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Addressing the health needs of frail elderly people: Ontario's experience with an integrated health information system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168728
Source
Age Ageing. 2006 Jul;35(4):329-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
John P Hirdes
Source
Age Ageing. 2006 Jul;35(4):329-31
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Public Health Informatics
Systems Integration
Notes
Comment On: Age Ageing. 2006 Jul;35(4):434-816540491
PubMed ID
16788076 View in PubMed
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Advancement of the artificial pancreas through the development of interoperability standards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108263
Source
J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2013 Jul;7(4):1066-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Peter E Picton
Melanie Yeung
Nathaniel Hamming
Lane Desborough
Eyal Dassau
Joseph A Cafazzo
Author Affiliation
Centre for Global eHealth Innovation, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. peter.picton@uhn.ca
Source
J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2013 Jul;7(4):1066-70
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Networks
Computer Communication Networks - standards
Congresses as topic
Diabetes Mellitus - surgery
Endocrine Surgical Procedures - standards
Equipment Design - standards
Humans
Pancreas, Artificial - standards
Research
Systems Integration
Abstract
Despite advancements in the development of the artificial pancreas, barriers in the form of proprietary data and communication protocols of diabetes devices have made the integration of these components challenging. The Artificial Pancreas Standards and Technical Platform Project is an initiative funded by the JDRF Canadian Clinical Trial Network with the goal of developing device communication standards for the interoperability of diabetes devices. Stakeholders from academia, industry, regulatory agencies, and medical and patient communities have been engaged in advancing this effort. In this article, we describe this initiative along with the process involved in working with the standards organizations and stakeholders that are key to ensuring effective standards are developed and adopted. Discussion from a special session of the 12th Annual Diabetes Technology Meeting is also provided.
Notes
Cites: Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2007;2007:6175-718003430
Cites: Hypertension. 2012 Jul;60(1):51-722615116
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2012;14(1):e3122356799
Cites: JAMA. 2005 Jul 27;294(4):490-216046656
Cites: IEEE Trans Inf Technol Biomed. 2008 Jul;12(4):470-918632327
Cites: Radiology. 2005 Aug;236(2):382-516040896
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2012;14(3):e7022564332
PubMed ID
23911190 View in PubMed
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The Alberta Cardiac Access Collaborative: improving the cardiac patient journey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146165
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:85-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Robyn Blackadar
Mishaela Houle
Author Affiliation
Alberta Cardiac Access Collaborative.
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:85-90
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Benchmarking - organization & administration
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Coronary Artery Bypass
Evidence-Based Practice
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Plan Implementation
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Heart Diseases - therapy
Humans
National health programs - organization & administration
Organizational Case Studies
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Systems Integration
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Waiting Lists
Abstract
The Alberta Cardiac Access Collaborative (ACAC) is a joint initiative of Alberta's health system to improve access to adult cardiac services across the patient journey. ACAC has created new care delivery models and implemented best practices across Alberta in four streams across the continuum: heart attack, patient navigation, heart failure and arrhythmia. Emergency medical providers, nurses, primary care physicians, hospitals, cardiac specialists and clinicians are all working together to integrate services, bridge jurisdictions and geography with one aim--improving the patient journey for adults in need of cardiac care.
PubMed ID
20057256 View in PubMed
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Alberta's systems approach to chronic disease management and prevention utilizing the expanded chronic care model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146163
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:98-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Sandra Delon
Blair Mackinnon
Author Affiliation
Chronic Disease Prevention & Oral Health, Alberta Health Services.
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:98-104
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Chronic Disease - prevention & control
Consumer Participation
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Decision Support Techniques
Disease Management
Evidence-Based Practice
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Humans
Long-Term Care
Models, organizational
National Health Programs
Organizational Case Studies
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Participation
Patient-Centered Care
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Self Care
Systems Integration
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Abstract
Alberta's integrated approach to chronic disease management programming embraces client-centred care, supports self-management and facilitates care across the continuum. This paper presents strategies implemented through collaboration with primary care to improve care of individuals with chronic conditions, evaluation evidence supporting success and lessons learned from the Alberta perspective.
PubMed ID
20057258 View in PubMed
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All components of the system must be aligned.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184914
Source
Healthc Pap. 2001;2(1):38-43, discussion 86-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
J E Turnball
Author Affiliation
National Patient Safety Foundation,Chicago, Illinois, USA.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2001;2(1):38-43, discussion 86-9
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Participation
Continuity of Patient Care
Decision Making, Organizational
Humans
Medical Errors - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
National health programs - organization & administration
Organizational Culture
Organizational Innovation
Patient Participation
Safety Management - organization & administration
Systems Integration
Abstract
A culture of safety in healthcare will not be achieved until the fragmentation that currently characterizes the delivery system is replaced by an alignment of the many component parts, including providers, patients and their families and front-line workers on the "sharp end'--physicians, nurses and pharmacists. A systemic approach should be introduced that would recognize the interacting nature of the delivery system's component parts, and that a change in one component of the system will provoke a change in another part. Consumers and their families can be empowered through programs that raise awareness, prevent error and mitigate its effect when error does happen. Within the system, the "safety sciences' can provide guides to effective work processes. Finally, it is critical to capture knowledge of what type of error occurs in what place and to elucidate strategies to prevent the error.
Notes
Comment On: Healthc Pap. 2001;2(1):10-3112811154
PubMed ID
12811156 View in PubMed
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[A new tool for retrieving clinical data from various sources].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170496
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Feb 23;126(5):605-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-23-2006
Author
Erik Waage Nielsen
Anders Hovland
Oddgeir Strømsnes
Author Affiliation
Anestesi- og intensivavdelingen, Nordlandssykehuset, 8092 Bodø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Feb 23;126(5):605-7
Date
Feb-23-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiology Service, Hospital - standards
Database Management Systems
Hospital Information Systems
Humans
Medical Record Linkage
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Norway
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Software
Systems Integration
Abstract
A doctor's tool for extracting clinical data from various sources on groups of hospital patients into one file has been in demand. For this purpose we evaluated Qlikview.
Based on clinical information required by two cardiologists, an IT specialist with thorough knowledge of the hospital's data system (www.dips.no) used 30 days to assemble one Qlikview file. Data was also assembled from a pre-hospital ambulance system.
The 13 Mb Qlikview file held various information on 12430 patients admitted to the cardiac unit 26,287 times over the last 21 years. Included were also 530,912 clinical laboratory analyses from these patients during the past five years. Some information required by the cardiologists was inaccessible due to lack of coding or data storage. Some databases could not export their data. Others were encrypted by the software company. A major part of the required data could be extracted to Qlikview. Searches went fast in spite of the huge amount of data. Qlikview could assemble clinical information to doctors from different data systems. Doctors from different hospitals could share and further refine empty Qlikview files for their own use. When the file is assembled, doctors can, on their own, search for answers to constantly changing clinical questions, also at odd hours.
PubMed ID
16505871 View in PubMed
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An overview of the British Columbia Glomerulonephritis network and registry: integrating knowledge generation and translation within a single framework.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106448
Source
BMC Nephrol. 2013;14:236
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Sean Barbour
Monica Beaulieu
Jagbir Gill
Ognjenka Djurdjev
Heather Reich
Adeera Levin
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Sean.Barbour@vch.ca.
Source
BMC Nephrol. 2013;14:236
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Community Networks - statistics & numerical data
Glomerulonephritis - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Prevalence
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Systems Integration
Translational Medical Research - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Glomerulonephritis (GN) is a group of rare kidney diseases with a substantial health burden and high risk of progression to end-stage renal disease. Research in GN has been limited by poor availability of large comprehensive registries. Substantial variations in access to and administration of treatment and outcomes in GN have been described. Leveraging provincial resources and existing infrastructure, the British Columbia (BC) GN Network is an initiative which serves to combine research and clinical care objectives. The goal of the BC GN Network is to coordinate and improve health care, including robust data capture, on all patients with GN in BC, a Canadian province of over 4.6 million people. This provincial initiative will serve as a model for Canadian or other national and international endeavours.
The BC Provincial Renal Agency (BCPRA) is the provincial governmental agency responsible for health delivery for all kidney patients in BC. The BC GN Network has been created by the BCPRA to ensure high quality and equitable access to care for all patients with GN and is a platform for evidence based clinical care programs and associated health policy. All patients with biopsy-proven GN are registered at the time of kidney biopsy into the BCPRA provincial database of kidney disease patients, forming the BC GN Registry. Thereafter, all laboratory results and renal related outcomes are captured automatically. Histology data and core clinical variables are entered into the database. Additional linkages between the GN Registry and administrative databases ensure robust capture of medications, hospital admissions, health care utilization, comorbidities, cancer and cardiac outcomes, and vital statistics.
The BC GN Network and Registry is a unique model in that it combines robust data capture, data linkages, and health care delivery and evaluation into one integrated system. This model utilizes existing health infrastructure to prospectively capture population level data on patients with GN, producing a rich dataset capable of real-time identification and evaluation of GN health policy initiatives, of supporting observational cohort studies and health services research in GN, and of facilitating patient recruitment into GN clinical trials.
Notes
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 2000 Mar;35(3):448-5710692270
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2002 Sep;17(9):1594-60212198210
Cites: Kidney Int. 2004 Sep;66(3):898-90415327378
Cites: Kidney Int. 2004 Sep;66(3):920-315327382
Cites: Kidney Int. 2004 Sep;66(3):1199-20515327418
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Jan 15;124(2):158-617006783
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1993 Jul 8;329(2):85-98510707
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 1998 Jul;32(1):72-99669427
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2005 Jan;20(1):147-5415585514
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2005 Apr;16(4):1061-815716334
Cites: BMC Nephrol. 2005;6:1416329758
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2007 Dec;18(12):3177-8317978307
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2008 Jan;19(1):164-918003780
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 2008 Nov;52(5):939-4618617302
Cites: Kidney Int. 2009 Sep;76(5):534-4519571791
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2010 Feb;25(2):334-619948876
Cites: Kidney Int. 2010 Aug;78(4):337-4220520593
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2011 Feb;26(2):414-3021068142
Cites: JAMA. 2011 Oct 19;306(15):1679-8722009100
Cites: Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2012 Sep;7(9):1401-822798538
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2012 Oct;27 Suppl 3:iii104-1021719715
PubMed ID
24168011 View in PubMed
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[Approaches to development and implementation of the medical information system for military-medical commission of the multidisciplinary military-medical organisation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267148
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2015 Jun;336(6):8-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
K E Kuvshinov
V M Klipak
A L Chaplyuk
V M Moskovko
D V Belyshev
O A Zherebko
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2015 Jun;336(6):8-14
Date
Jun-2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Electronic Health Records
Humans
Information Systems - organization & administration
Military Medicine - organization & administration
Military Personnel
Physical Examination - methods
Russia
Systems Integration
Abstract
The current task of the implementation of medical information systems in the military and medical organizations is an automation of the military-medical expertise as one of the most important activities. In this regard, noteworthy experience of the 9th Medical Diagnostic Centre (9th MDC), where on the basis of medical information system "Interi PROMIS" for the first time was implemented the automation of the work of military medical commission. The given paper presents an algorithm for constructing of the information system for the military-medical examination; detailed description of its elements is given. According to military servicemen the implementation of the Military Medical Commission (MMC) subsystem of the medical information system implemented into the 9th MDC has reduced the time required for the MMC and paperwork, greatly facilitate the work of physicians and medical specialists on military servicemen examination. This software can be widely applied in ambulatory and hospital practice, especially in case of mass military-medical examinations.
PubMed ID
26442309 View in PubMed
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Benefits negotiation: three Swedish hospitals pursuit of potential electronic health record benefits.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272395
Source
Int J Electron Healthc. 2013;7(3):248-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
John S Jeansson
Source
Int J Electron Healthc. 2013;7(3):248-68
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Electronic Health Records
Humans
Information Systems
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Negotiating
Sweden
Systems Integration
Abstract
At the very heart of Swedish healthcare digitalisation are large investments in electronic health records (EHRs). These integrated information systems (ISs) carry promises of great benefits and value for organisations. However, realising IS benefits and value has, in general, proven to be a challenging task, and as organisations strive to formalise their realisation efforts a misconception of rationality threatens to emerge. This misconception manifests itself when the formality of analysis threatens to underrate the impact of social processes in deciding which potential benefits to pursue. This paper suggests that these decisions are the result of a social process of negotiation. The purpose of this paper is to observe three benefits analysis projects of three Swedish hospitals to better understand the character and management of proposed benefits negotiations. Findings depict several different categories of benefits negotiations, as well as key factors to consider during the benefits negotiation process.
PubMed ID
24191344 View in PubMed
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Beyond knowledge transfer: a model of knowledge integration in a clinical setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170441
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2005;18(4):33-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Nicole Gauthier
Kathy Ellis
Nancy Bol
Paul Stolee
Author Affiliation
Organizational Development and Learning Services, St Joseph's Health Care London.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2005;18(4):33-7
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Biomedical research
Diffusion of Innovation
Evidence-Based Medicine
Geriatric Assessment
Geriatric Psychiatry
Health Services Research
Humans
Information Dissemination
Interdisciplinary Communication
Knowledge
Leadership
Models, organizational
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Pain Clinics - organization & administration
Pain Measurement
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - organization & administration
Systems Integration
Abstract
Current conceptualizations of knowledge transfer reinforce the notion of a linear process between researchers and clinicians, who are seen as operating separately with different agenda. This paper uses a case study to illustrate a dynamic model of knowledge integration involving integrated and interdependent relationships among researchers, clinicians, and decision-makers. We believe the principles of this model are more likely to lead to effective use of research evidence in clinical practice.
PubMed ID
16509279 View in PubMed
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116 records – page 1 of 12.