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450K epigenome-wide scan identifies differential DNA methylation in newborns related to maternal smoking during pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122072
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Oct;120(10):1425-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Bonnie R Joubert
Siri E Håberg
Roy M Nilsen
Xuting Wang
Stein E Vollset
Susan K Murphy
Zhiqing Huang
Cathrine Hoyo
Øivind Midttun
Lea A Cupul-Uicab
Per M Ueland
Michael C Wu
Wenche Nystad
Douglas A Bell
Shyamal D Peddada
Stephanie J London
Author Affiliation
Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709, USA.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Oct;120(10):1425-31
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors - genetics - metabolism
Biological Markers - blood
Chromatography, Liquid
Cohort Studies
Cotinine - blood
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 - genetics - metabolism
DNA Methylation
DNA-Binding Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Epigenesis, Genetic
Female
Fetal Blood
Genome-Wide Association Study
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Exposure
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - epidemiology - genetics
Repressor Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Transcription Factors - genetics - metabolism
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation, due to in utero exposures may play a critical role in early programming for childhood and adult illness. Maternal smoking is a major risk factor for multiple adverse health outcomes in children, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear.
We investigated epigenome-wide methylation in cord blood of newborns in relation to maternal smoking during pregnancy.
We examined maternal plasma cotinine (an objective biomarker of smoking) measured during pregnancy in relation to DNA methylation at 473,844 CpG sites (CpGs) in 1,062 newborn cord blood samples from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip (450K).
We found differential DNA methylation at epigenome-wide statistical significance (p-value
Notes
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Comment In: Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Oct;120(10):a40223026408
Erratum In: Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Dec;120(12):A455
PubMed ID
22851337 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-associated tyrosine nitration of rat skeletal muscle glycogen phosphorylase b: characterization by HPLC-nanoelectrospray-tandem mass spectrometry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82459
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2006 Apr;41(4):407-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Sharov Victor S
Galeva Nadezhda A
Kanski Jaroslaw
Williams Todd D
Schöneich Christian
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Kansas, 2095 Constant Avenue, Lawrence, KS 66047, USA.
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2006 Apr;41(4):407-16
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - metabolism
Animals
Base Sequence
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Glycogen Phosphorylase, Muscle Form - analysis - genetics - metabolism
Longevity
Molecular Sequence Data
Muscle, Skeletal - metabolism
Peroxynitrous Acid
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Sequence Alignment
Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Tyrosine - analogs & derivatives - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
We identified age-dependent post-translational modifications of skeletal muscle glycogen phosphorylase b (Ph-b), isolated from F1 hybrids of Fisher 344 x Brown Norway rats. Ph-b isolated from 34 months old rats showed a statistically significant decrease in specific activity compared to 6 months old animals: 13.8+/-0.7 vs. 20.6+/-0.8 U mg(-1) protein, respectively. Western blot analysis of the purified Ph-b with anti-3-NT antibodies revealed an age-dependent accumulation of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), quantified by reverse-phase HPLC-UV analysis to increase from 0.05+/-0.03 to 0.34+/-0.11 (mol 3-NT/mol Ph-b) for 6 vs. 34 months old rats, respectively. HPLC-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry revealed the accumulation of 3-NT on Tyr113, Tyr161 and Tyr573. While nitration of Tyr113 was detected for both young and old rats, 3-NT at positions 161 and 573 was identified only for Ph-b isolated from 34 months old rats. The sequence of the rat muscle Ph-b was corrected based on our protein sequence mapping and a custom rat PHS2 sequence containing 17 differently located amino acid residues was used instead of the database sequence. The in vitro reaction of peroxynitrite with Ph-b resulted in the nitration of multiple Tyr residues at positions 51, 52, 113, 155, 185, 203, 262, 280, 404, 473, 731, and 732. Thus, the in vitro nitration conditions only mimic the nitration of a single Tyr residue observed in vivo suggesting alternative pathways controlling the accumulation of 3-NT in vivo. Our data show a correlation of age-dependent 3-NT accumulation with Ph-b inactivation.
PubMed ID
16616821 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alternaria toxins alternariol and alternariol monomethyl ether in grain foods in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119610
Source
Mycotoxin Res. 2012 Nov;28(4):261-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Peter M Scott
Wendy Zhao
Sherry Feng
Benjamin P-Y Lau
Author Affiliation
Health Canada, Food Research Division, 251 Sir Frederick Banting Driveway, Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9 Canada. Peter_Scott@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Mycotoxin Res. 2012 Nov;28(4):261-6
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alternaria - chemistry
Canada
Cereals - chemistry
Chromatography, Liquid
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Lactones - analysis
Limit of Detection
Methanol
Solid Phase Extraction
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Abstract
Alternaria alternata has been reported to be the most common fungus on Canadian Western wheat. The Alternaria toxins alternariol (AOH) and alternariol monomethyl ether (AME) are mutagenic in vitro and there is also limited evidence for carcinogenic properties. They have been found in wheat from Europe, Argentina, China and Australia, but they have not been looked for in Canadian grains or grain foods. In the present study, 83 samples of grain-based food sold in Canada, including flour, bran, breakfast cereals, infant cereals and bread, were analysed for AOH and AME using extraction with methanol, clean-up on combined aminopropyl/C18 solid phase extraction (SPE) columns, and liquid chromatography (LC) with tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) determination. The overall average recoveries of AOH and AME from a variety of spiked cereal foods (n?=?13) were 45?±?9% and 53?±?9%, which could be attributed mainly to MS matrix effects The instrumental limits of detection (LOD) were 0.34 ng/g and 0.13 ng/g for AOH and AME, respectively, and the instrumental limits of quantitation (LOQ) were 1.1 and 0.43 ng/g. Of 83 samples analysed, 70 were positive for AOH (up to 63 ng/g, in a soft wheat bran) and 64 contained AME (up to 12 ng/g in a bran-based breakfast cereal). Of particular interest was the presence of AOH and/or AME in 27 out of 30 infant foods (up to 4.4 ng/g and 9.0 ng/g, respectively, in a sample of multigrain cereal).
Notes
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PubMed ID
23087499 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anabolic androgenic steroids in police cases in Sweden 1999-2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127729
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2012 Jun 10;219(1-3):199-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-10-2012
Author
Yvonne Lood
Arne Eklund
Mats Garle
Johan Ahlner
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden. yvonne.lood@rmv.se
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2012 Jun 10;219(1-3):199-204
Date
Jun-10-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anabolic Agents - urine
Chromatography, Liquid
Female
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Narcotics - urine
Police
Prisoners
Substance Abuse Detection
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Young Adult
Abstract
Anabolic Androgenic Steroids (AAS) are considered drugs of abuse and are controlled substances in Sweden since 1999. Traditionally AAS have been used by elite athletes to enhance performance, but in recent years it has become an increasing problem outside elite sport among athletes, bodybuilders and criminals. Use of AAS is associated with psychiatric side effects such as aggression, depression and violent behavior. Supraphysiological doses and long term use can cause serious physical harm such as cardiovascular toxicity and even premature death. We investigated and evaluated the drug analytical findings in forensic cases from suspected perpetrators in cases from the police where a screening for AAS was requested to get information about the prevalence of AAS use and the occurrence of poly-drug abuse. The study was based on samples submitted from the police authorities to the Department of Forensic Toxicology in Sweden during the period 1999-2009. Urines were analyzed by methods based on GC-MS and LC-MS-MS. We also analyzed the prevalence of AAS use at the prison and probation services. A total number of 12,141 urine samples (6362 police cases and 5779 inmates) were analyzed and 33.5% of the cases from the police and 11.5% of the inmates were tested positive for AAS. The users of AAS were mainly in 99.2% men with a mean age of 26.2±6.2 years whereas the women were 29.5±6.5 years old. The most frequently used AAS was nandrolone followed by testosterone and methandienone. Other illicit and licit drugs were detected in 60% of the cases from the police, strongly indicating a frequent poly-drug abuse among users of AAS.
PubMed ID
22269132 View in PubMed
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Analysis of clothing and urine from Moscow theatre siege casualties reveals carfentanil and remifentanil use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120444
Source
J Anal Toxicol. 2012 Nov-Dec;36(9):647-56
Publication Type
Article
Author
James R Riches
Robert W Read
Robin M Black
Nicholas J Cooper
Christopher M Timperley
Author Affiliation
Detection Department, Defence Science and Technology Laboratory-Dstl, Porton Down, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP4 0JQ, UK.
Source
J Anal Toxicol. 2012 Nov-Dec;36(9):647-56
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerosols - adverse effects
Chromatography, Liquid
Clothing
Female
Fentanyl - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - blood - urine
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow
Piperidines - adverse effects - blood - urine
Riot Control Agents, Chemical - adverse effects - blood - urine
Solid Phase Extraction
Specimen Handling
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Terrorism - prevention & control
Abstract
On October 26, 2002, Russian Special Forces deployed a chemical aerosol against Chechen terrorists to rescue hostages in the Dubrovka theatre. Its use confirmed Russian military interest in chemicals with effects on personnel and caused 125 deaths through a combination of the aerosol and inadequate medical care. This study provides evidence from liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of extracts of clothing from two British survivors, and urine from a third survivor, that the aerosol comprised a mixture of two anaesthetics--carfentanil and remifentanil--whose relative proportions this study was unable to identify. Carfentanil and remifentanil were found on a shirt sample and a metabolite called norcarfentanil was found in a urine sample. This metabolite probably originated from carfentanil.
PubMed ID
23002178 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anatoxin-a and its metabolites in blue-green algae food supplements from Canada and Portugal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164436
Source
J Food Prot. 2007 Mar;70(3):776-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Dorothea F K Rawn
Barbara Niedzwiadek
Benjamin P Y Lau
Martin Saker
Author Affiliation
Food Research Division, Food Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, 2203D, 251 Sir Frederick Banting Driveway, Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0K9. thea_rawn@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
J Food Prot. 2007 Mar;70(3):776-9
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid - methods
Chromatography, Liquid
Consumer Product Safety
Cyanobacteria - metabolism
Dietary Supplements - analysis - microbiology - standards
Fluorescence
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Portugal
Sensitivity and specificity
Spirulina - metabolism
Tandem Mass Spectrometry - methods
Tropanes - analysis
Abstract
Blue-green algae and spirulina are marketed in health food stores and over the Internet as food supplements in Canada, the United States, and Europe. The reported benefits of consuming these products include improved digestion, strengthening of the immune system, and relief from the symptoms of attention deficit disorder. Some of these products have been found to contain elevated concentrations of microcystins, which are known hepatotoxins. In addition to producing microcystins, Anabaena sp. and Aphanizomenon sp. also produce the potent neurotoxin anatoxin-a. Samples of food supplements containing blue-green algae and spirulina were collected in Portugal and from urban centers across Canada in 2005. Extracts of these supplements were analyzed to determine the presence and concentrations of anatoxin-a and its two main metabolites, dihydroanatoxin-a and epoxyanatoxin-a. Initial analyses were performed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection, and confirmation required the use of LC with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). The HPLC with fluorescence detection indicated no anatoxin-a, but four samples were suspected to contain either dihydroanatoxin-a or epoxyanatoxin-a at 0.1 to 0.2 microg/g. LC-MS-MS results, however, indicated no trace of either transformation product in any sample analyzed. The detection limits for anatoxin-a, dihydroanatoxin-a, and epoxyanatoxin-a were similar for both fluorescence detection (0.2 to 0.3, 0.4 to 1.4, and 0.2 to 1.5 pg on the column, respectively) and mass spectrometry (0.3 to 1.5, 0.3 to 0.8, and 0.5 to 0.8 pg on the column, respectively). Because of the higher specificity of the LC-MS-MS analysis, all tested food supplement samples were considered free of anatoxin-a and its transformation products.
PubMed ID
17388076 View in PubMed
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An online SPE LC-MS/MS method for the analysis of antibiotics in environmental water.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283186
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Mar;24(9):8692-8699
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Meierjohann Axel
Kortesmäki Ewelina
Brozinski Jenny-Maria
Kronberg Leif
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Mar;24(9):8692-8699
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - analysis
Chromatography, Liquid - methods
Finland
Online Systems
Rivers - chemistry
Solid Phase Extraction - methods
Tandem Mass Spectrometry - methods
Waste Water - analysis - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Purification
Abstract
A fast and simple method for the analysis of 17 commonly used antibiotics in Finland in water samples was developed. The method combines online solid phase extraction using a reusable online trapping column combined with analytical separation on a C18 analytical column and detection by a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method was fully validated for detection and quantification limits as well as linearity, repeatability, and matrix effects. The method gave an excellent linear response (r (2) > 0.99) and detection limits for all compounds (1-10 ng(-1)), except for tetracycline (20 ng l(-1)) and roxithromycin (50 ng l(-1)). The repeatability was evaluated at two concentrations, and the values at 5 ng l(-1) ranged from 5 to 39% and at 100 ng l(-1) ranged from 3 to 19%. To test the method on real samples at low environmental concentrations, water samples collected from a river receiving discharges from two wastewater treatment plants were analyzed as well as samples from a pristine river. Seven antibiotics as well as carbamazepine were detected in the samples. The concentration of the compounds ranged from 5 to 81 ng l(-1).
PubMed ID
28210946 View in PubMed
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ApoA-I/HDL-C levels are inversely associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm progression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270673
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2015 Jun;113(6):1335-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Elena Burillo
Jes S Lindholt
Pedro Molina-Sánchez
Immaculada Jorge
Roxana Martinez-Pinna
Luis Miguel Blanco-Colio
Carlos Tarin
Monica Maria Torres-Fonseca
Margarita Esteban
Jesper Laustsen
Priscilla Ramos-Mozo
Enrique Calvo
Juan Antonio Lopez
Melina Vega de Ceniga
Jean-Baptiste Michel
Jesus Egido
Vicente Andrés
Jesús Vazquéz
Olivier Meilhac
Jose Luis Martin-Ventura
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2015 Jun;113(6):1335-46
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angiotensin II
Animals
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - blood - chemically induced - diagnosis - drug therapy - genetics
Apolipoprotein A-I - blood - pharmacology
Apolipoproteins E - deficiency - genetics
Biomarkers - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Chromatography, Liquid
Denmark
Disease Models, Animal
Disease Progression
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Mice, Knockout
Molecular Mimicry
Multivariate Analysis
Nanotechnology
Peptides - pharmacology
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Proteomics - methods
Registries
Spain
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Abstract
Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) evolution is unpredictable, and there is no therapy except surgery for patients with an aortic size>?5 cm (large AAA). We aimed to identify new potential biomarkers that could facilitate prognosis and treatment of patients with AAA. A differential quantitative proteomic analysis of plasma proteins was performed in AAA patients at different stages of evolution [small AAA (aortic size=3-5 cm) vs large AAA] using iTRAQ labelling, high-throughput nano-LC-MS/MS and a novel multi-layered statistical model. Among the proteins identified, ApoA-I was decreased in patients with large AAA compared to those with small AAA. These results were validated by ELISA on plasma samples from small (n=90) and large AAA (n=26) patients (150± 3 vs 133± 5 mg/dl, respectively, p
PubMed ID
25789510 View in PubMed
Less detail

Application of isotope dilution mass spectrometry: determination of ochratoxin A in the Canadian Total Diet Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134090
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 Jun;28(6):754-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
J. Tam
P. Pantazopoulos
P M Scott
J. Moisey
R W Dabeka
I D K Richard
Author Affiliation
Health Canada-Santé Canada, Ontario Region, Food Laboratories Division, 2301 Midland Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 Jun;28(6):754-61
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bread - analysis
Calibration
Canada
Carbon Isotopes
Cereals - chemistry
Chromatography, Affinity
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Diet
Fast Foods - analysis
Food Analysis - methods
Food Contamination
Food Habits
Humans
Indicator Dilution Techniques
Limit of Detection
Nutrition Surveys
Ochratoxins - analysis - chemistry - isolation & purification
Reproducibility of Results
Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Abstract
Analytical methods are generally developed and optimized for specific commodities. Total Diet Studies, representing typical food products 'as consumed', pose an analytical challenge since every food product is different. In order to address this technical challenge, a selective and sensitive analytical method was developed suitable for the quantitation of ochratoxin A (OTA) in Canadian Total Diet Study composites. The method uses an acidified solvent extraction, an immunoaffinity column (IAC) for clean-up, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for identification and quantification, and a uniformly stable isotope-labelled OTA (U-[(13)C(20)]-OTA) as an internal recovery standard. Results are corrected for this standard. The method is accurate (101% average recovery) and precise (5.5% relative standard deviation (RSD)) based on 17 duplicate analysis of various food products over 2 years. A total of 140 diet composites were analysed for OTA as part of the Canadian Total Diet Study. Samples were collected at retail level from two Canadian cities, Quebec City and Calgary, in 2008 and 2009, respectively. The results indicate that 73% (102/140) of the samples had detectable levels of OTA, with some of the highest levels of OTA contamination found in the Canadian bread supply.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21623499 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between perfluoroalkyl substances and thyroid stimulating hormone among pregnant women: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107424
Source
Environ Health. 2013;12(1):76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Yan Wang
Anne P Starling
Line S Haug
Merete Eggesbo
Georg Becher
Cathrine Thomsen
Gregory Travlos
Debra King
Jane A Hoppin
Walter J Rogan
Matthew P Longnecker
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Durham, NC, USA. wangy13@niehs.nih.gov.
Source
Environ Health. 2013;12(1):76
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alkanes - blood
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Fluorocarbons - blood
Humans
Immunoassay
Linear Models
Norway
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Thyrotropin - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are a group of highly persistent chemicals that are widespread contaminants in wildlife and humans. Exposure to PFAS affects thyroid homeostasis in experimental animals and possibly in humans. The objective of this study was to examine the association between plasma concentrations of PFASs and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) among pregnant women.
A total of 903 pregnant women who enrolled in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study from 2003 to 2004 were studied. Concentrations of thirteen PFASs and TSH were measured in plasma samples collected around the 18th week of gestation. Linear regression models were used to evaluate associations between PFASs and TSH.
Among the thirteen PFASs, seven were detected in more than 60% of samples and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) had the highest concentrations (median, 12.8 ng/mL; inter-quartile range [IQR], 10.1 -16.5 ng/mL). The median TSH concentration was 3.5 (IQR, 2.4 - 4.8) µIU/mL. Pregnant women with higher PFOS had higher TSH levels. After adjustment, with each 1 ng/mL increase in PFOS concentration, there was a 0.8% (95% confidence interval: 0.1%, 1.6%) rise in TSH. The odds ratio of having an abnormally high TSH, however, was not increased, and other PFASs were unrelated to TSH.
Our results suggest an association between PFOS and TSH in pregnant women that is small and may be of no clinical significance.
Notes
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PubMed ID
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