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Adjustments to the Annotated zoogeography of non-marine Tardigrada. Part III: North America and Greenland by Kaczmarek, Michalczyk McInnes (Zootaxa 4203).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297997
Source
Zootaxa. 2019 Jan 04; 4543(1):99-114
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-04-2019
Author
William R Miller
Emma S Perry
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology and Chemistry, Baker University, Baldwin City, KS 66006, U.S.A.. William.Miller@BakerU.edu.
Source
Zootaxa. 2019 Jan 04; 4543(1):99-114
Date
Jan-04-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Ecosystem
Greenland
North America
Tardigrada
Abstract
The art of biogeography starts with two basic questions: WHERE has each species been found and WHICH species have been found there. While using the Annotated zoogeography of non-marine Tardigrada. Part III: North America and Greenland (Kaczmarek, et al. 2016) we found that 26 non-standard state and province abbreviations had been used in the WHERE table and that there was no WHICH table. We present an adjusted WHERE table and add a WHICH table as a supplement to the original paper.
PubMed ID
30647315 View in PubMed
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Annotated zoogeography of non-marine Tardigrada. Part III: North America and Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282253
Source
Zootaxa. 2016 Dec 01;4203(1):zootaxa.4203.1.1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-01-2016
Author
Lukasz Kaczmarek
Lukasz Michalczyk
Sandra J McInnes
Source
Zootaxa. 2016 Dec 01;4203(1):zootaxa.4203.1.1
Date
Dec-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animals
Canada
Ecosystem
Greenland
Tardigrada - physiology
United States
Abstract
This paper is the third monograph of the series that describes the global records of limno-terrestrial water bears (Tardigrada). Here, we provide a comprehensive list of non-marine tardigrades recorded from the North America, providing an updated and revised taxonomy accompanied by geographic co-ordinates, habitat, and biogeographic comments. It is hoped this work will serve as a reference point and background for further zoogeographical and taxonomical studies.
PubMed ID
27988614 View in PubMed
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Eremobiotus ginevrae sp. nov. and Paramacrobiotus pius sp. nov., two new species of Eutardigrada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280419
Source
Zootaxa. 2016 Apr 14;4103(4):344-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-14-2016
Author
Oscar Lisi
Maria Grazia Binda
Giovanni Pilato
Source
Zootaxa. 2016 Apr 14;4103(4):344-60
Date
Apr-14-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animal Structures - anatomy & histology - growth & development
Animals
Body Size
Ecosystem
Female
Israel
Male
Organ Size
Russia
Sicily
Tardigrada - anatomy & histology - classification - growth & development
Abstract
Two new eutardigrade species are described: Eremobiotus ginevrae sp. nov. and Paramacrobiotus pius sp. nov. The first is similar to Eremobiotus alicatai (Binda, 1969) but differs in the claw shape and dimensions. It has been found in Sicily, Israel and Russia. The second species, belonging to the richtersi group, is currently found exclusively in Sicily. It has a smooth cuticle, three macroplacoids and a microplacoid, eggs with reticulated trunco-conical processes with small terminal thorns; the egg-shell is areolated and the areolae are clearly sculptured.
PubMed ID
27394740 View in PubMed
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Macrobiotus coronifer Richters, 1903 (type species for Richtersius Pilato amp; Binda, 1989): designating a new neotype from the original type locality described within the integrative taxonomy framework.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304551
Source
Zootaxa. 2020 Sep 30; 4858(2):zootaxa.4858.2.10
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-30-2020
Author
Daniel Stec
Lukasz Michalczyk
Author Affiliation
Institute of Zoology and Biomedical Research, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 9, 30-387 Kraków, Poland. daniel_stec@interia.eu.
Source
Zootaxa. 2020 Sep 30; 4858(2):zootaxa.4858.2.10
Date
Sep-30-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Tardigrada
Abstract
The designation of a neotype for Macrobiotus coronifer Richters, 1903 (now the type species of the genus Richtersius Pilato Binda, 1989) by Maucci Ramazzotti (1981) with type locality Bodø in Norway is shown to be invalid as it does not comply with the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (Article 75.3.4). Furthermore, the specimen selected by Maucci Ramazzotti (1981) is not from the original type locality, and the superficial and outdated documentation prevent a reliable identification of the species. A Code-compliant neotype is therefore designated. The new neotype was collected from the original locus typicus in Svalbard and described with standard light microscopy, detailed scanning electron microscopy imaging, DNA barcodes and a transcriptome, which makes it ideally suited for stabilising the taxonomy and nomenclature of Richtersius coronifer (Richters, 1903).
PubMed ID
33056237 View in PubMed
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Revision of Testechiniscus Kristensen, 1987 (Heterotardigrada: Echiniscidae) refutes the polar-temperate distribution of the genus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296821
Source
Zootaxa. 2018 Sep 10; 4472(2):261-297
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-10-2018
Author
Piotr GAsiorek
Daniel Stec
Krzysztof Zawierucha
Reinhardt Møbjerg Kristensen
Lukasz Michalczyk
Author Affiliation
Institute of Zoology and Biomedical Research, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 9, 30-387 Kraków, Poland. user@example.com.
Source
Zootaxa. 2018 Sep 10; 4472(2):261-297
Date
Sep-10-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Antarctic Regions
Arctic Regions
Ethiopia
Svalbard
Tardigrada
Abstract
The family Echiniscidae comprises limno-terrestrial heterotardigrades with a strongly sclerotised dorsum, typically covered with plates. Among other members of the Echiniscus evolutionary line, the genus Testechiniscus Kristensen, 1987 stands out with well-developed ventral armature and polygonal sculpturing of the dorsal plates. It has alleged bipolar distribution (with satellite alpine records in the Holarctic). Thanks to fresh material from terra typica (Svalbard), we integratively redescribe (i.e. using light and electron microscopy imaging, morphometry, and molecular methods) the nominal species for the genus, Testechiniscus spitsbergensis (Scourfield, 1897). A comparison of the neotype series with a number of Holarctic records revealed morphological variability suggesting that the species may encompass several taxa, which, most likely, will be possible to delineate primarily with molecular tools. Moreover, based on material from Simien Mountains (Northern Ethiopia), we describe a new sibling subspecies, Testechiniscus spitsbergensis tropicalis ssp. nov. Extensive morphometric datasets are provided for the genus members for the first time. A new generic definition is proposed, embracing the two subspecies of T. spitsbergensis and T. laterculus (Schuster et al., 1980), but excluding two circum-Antarctic species, T. macronyx (Richters, 1907) and T. meridionalis (Murray, 1906). The later species are likely to be erected in the future as separate genera, and their autapomorphies are described here. In the light of our findings, the genus          Testechiniscus should be recognised as a native element of the Northern Hemisphere, with mainly circum-Arctic distribution and additional, insular alpine records from the Nearctic, Palearctic and Eastern Afrotropic.
PubMed ID
30313368 View in PubMed
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Tardigrades of Finland: new records and an annotated checklist.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304558
Source
Zootaxa. 2020 Sep 11; 4851(3):zootaxa.4851.3.3
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-11-2020
Author
Tommi Vuori
Edoardo Massa
Sara Calhim
Matteo Vecchi
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological and Environmental Science, University of Jyvaskyla, PO Box 35, FI-40014, Finland. user@example.com.
Source
Zootaxa. 2020 Sep 11; 4851(3):zootaxa.4851.3.3
Date
Sep-11-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Ecosystem
Finland
Tardigrada
Abstract
Species checklists are powerful and important tools of communication between taxonomists and applied environmental biologists, which in turn lead to well-planned and successful conservation strategies and ecological studies. Despite this, only recently the interest on compiling systematic checklists is growing among taxonomists who study tardigrades-micrometazoans that inhabit almost every habitat worldwide. As the Finnish records of tardigrades (a.k.a. water bears) species are incomplete, outdated and no checklist has ever been compiled for this country, an easy-to-consult checklist is here reported. This checklist covers all Finnish tardigrade taxa identified in the past and in the 13 samples collected for this study. A total of 68 tardigrade species are recorded from Finland, with 6 of them being new records presented in this contribution. Of these species, four have their loci tipici in Finland and we provide an English translation of their original German descriptions. A Generalised Linear Model was used to test the effect of sampling effort and area size on the number of species recorded in each biogeographical province of Finland. The results showed that geographical differences in species richness can be explained solely by sampling effort. The number of tardigrade species recorded in Finland corresponds to about 5% of all described species in the phylum, thus indicating a potential high richness for this country. However, the results of the Generalised Linear Model highlight that a reliable knowledge of the tardigrade diversity in Finland will be reached only with a more uniform and intensive sampling effort.
PubMed ID
33056718 View in PubMed
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Tardigrades of Sweden; an updated check-list.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280111
Source
Zootaxa. 2015 Jul 07;3981(4):491-507
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-07-2015
Author
Roberto Guidetti
K Ingemar Jönsson
Reinhardt Møbjerg Kristensen
Source
Zootaxa. 2015 Jul 07;3981(4):491-507
Date
Jul-07-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animal Structures - anatomy & histology - growth & development
Animals
Body Size
Checklist
Ecosystem
Female
Male
Organ Size
Sweden
Tardigrada - anatomy & histology - classification - growth & development
Abstract
Tardigrades occur worldwide and in a variety of ecosystems and habitats representing an important component of the micrometazoan biodiversity. Several studies documenting the occurrence of tardigrades in Sweden have been published since the first reports in early 1900, but no comprehensive summary of these studies have been published. We compiled the available information on recorded tardigrades from Sweden, using material from published studies and museum and university collections. In total, our review document 101 species of tardigrades that have been recorded from Sweden (an updated checklist of tardigrades from Sweden will be available online), of which 14 species are new records for the country. The highest number of species was recorded in the northernmost province of Lappland and the more southern provinces of Uppland and Skåne, while much lower species numbers are reported from the middle part of Sweden. This pattern probably represents biased sampling activities of biologists rather than real differences in biodiversity of tardigrades. In view of the few studies that have been made on tardigrade biodiversity in Sweden, the relatively high number of tardigrade species recorded, representing almost a tenth of the species recorded worldwide, indicates that many more species remain to be found. In this respect, more studies of the marine ecosystems along the Swedish west coast and the long Baltic Sea coastline would be of particular interest.
PubMed ID
26250009 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.