Skip header and navigation

Refine By

528 records – page 1 of 53.

Ability to speak at the age of 1 year and alexithymia 30 years later.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30967
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2003 May;54(5):491-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Pirkko Kokkonen
Juha Veijola
Juha T Karvonen
Kristian Läksy
Jari Jokelainen
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Matti Joukamaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. pirkko.kokkonen@oulu.fi
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2003 May;54(5):491-5
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Comorbidity
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Speech Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Time Factors
Verbal Behavior
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We studied the association between speech development in the first year of life and alexithymia in young adulthood. METHODS: The study forms a part of the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort. The original material consisted of all liveborn children in the provinces of Lapland and Oulu in Finland with an expected delivery date during 1966. The comprehensive data collection began during the antenatal phase. In 1997, a 31-year follow-up study was made on a part of the initial sample. The 20-item version of the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) was given to 5983 subjects. Of them, 84% returned the questionnaire properly filled in. The ability to talk was classified according to whether the child spoke no words, one or two words, or three or more words at the age of 1 year. Statistical analyses on the association between the ability to speak at the age of 1 year and alexithymia at the age of 31 years were performed, adjusted for birth weight, mother's parity, place of residence and wantedness of pregnancy. RESULTS: The mean of the total TAS score was lowest among early speakers and for both genders separately. The differences were statistically significant. A parallel significant difference was found among males on TAS Factors 2 and 3 and in case of females on TAS Factors 1 and 3. CONCLUSIONS: We found evidence for an association between speaking development in early childhood and later alexithymia. Our results support the theory that alexithymia may be a developmental process starting in early childhood and reinforcing itself in a social context.
PubMed ID
12726907 View in PubMed
Less detail

Academic performance and mental health in university students. A two-year follow-up study of a sample of first-year students at the University of Uppsala 1968.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66502
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 1973;239:7-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
1973

Acculturative stress among young immigrants in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35385
Source
Scand J Psychol. 1995 Mar;36(1):10-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1995
Author
D L Sam
J W Berry
Author Affiliation
Research Center for Health Promotion, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Scand J Psychol. 1995 Mar;36(1):10-24
Date
Mar-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adjustment Disorders - psychology
Adolescent
Affective Symptoms - psychology
Child
Depressive Disorder - psychology
Developing Countries
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Support
Somatoform Disorders - psychology
Stress, Psychological - complications
Abstract
The study examined the relationship between migration and the incidence of emotional disorders among 568 young Third World immigrants in Norway. Participants were 10-17 years of age. Using a questionnaire, acculturative stress (i.e., change in health status as a result of acculturation) was found to exist among the children, although having to migrate or being born in Norway was not related to mental health status. A stressful acculturative experience (i.e., difficulties in initiating friendship with Norwegian peers) alone could account for only 1% of the self reported emotional disorders. Incidence of depressive tendencies, poor self image, and psychological and somatic symptoms were found to be related to close and supportive parents, marginality, integration, gender and the number of friends the child had. These accounted for between 12 and 15% of the explained variance. The paper theoretically discusses how these factors may be related to acculturative stress, and recommends them as starting points for a primary intervention program to reduce emotional disorders among these children.
PubMed ID
7725073 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active Rheumatoid Arthritis in Central Africa: A Comparative Study Between Sudan and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287360
Source
J Rheumatol. 2016 Oct;43(10):1777-1786
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Amir I Elshafie
Abdalla D Elkhalifa
Sahwa Elbagir
Mawahib I E Aledrissy
Elnour M Elagib
Musa A M Nur
Tomas Weitoft
Johan Rönnelid
Source
J Rheumatol. 2016 Oct;43(10):1777-1786
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy
Biological Products - therapeutic use
Blood Sedimentation
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Humans
Male
Methotrexate - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Prednisolone - therapeutic use
Rheumatoid Factor - blood
Severity of Illness Index
Sudan
Sulfasalazine - therapeutic use
Sweden
Symptom Assessment
Young Adult
Abstract
To compare clinical characteristics and treatment between simultaneously investigated Sudanese and Swedish outpatients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
Outpatients with RA from Sudan (n = 281) and Sweden (n = 542) diagnosed according to the 1987 American College of Rheumatology criteria were recruited between December 2008 and September 2010 and compared concerning clinical presentation, treatment, and laboratory findings, including immunoglobulin M with rheumatoid factor (IgM-RF).
Sudanese patients had lower inclusion age (median 49 vs 68 yrs), disease duration (48 vs 107 mos), and disease onset age (43 vs 56 yrs) as compared with Swedish patients (p
PubMed ID
27481904 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute disaster exposure and mental health complaints of Norwegian tsunami survivors six months post disaster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91783
Source
Psychiatry. 2008;71(3):266-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Heir Trond
Weisaeth Lars
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Center for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Ullevål University Hospital, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. trond.heir@medisin.uio.no
Source
Psychiatry. 2008;71(3):266-76
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology - psychology
Bereavement
Dangerous Behavior
Disasters - statistics & numerical data
Family Relations
Female
Friends
Helping Behavior
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - epidemiology
Survivors - psychology
Abstract
The objective was to investigate the relationship between possible disaster stressors and subsequent health problems among tourists experiencing the 2004 South-East Asia tsunami. A cross-sectional study was performed as a postal survey concerning the experiences of the disaster exposure in retrospect and the presence of psychological symptoms (GHQ-28) in Norwegian tsunami victims 6 months post disaster. The strongest predictors of health complaints were danger of death, witness impressions, and bereavements. Aggravated outcomes were also seen in those who helped others in the acute phase or had sole responsibility for children when the tsunami struck. Having a family member or close friend who was injured was reversely associated with health problems. Women reported more psychological distress than men, but the difference disappeared with increasing degree of danger exposure. Dose-response relationships to psychological distress were found for single exposure factors as well as for the cumulative effects of being exposed to several exposure variables.
PubMed ID
18834277 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescent cannabis use, baseline prodromal symptoms and the risk of psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301353
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2018 04; 212(4):227-233
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Antti Mustonen
Solja Niemelä
Tanja Nordström
Graham K Murray
Pirjo Mäki
Erika Jääskeläinen
Jouko Miettunen
Author Affiliation
Center for Life Course Health Research,University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland and Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu,Oulu,Finland.
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2018 04; 212(4):227-233
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Marijuana Use - epidemiology
Prodromal Symptoms
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Young Adult
Abstract
The association between cannabis use and the risk of psychosis has been studied extensively but the temporal order still remains controversial. Aims To examine the association between cannabis use in adolescence and the risk of psychosis after adjustment for prodromal symptoms and other potential confounders.
The sample (n = 6534) was composed of the prospective general population-based Northern Finland Birth Cohort of 1986. Information on prodromal symptoms of psychosis and cannabis use was collected using questionnaires at age 15-16 years. Participants were followed up for ICD-10 psychotic disorders until age 30 years using nationwide registers.
The risk of psychosis was elevated in individuals who had tried cannabis five times or more (hazard ratio, (HR) = 6.5, 95% CI 3.0-13.9). The association remained statistically significant even when adjusted for prodromal symptoms, other substance use and parental psychosis (HR = 3.0, 95% CI 1.1-8.0).
Adolescent cannabis use is associated with increased risk of psychosis even after adjustment for baseline prodromal symptoms, parental psychosis and other substance use. Declaration of interest None.
PubMed ID
29557758 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescent day program: a two year retrospective review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228644
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1990 Aug;35(6):554-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1990
Author
J M Orchard
R J MacLeod
Author Affiliation
Regional Children's Centre, Windsor Western Hospital, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1990 Aug;35(6):554-6
Date
Aug-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Affective Symptoms - therapy
Day Care - trends
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Ontario
Retrospective Studies
Social Adjustment
Abstract
The place of a psychiatric day treatment program within the spectrum of necessary treatment options is noted in the literature review. A established day program is described with some characteristics of 97 youths attending the program over a two year period. The authors highlight those characteristics which correlate with benefits derived from program attendance.
PubMed ID
2207992 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescent psychosis risk symptoms predicting persistent psychiatric service use: A 7-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298906
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2019 01; 55:102-108
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2019
Author
Maija Lindgren
Minna Jonninen
Markus Jokela
Sebastian Therman
Author Affiliation
Mental Health Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: maija.lindgren@thl.fi.
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2019 01; 55:102-108
Date
01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Prodromal Symptoms
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychopathology
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
We investigated whether psychosis risk symptoms predicted psychiatric service use using seven-year register follow-up data.
Our sample included 715 adolescents aged 15-18, referred to psychiatric care for the first time. Psychosis risk symptoms were assessed with the Prodromal Questionnaire (PQ) at the beginning of the treatment. We assessed the power of the overall PQ as well as its positive, negative, general, and disorganized psychosis risk symptom factors in predicting prolonged service use. Baseline psychiatric diagnoses (grouped into 7 categories) were controlled for. Based on both inpatient and outpatient psychiatric treatment after baseline, adolescents were divided into three groups of brief, intermittent, and persistent service use.
Stronger symptoms on any PQ factor as well as the presence of a mood disorder predicted prolonged service use. All of the PQ factors remained significant predictors when adjusted for baseline mood disorder and multimorbidity.
In a prospective follow-up of a large sample using comprehensive mental health records, our findings indicate that assessing psychosis risk symptoms in clinical adolescent settings at the beginning of treatment could predict long-term need for care beyond diagnostic information. Our findings replicate the previous findings that positive psychosis risk symptoms are unspecific markers of severity of psychopathology. Also psychosis risk symptoms of the negative, disorganization, and general clusters are approximately as strongly associated with prolonged psychiatric service use in the upcoming years.
PubMed ID
30447416 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advancing care for traumatic brain injury: findings from the IMPACT studies and perspectives on future research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106604
Source
Lancet Neurol. 2013 Dec;12(12):1200-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Andrew I R Maas
Gordon D Murray
Bob Roozenbeek
Hester F Lingsma
Isabella Butcher
Gillian S McHugh
James Weir
Juan Lu
Ewout W Steyerberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosurgery, Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Edegem, Belgium. Electronic address: andrew.maas@uza.be.
Source
Lancet Neurol. 2013 Dec;12(12):1200-10
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood pressure
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - therapy
Canada
Data Collection - standards
Disease Management
Europe
Forecasting
Glasgow Coma Scale
Humans
International Cooperation
Middle Aged
Models, Neurological
Multicenter Studies as Topic - methods - standards
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Prognosis
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic - methods - standards
Research Design
Symptom Assessment - standards
Trauma Severity Indices
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
Research in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is challenging for several reasons; in particular, the heterogeneity between patients regarding causes, pathophysiology, treatment, and outcome. Advances in basic science have failed to translate into successful clinical treatments, and the evidence underpinning guideline recommendations is weak. Because clinical research has been hampered by non-standardised data collection, restricted multidisciplinary collaboration, and the lack of sensitivity of classification and efficacy analyses, multidisciplinary collaborations are now being fostered. Approaches to deal with heterogeneity have been developed by the IMPACT study group. These approaches can increase statistical power in clinical trials by up to 50% and are also relevant to other heterogeneous neurological diseases, such as stroke and subarachnoid haemorrhage. Rather than trying to limit heterogeneity, we might also be able to exploit it by analysing differences in treatment and outcome between countries and centres in comparative effectiveness research. This approach has great potential to advance care in patients with TBI.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet Neurol. 2013 Dec;12(12):1132-324139679
PubMed ID
24139680 View in PubMed
Less detail

528 records – page 1 of 53.