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Catheter ablation for ventricular tachycardia in ischaemic heart disease; acute success and long-term outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256843
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2014 Feb;48(1):27-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Thibault Johan Mørk
Jens Kristensen
Jens Christian Gerdes
Henrik Kjærulf Jensen
Peter Lukac
Jens Cosedis Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital , Skejby , Denmark.
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2014 Feb;48(1):27-34
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Catheter Ablation - adverse effects
Defibrillators, Implantable
Denmark
Electric Countershock - instrumentation
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - complications - diagnosis
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Tachycardia, Ventricular - diagnosis - etiology - surgery
Tertiary Care Centers
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We conducted a study to assess the acute procedural success and the long-term effect of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for ventricular tachycardia (VT) in patients with ischaemic heart disease.
We included 90 patients with ischaemic heart disease treated with RFA for VT in our institution. Data were obtained from patient files, and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) discharges were recorded from in-house and remote follow-up data. Recurrence of VT during follow-up was noted as date of first ICD therapy for VT or first recurrence of symptomatic VT.
After the initial RFA procedure no VT was inducible in 42 patients (47%), non-clinical VT was inducible in 21 patients (23%), and the clinical VT was still inducible in 14 patients (16%). The procedural success was indefinable in 13 patients (14%). After a median follow-up of 33 months after the latest RFA, 38 patients (42%) stayed free from recurrent VT. The number of ICD shocks/year was significantly reduced from median 1.1 (interquartile range: 0.3-2.8) to 0 (0-0.4) (p
PubMed ID
24460505 View in PubMed
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[Heart rate turbulence and T-wave alternans as markers of risk of sudden cardiac death in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106893
Source
Kardiologiia. 2013;53(9):40-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
D A Tsaregorodtsev
I R Bukiia
V A Sulimov
I V Leont'eva
V A Makarova
Author Affiliation
I.M. Sechenov First Moscow Medical State University, ul. Trubetskaya 8 str. 2, 119992 Moscow, Russia.
Source
Kardiologiia. 2013;53(9):40-6
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Defibrillators, Implantable
Echocardiography
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory - methods
Female
Heart Conduction System - physiopathology
Heart rate
Humans
Middle Aged
Moscow - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prognosis
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Tachycardia, Ventricular - diagnosis - etiology - mortality - physiopathology - prevention & control
Abstract
to study microvolt T-wave alternans (mTWA) and heart rate turbulence (HRT) in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCMP).
We examined 50 patients with HCMP: 15 (28%) with obstructive form, 23 (46%) with major risk factors of sudden cardiac death (SCD), 7 (14%) with left ventricular thickness more or equal 3 cm, 6 (12%) with family history of SCD, 16 (32%) with attacks of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (NVT), 5 (10%) with episodes of syncope. Control group comparable by age and gender composition comprised 50 persons without cardiovascular diseases. All patients were subjected to 24-hour ECG monitoring with registration of parameters of variability and HRT (turbulence onset [TO], turbulence slope), maximal mTWA values, mTWA at heart rate 100 bpm, mTWA at 05.00 AM (mTWA05:00).
Patients with HCMP compared to controls were characterized by significantly higher values of mTWA05:00 (19 [13;30] and 9 [4;15] mcV, respectively, p
PubMed ID
24090385 View in PubMed
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[Ventricular tachyarrhythmias. A retrospective analysis of etiology, demography and treatment]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86114
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Jun 16;170(25):2234-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-16-2008
Author
Christensen Alex Hørby
Henningsen Kristoffer
Svendsen Jesper Hastrup
Author Affiliation
Kardiologisk Afdeling B, Rigshospitalet, Hjertecentret, DK-2100 København Ø. alexhc@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Jun 16;170(25):2234-7
Date
Jun-16-2008
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiomyopathies - complications
Defibrillators, Implantable
Electrocardiography
Female
Heart Arrest - complications
Heart Diseases - complications
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - complications
Retrospective Studies
Tachycardia, Ventricular - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to investigate the age, sex, etiology, frequency of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) and previous cardiac arrest among patients discharged from the Department of Cardiology, Rigshospitalet (Copenhagen University Hospital), Denmark, due to ventricular tachyarrhythmias. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective review of 993 patients discharged from Rigshospitalet over 6 years and 5 months with the diagnostic codes ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation or premature ventricular contractions. RESULTS: The population had an average age of 59 years (ranging 15-95 years) with a majority of males (76%). Among the patients with known etiology ischemic heart disease (60%), dilated cardiomyopathy (6%) and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (6%) were the most frequent. A substantial number of the patients (15%) had unknown etiology; 492 (50%) of the patients overall had an ICD implanted, the majority of whom had been categorized as having ventricular tachycardia (92%); 168 patients had previous cardiac arrest, 127 of whom did not have a potential reversible cause. Of this group 75 (59%) had an ICD implanted. CONCLUSION: Ischemic heart disease is the most common cause of ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Approximately half the patients admitted with ventricular tachyarrhythmias had an ICD implanted, the majority of whom did not have previous cardiac arrest.
PubMed ID
18565312 View in PubMed
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