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[About effectiveness and perspective of application of test of venereal disease research laboratory (VDRL) for diagnostic of neurosyphilis in the Russian Federation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112678
Source
Klin Lab Diagn. 2013 Mar;(3):30-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
G Iu Kuliash
M I Sabaev
L V Erko
S G Mardanly
N V Bakhilina
Source
Klin Lab Diagn. 2013 Mar;(3):30-3
Date
Mar-2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Bacterial - diagnostic use - immunology
Cardiolipins - diagnostic use - immunology
Clinical Laboratory Techniques
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neurosyphilis - cerebrospinal fluid - diagnosis - epidemiology
Russia
Syphilis Serodiagnosis - methods
Treponema pallidum - immunology - isolation & purification
Young Adult
Abstract
The comparative evaluation of effectiveness of different nontreponema tests in analysis of cerebrospinal fluid. The liquor from 100 patients with syphilis was analyzed using Bordet-Gengou test, VDRL test and micro-precipitation reaction with cardiolipin antigen. The Bordet-Gengou test and VDRL test made in Russia or abroad are equally effective in analysis of positive samples of liquor and twice surpass the same capacity of micro-precipitation reaction with cardiolipin antigen in case of neurosyphilis with symptoms and thrice surpass in case of asymptomatic neurosyphilis. VDRL test is a simple standardized nontreponema reaction which can substitute labor-consuming non-unified liquorologic complex in laboratory diagnostic of neurosyphilis. The testing of liquor on the basis of micro-precipitation reaction with cardiolipin antigen is non-effective and results in false negative results in Bordet-Gengou and VDRL positive tests determining high risk of erroneous clinical considerations.
PubMed ID
23808023 View in PubMed
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Analytical evaluation of nine serological assays for diagnosis of syphilis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277224
Source
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2015 Dec;29(12):2369-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
K. Malm
S. Andersson
H. Fredlund
H. Norrgren
A. Biague
F. Månsson
R. Ballard
M. Unemo
Source
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2015 Dec;29(12):2369-76
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Cardiolipins - immunology
Flocculation Tests
Guinea-Bissau
Humans
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Point-of-Care Systems
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Syphilis - diagnosis
Syphilis Serodiagnosis - methods
Treponema pallidum - immunology
Abstract
The diagnosis of syphilis is most frequently dependent on antibody detection with serological assays. Assays for both treponemal and non-treponemal antibodies are needed to provide a sensitive and specific diagnosis. For decades, a first screening has been done with non-treponemal assays, followed by treponemal. However, in recent years, following laboratory automation, the reverse sequence screening algorithms have been developed, using a treponemal assay as the initial screening test.
To evaluate serological assays for treponemal and non-treponemal antibodies, to use in reverse algorithm screening of syphilis.
Six treponemal assays (one IgM-specific assay), two non-treponemal assays and one novel dual point-of-care (POC) assay for serological diagnosis of syphilis were evaluated. Serum samples from Guinea-Bissau and Sweden were examined, as well as two performance panels and samples from blood donors. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each assay, using different assays as gold standard test.
The Macro-Vue RPR Card test was the most sensitive non-treponemal test and the TrepSure Anti-Treponema EIA Screen and the SeroDia TP-PA were the most sensitive and specific treponemal assays. Among the automated assays, both the Liaison Treponema Screen and Architect Syphilis TP showed high sensitivity, however, the former had clearly higher specificity.
In resourced settings, where the reverse sequence algorithm is preferred for screening, an automated treponemal immunoassay for initial screening subsequently followed by the TrepSure test or TP-PA assay as a second treponemal assay appear highly effective. Finally, a quantitative highly sensitive non-treponemal assay, e.g. the Macro-Vue RPR Card test, could then be used as a supplementary test to evaluate activity of the syphilis infection.
PubMed ID
26370737 View in PubMed
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Autoimmune antibodies and pregnancy outcome in women with false-positive syphilis test results. A retrospective controlled investigation of women from 5170 deliveries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65361
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1989;68(6):537-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
R. Henriksen
P E Sögaard
L. Grennert
B U Hansen
R. Manthorpe
I M Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Lund, Malmö General Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1989;68(6):537-40
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antiphospholipid Syndrome - epidemiology - immunology
Autoimmune Diseases - epidemiology - immunology
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - immunology
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Syphilis Serodiagnosis
Abstract
Nine pregnant women with false-positive syphilis test results, and 13 matched controls, were screened for autoimmune antibodies to ascertain whether any relationship might exist between their presence and the occurrence of obstetric problems. Investigations included assays for anti-cardiolipin antibodies (ACA), lupus anticoagulant (LAC), anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) (including antibodies against extractable nuclear antigen), anti-smooth muscle antibodies, anti-mitochondrial antibodies, anti-DNA antibodies, IgM-RF and complement factors. We found no significant difference in the incidence of obstetric problems between the two groups. Except that significantly more women were positive for ACA in the group with false-positive syphilis tests than in the control group, there were no differences between the groups with regard to the antibodies tested for. There was only one case of SLE, a patient positive for LAC, and who had had several miscarriages and no pregnancy resulting in a live birth. Our findings suggest that it would be unwarranted to devote resources to routine screening for these antibodies in healthy women with a false-positive syphilis test result, though the presence of LAC could possibly be used as an indicator of the risk of spontaneous abortion due to SLE.
PubMed ID
2520810 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of primary and late latent syphilis cases which were initially non-reactive with the rapid plasma reagin as the screening test.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156532
Source
Int J STD AIDS. 2008 Jul;19(7):464-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Ameeta E Singh
Tom Wong
Prithwish De
Author Affiliation
Provincial Health Office, Alberta Health and Wellness, Edmonton, AB, Canada. ameeta.singh@gov.ab.ca
Source
Int J STD AIDS. 2008 Jul;19(7):464-8
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta
Child
False Negative Reactions
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Reagins - blood
Syphilis - diagnosis
Syphilis Serodiagnosis - methods
Syphilis, Latent - diagnosis
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim of the study was to determine the characteristics of primary and late latent syphilis cases that were non-reactive on initial screening by rapid plasma reagin (RPR) but reactive by treponemal tests. RPR test results of all primary and late latent syphilis cases in the province of Alberta, Canada during 1980-2001 were compiled. The proportion of syphilis cases that were non-reactive by RPR testing was compared with reactive cases. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with non-reactive RPR results. Among primary syphilis cases, 224 (26%) were non-reactive on initial RPR and were compared with 639 reactive primary cases. Independent factors associated with a non-reactive result were male gender (odds ratio, [OR] = 1.99 [1.22-3.26]), Caucasian ethnicity (OR = 1.77 [1.20-2.61]) and diagnosis during the 1980-1986 syphilis outbreak period in Alberta (OR = 3.13 [1.45-6.74]). Of the late latent cases, 512 (39%) were non-reactive by RPR and 791 were reactive. A non-reactive test for late latent cases was associated with male gender (OR = 2.91 [2.15-3.94]), Canadian Aboriginal (OR = 2.91 [1.59-5.32]), Caucasian (OR = 1.87 [1.35-2.58]), black ethnicity (OR = 1.76 [1.28-2.42]) and diagnosis during the 1980-1986 Alberta syphilis outbreak (OR = 1.67 [1.29-2.16]). RPR testing alone is insufficient to diagnose primary and late latent infections under certain conditions and patient characteristics. Case detection was lower for late latent syphilis when compared with primary syphilis based on the properties of the RPR. Further studies are needed to inform the optimal use of the RPR test in laboratory testing algorithms for the diagnosis of syphilis and to determine the cost effectiveness of better screening tests for syphilis.
PubMed ID
18574118 View in PubMed
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Clinical and epidemiological features of syphilis in pregnant women: the course and outcome of pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63766
Source
Gynecol Obstet Invest. 2001;52(2):114-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
G I Mavrov
T V Goubenko
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dermatology and Venereology, Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkiv, Ukraine. uniidiv@vlink.kharkov.ua
Source
Gynecol Obstet Invest. 2001;52(2):114-8
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Disease Transmission, Vertical
Female
Fetal Diseases - blood - epidemiology - ultrasonography
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - blood - epidemiology - ultrasonography
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prenatal Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serologic Tests
Syphilis - blood - epidemiology - transmission
Syphilis Serodiagnosis
Syphilis, Congenital - blood - epidemiology - ultrasonography
Treponema pallidum - isolation & purification
Abstract
Clinical and epidemiological features of syphilis and the course and outcome of pregnancy were studied in 155 pregnant women infected with syphilis; 95 (61%) women were unemployed, 47% were unmarried. Syphilis proceeded without clinical manifestations in 121 cases (78%). Discordant results of complement fixation (Wassermann) test, precipitation test, Treponema pallidum immobilization test, and fluorescent antibody test were observed in 22 (14%) of the women. Pregnancy pathology was observed in 75 cases (48.8%) and more often appeared as anemia in 49 (31.5%), stillborn in 46 (29.8%) and toxicosis in 44 (28.4%). Fetal ultrasonic stigmas of infection were evident in 23 cases (49%). There was distension of the brain ventricle system and hepatomegaly each in 1 case (2%), transvascular infiltration of liver in 2 cases (4%), dilation of intestinal loops, gastromegaly, ventriculomegaly and petrifaction in lungs each in 1 case; ultrasonic changes in vessels of organs: of the liver in 4 cases (8%), intestines and stomach in 16 cases (32%), lungs in 4 cases (8%), kidneys in 10 cases (21%) and of the ventricular system in 9 cases (19%). Fetus development retardation was revealed in 3 cases (6%), fetal hypoxia in 1 (2%), hypohydrosis in 2 (4%) and hydropsy in 1 case (2%). The pregnancy pathology in women with syphilis was considered not pathognomonic.
PubMed ID
11586039 View in PubMed
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Cost-benefit analysis of a prenatal preventive programme against congenital syphilis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245817
Source
NIPH Ann. 1980 May;3(1):57-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1980
Author
B. Stray-Pedersen
Source
NIPH Ann. 1980 May;3(1):57-66
Date
May-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Norway
Pregnancy
Preventive Health Services - economics
Syphilis Serodiagnosis - economics
Syphilis, Congenital - economics - prevention & control
Abstract
Serologic screening of pregnant women to prevent congenital syphilis has been obligatory in Norway since 1948. Today the incidence of unrecognized, untreated maternal syphilis is approximately 0.2 per 1000 pregnancies. A cost-benefit model is applied to the current prenatal screening programme in Norway. Although may of the benefit parameters are given only an approximate value, or are not valued at all, it was found that the benefit-cost ratio was nearly 2 (1.9), indicating that the economic benefits or savings to the society represent twice the cost of the preventive programme.
PubMed ID
6779243 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Current methods for serological diagnosis of syphilis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132726
Source
Klin Lab Diagn. 2011 May;(5):38-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
S D Zaiko
Source
Klin Lab Diagn. 2011 May;(5):38-41
Date
May-2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Antigens, Bacterial - immunology
Humans
Immunoblotting
Immunosorbent Techniques
Russia
Syphilis - diagnosis - immunology - physiopathology
Syphilis Serodiagnosis - methods - trends
Treponema pallidum - immunology - pathogenicity
Abstract
The paper gives information on novel diagnostic tests based on immunoblotting and immunochromatographic methods used to detect antibodies against Treponema pallidum. Whether these tests should be incorporated into an algorithm of the current serological diagnosis of syphilis is discussed.
PubMed ID
21786613 View in PubMed
Less detail

Early infectious syphilis in Greenland. Epidemiology, treatment and control.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241476
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1983 Nov;30(6):419-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1983

Economic evaluation of maternal screening to prevent congenital syphilis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65690
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 1983 Oct-Dec;10(4):167-72
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Stray-Pedersen
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 1983 Oct-Dec;10(4):167-72
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Humans
Mass Screening - economics
Norway
Pregnancy
Syphilis Serodiagnosis - economics
Syphilis, Congenital - prevention & control - transmission
Abstract
Benefit-cost analysis was applied to a model of first-trimester screening for syphilis where approximately ten new cases of early infections are identified and treated per 50,000 pregnancies. The cost of the screening is estimated to be +4.60 (U. S.) per participating woman, while the benefit-cost ratio was 3.8; thus the economic benefits are nearly four times the cost of the program. Furthermore, there are many other beneficial factors that cannot be evaluated in terms of money. The validity of the results varies with discount rates, frequencies of syphilitic infection, and rates of transmission to the fetus. If the incidence of maternal syphilis is 0.005%, the benefits equal the costs of the prevention program. In Norway, prenatal screening has been obligatory for 30 years. This represents a net benefit, or a total savings, of +8.6 million (U. S.; 1979). From an economic point of view, the first-trimester serologic screening should continue unabridged, whereas an extended preventive program, including premarital screening or additional third-trimester serologic tests, may not be advisable in Norway.
PubMed ID
6665662 View in PubMed
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46 records – page 1 of 5.