonological deficit hypothesis of dyslexia and consists of a self-report and five subtests tapping phonological working memory, phonological representation, phonological awareness, and orthographic skill. We describe the test adaptation procedure and show that the internal reliability of the new test version is comparable to the original one. Our results indicate that the language background (Swedish, Finnish, early simultaneous Swedish-Finnish bilingualism) should be taken into account when interpreting the results on the Finland-Swedish DUVAN test. We show that the FS-DUVAN differentiates a group of students with dyslexia diagnosis from normals, and that a low performance on the FS-DUVAN correlates with a positive self-report on familial dyslexia and with a history of special education in school. Finally, we analyze the sensitivity and specificity of the FS-DUVAN for dyslexia among university students.
PubMed ID
17877557 View in PubMed
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[A four-year survey of transfers from Aarhus Hospital with accompanying anaesthesiology staff]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29998
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 Nov 15;166(47):4261-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2004

[Age and professional characteristics of loss of work time by middle medical personnel]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42465
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1976;(8):39-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Author
E N Matveev
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1976;(8):39-45
Date
1976
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Nurses
Russia
Siberia
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
Wast of working time and distraction from basic duties over a period of one year in different age and professional groups of the paramedical personnel were studied in 2 regions and 1 territory of the RSFSR. The investigation showed that on all occasions and on account of all causes the waste of productive time and distraction from primary duties occurred among the personnel of young age. In senior age groups this figures were noted to be on decline. Essential age-specific features common to the frequency and duration of lost working time and distraction from basic duties were found to be associated with temporary incapacitation, leaves of absence due to pregnancy and confinement, care of children, etc. The existence of a definite connection of the factors under study and posts occupied by paramedical workers was established.
PubMed ID
135352 View in PubMed
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Age-related differences in reaction time task performance in young children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158163
Source
J Exp Child Psychol. 2009 Feb;102(2):150-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Sergey Kiselev
Kimberly Andrews Espy
Tiffany Sheffield
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Psychology, Ural State University, Yekaterinburg 620083, Russian Federation. eskisa@rambler.ru
Source
J Exp Child Psychol. 2009 Feb;102(2):150-66
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Choice Behavior - physiology
Cognition - physiology
Discrimination (Psychology) - physiology
Discrimination Learning - physiology
Female
Humans
Judgment - physiology
Male
Pattern Recognition, Visual - physiology
Photic Stimulation - methods
Play and Playthings
Reaction Time - physiology
Russia
Students - psychology
Task Performance and Analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
Performance of reaction time (RT) tasks was investigated in young children and adults to test the hypothesis that age-related differences in processing speed supersede a "global" mechanism and are a function of specific differences in task demands and processing requirements. The sample consisted of 54 4-year-olds, 53 5-year-olds, 59 6-year-olds, and 35 adults from Russia. Using the regression approach pioneered by Brinley and the transformation method proposed by Madden and colleagues and Ridderinkhoff and van der Molen, age-related differences in processing speed differed among RT tasks with varying demands. In particular, RTs differed between children and adults on tasks that required response suppression, discrimination of color or spatial orientation, reversal of contingencies of previously learned stimulus-response rules, and greater stimulus-response complexity. Relative costs of these RT task differences were larger than predicted by the global difference hypothesis except for response suppression. Among young children, age-related differences larger than predicted by the global difference hypothesis were evident when tasks required color or spatial orientation discrimination and stimulus-response rule complexity, but not for response suppression or reversal of stimulus-response contingencies. Process-specific, age-related differences in processing speed that support heterochronicity of brain development during childhood were revealed.
PubMed ID
18359494 View in PubMed
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561 records – page 1 of 57.