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56 records – page 1 of 6.

[A bowed back will become straight and the Winter's back will become bowed].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192223
Source
Duodecim. 1998;114(23):2498-501
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
H. Alaranta
Author Affiliation
Invalidiliiton Käpylän kuntoutuskeskus, Koskelantie 22, 00160 Helsinki. hannu.alaranta@invalidiliitto.fi
Source
Duodecim. 1998;114(23):2498-501
Date
1998
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Back
Back Pain - psychology
Finland
Humans
Language
Symbolism
PubMed ID
11757151 View in PubMed
Less detail

The ambiguity of lesbian and gay marriages: change and continuity in the symbolic order.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33843
Source
J Homosex. 1998;35(3-4):207-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
R. Halvorsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology and Political Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Dragvoll, Norway. runeh@sv.ntnu.no
Source
J Homosex. 1998;35(3-4):207-31
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Family
Female
Homosexuality, Female
Homosexuality, Male - psychology
Humans
Male
Marriage - legislation & jurisprudence
Norway
Politics
Symbolism
Abstract
The article discusses the Registered Partnership Act, passed in Norway in 1993, which has given gay and lesbian couples a right to register their relationship and to obtain many of the legal rights that heterosexual couples have. The article argues that the introduction of the Act is a product of, among others, cohabitation having become more legitimate as a life-form also among heterosexuals. The practical consequences of the Act have been modest, with relatively few couples having registered their relationship. The article suggests that the symbolic rather than the practical aspects of the Act have been important, and even then, the symbolic effect of the Act is equivocal. The new formal rights of gays and lesbians are of decreasing social and symbolic value, as new boundaries for legitimate life-forms are being demarcated elsewhere: While legislation on marriage concedes that personal relationships are a private matter, the right to have and to foster children is regarded as an issue where society at large should have a say. This view is also reflected in the restrictions that the Registered Partnership Act has placed on gay and lesbian couples in having children of their own.
PubMed ID
9638564 View in PubMed
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The anatomy of a forbidden desire: men, penetration and semen exchange.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175938
Source
Nurs Inq. 2005 Mar;12(1):10-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Dave Holmes
Dan Warner
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8M5. dholmes@uottawa.ca
Source
Nurs Inq. 2005 Mar;12(1):10-20
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada
Condoms - utilization
Drive
Europe
Gift Giving
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Homosexuality, Male - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Models, Psychological
Motivation
Nursing Methodology Research
Object Attachment
Pleasure-Pain Principle
Postmodernism
Professional Role
Psychoanalytic Interpretation
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Risk-Taking
Semen
Symbolism
Taboo - psychology
Unsafe Sex - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The rising popularity of unprotected anal sex (bareback sex) among men who have sex with men (MSM) is perplexing healthcare providers working in sexual health clinics. Epidemiological research on the topic overlooks several socio-cultural and psychological dimensions. Our research attempts to construct an appropriate theoretical edifice by which we can understand this sexual practice. In order to achieve this objective, a qualitative design was selected and 18 semiconductive in-depth interviews were carried out with barebackers from five European and North American cities. We then analyzed the data using two theoretical approaches that were sensitive to the issues of desire, transgression and pleasure. These theories are those of the late French psychoanalyst, Jacques Lacan, and those of poststructural thinkers, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari. These theoretical frameworks helped shed light on the significance of bareback sex, and can potentially influence healthcare providers in gaining a better understanding not only of their clients, but also of their own role in the circuitry of desire at work within bareback. We found that while the exchange of semen constitutes a dangerous and irrational practice to healthcare professionals, it is nevertheless a significant variable in the sexual lives of barebackers that needs to be taken into consideration in the provision of healthcare services.
PubMed ID
15743438 View in PubMed
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Awareness and use of the Heart Symbol by Finnish consumers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132272
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Mar;15(3):476-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Marjaana Lahti-Koski
Satu Helakorpi
Mari Olli
Erkki Vartiainen
Pekka Puska
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland. marjaana.lahti-koski@sydanliitto.fi
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Mar;15(3):476-82
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Food Labeling
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Heart
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Symbolism
Young Adult
Abstract
To study the awareness of the Heart Symbol in different age and educational groups, and changes in the awareness over a 9-year period. In addition, the reported use of products with the symbol was examined.
A series of annual cross-sectional postal surveys on Health Behaviour and Health among the Finnish Adult Population.
A random sample (n 5000 per annum) from the Finnish population aged 15-64 years, drawn from the National Population Register, received a questionnaire.
Men and women (n 29 378) participating in the surveys in 2000-2009.
At the early 2000s, 48 % of men and 73 % of women reported to be familiar with the symbol. The corresponding rates were 66 % for men and 91 % for women in 2009. The reported use of products with the symbol increased from 29 % to 52 % in men and from 40 % to 72 % in women. In men, the awareness did not vary by age, whereas older women (45-64 years) were less likely to be aware of the symbol compared with younger women (25-34 years). Men and women with the highest education were best aware of the symbol and more likely to use the products in the early 2000s. The educational differences diminished or disappeared during the study period.
The majority of Finnish adults are familiar with the Heart Symbol, and the reported use of such products increased in all age and educational groups, especially among the less educated. The symbol may work as an effective measure to diminish nutrition-related health inequalities.
Notes
Comment In: Public Health Nutr. 2012 Mar;15(3):483-5; discussion 48621859506
PubMed ID
21835085 View in PubMed
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Balancing between being a person and being a patient-A qualitative study of wearing patient clothing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91995
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2009 Jan;46(1):4-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Edvardsson David
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Umeå University, S-901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2009 Jan;46(1):4-11
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Clothing - psychology
Depersonalization - psychology
Empathy
Existentialism - psychology
Female
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Narration
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Personhood
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Sick Role
Stereotyping
Sweden
Symbolism
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The nursing literature is replete with articles on the function of clothing in preventing and controlling infections. However, although contemporary literature demonstrates intimate connections between clothing and identity, there is a lack of studies which illuminate the meanings associated with wearing patient clothing. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to illuminate the meanings of wearing patient clothing as narrated by patients and nurses in Swedish care settings. DESIGN: The data collection was based on grounded theory. Interviews with patients (n=9) and staff (n=5) were drawn from a larger study and analysed with a phenomenological hermeneutical method. SETTINGS: Data was collected between 2001 and 2003 at a hospice, an in-patient geriatric unit, an acute medical unit, and an in-patient oncology unit in Sweden. RESULTS: The phenomenon of 'wearing patient clothing' was found to consist of four themes: (1) being comfortable and cared for; (2) being depersonalised; (3) being stigmatised; and (4) being devitalised. Interpreted in the light of philosophical literature on identity and symbols, the comprehensive understanding of wearing patient clothing is that it is a balancing between being a person and being a patient. Patient clothes were experienced as being comfortable and practical, but also as being stigmatising symbols of illness, confinement, and depersonalisation. CONCLUSIONS: The tension between patient clothing as being practical and comfortable and at the same time enabling feelings of being depersonalised and stigmatised suggests that nursing staff need to balance the practical benefits of these garments with the social and existential meanings they might have.
PubMed ID
18799159 View in PubMed
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Blind and constructive patriotism, national symbols and outgroup attitudes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277722
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2015 Apr;56(2):189-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Eerika Finell
Cristina Zogmaister
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2015 Apr;56(2):189-97
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Social Identification
Symbolism
Young Adult
Abstract
We examined whether there is a relationship between the different forms patriotism can take (i.e., blind vs. constructive) and different representations of one's own nation. We considered two types of national symbols representing the nation in terms of confrontation between groups (polarized symbols) and as a unique entity (unpolarized symbols). In Study 1 we found that blind patriotism was positively associated with the degree to which individuals perceived their nation through confrontation whereas constructive patriotism was positively associated with the degree to which individuals perceived their nation as unique entity. In Study 2 we tested how the relationship between blind patriotism and outgroup attitudes changed when the nation was defined either through confrontation or as a unique entity. The results emphasize the essential role of the specific meaning associated to the nation when studying patriotism and its relation to outgroup attitudes.
PubMed ID
25614103 View in PubMed
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Caring or uncaring--meanings of being in an oncology environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81329
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2006 Jul;55(2):188-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Edvardsson David
Sandman P O
Rasmussen Birgit
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Umea University, Umea, Sweden. david.edvardsson@nurs.umu.se
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2006 Jul;55(2):188-97
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Existentialism
Female
Health Facility Environment
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology
Oncologic Nursing
Privacy - psychology
Professional-Patient Relations
Self Concept
Symbolism
Abstract
AIM: This paper reports a study illuminating meanings of being in the physical environment of an oncology centre as narrated by patients, significant others and staff. BACKGROUND: The physical environment of hospitals can convey different messages. For example, landscape pictures, plants and comfortable chairs can convey positive messages, while sparsely decorated and run-down environments can convey negative values. Traditional healthcare environments may be experienced as unfamiliar, strange and alienating, fostering feelings of stress and vulnerability. The majority of research on care environments has employed experimental designs to test different environmental variables, for example sound, colour and architecture, in relation to patient outcomes such as recovery, pain and blood pressure. There is, however, little research-based understanding of the meanings of being in these environments. METHODS: A phenomenological hermeneutic approach was applied to analyse 17 interviews with patients, significant others and staff carried out during the spring of 2004 at an oncology centre in Sweden. FINDINGS: The physical environment was found to influence experiences of care in four ways: first, by being a symbol expressing messages of death and dying, danger, shame and stigma, less social value and worth; second by containing symbols expressing messages of caring and uncaring, life and death; third, by influencing interaction and the balance between being involved and finding privacy; and fourth, by containing objects that could facilitate a shift of focus away from the self: being able to escape the world of cancer, and finding light in the midst of darkness. The comprehensive understanding illuminates the physical environment as not merely a place for caring, but as an important part of caring that needs to be accounted for in nursing care. CONCLUSION: To promote well-being among patients, we need to ask ourselves if the environment imposes rather than eases suffering. Our findings also suggest the importance of not limiting our conceptions of nursing to nurse-patient relationships, but of using the therapeutic potential of the total environment in nursing care.
PubMed ID
16866811 View in PubMed
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Communicating via expressive arts: the natural medium of self-expression for hospitalized children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29258
Source
Pediatr Nurs. 2005 Nov-Dec;31(6):480-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Britt-Maj Wikström
Author Affiliation
The Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Pediatr Nurs. 2005 Nov-Dec;31(6):480-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aluminum Silicates
Anxiety, Separation - prevention & control - psychology
Art Therapy - methods
Attitude to Health
Child
Child, Hospitalized - psychology
Communication
Esthetics - psychology
Fear
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Paint
Pediatric Nursing
Play Therapy - methods
Power (Psychology)
Qualitative Research
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Symbolism
Textiles
Abstract
The study was undertaken at a play therapy unit in a Swedish hospital. The purpose was directed toward investigating what takes place during play therapy when children were given the opportunity to use expressive arts such as clay, paint, and/or textile, and the meaning children input into their art objects. The study describes an approach to working with hospitalized children when they visited the play therapy unit. During a three-year period, hospitalized children (n=22) participated in the study. The assumption was that given the opportunity to express themselves freely by using a variety of expressive arts, children will tell what they express in their art works. It might mirror their thoughts and feelings of being hospitalized. The result of the qualitative analyzes generated the themes fear, longing, and powerlessness. The results also showed that expressive arts were a medium for communication. Expressive arts should be used as a tool to help the child express her/himself when being hospitalized.
PubMed ID
16411541 View in PubMed
Less detail

Constructing the symbolic complainant: police subculture and the nonenforcement of protection orders for battered women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216148
Source
Violence Vict. 1995;10(3):227-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
G S Rigakos
Author Affiliation
York University, North York Ontario, Canada.
Source
Violence Vict. 1995;10(3):227-47
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Fantasy
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Imagination
Male
Organizational Culture
Social Control, Formal
Social Responsibility
Spouse Abuse - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - psychology
Stereotyping
Symbolism
Women's Rights
Abstract
This exploratory study examines the effects of patriarchy on police and individual attitudes toward the enforcement of protective court orders for battered women. Police officers (N = 13) and justice officials (N = 8) in the Municipality of Delta were interviewed for their opinions on the efficacy of both Criminal Code peace bonds and Family Relations Act (R.S.B.C., amended 1986) civil restraining orders. Interview data suggest that both protective orders are rarely treated seriously by the police or the courts. It is argued that the occupational culture of the police leads to exaggerated patriarchal notions of women, marriage, and family that are conservative; blame the victim; point finger at other institutions; foster images of women as manipulative; and produce a fictitious narrative of battered women.
PubMed ID
8777189 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Dear physicians and physicians to be].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170367
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Mar 6;168(10):1046-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-6-2006
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Mar 6;168(10):1046-7
Date
Mar-6-2006
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
Physician-Patient Relations
Religion and Medicine
Students, Medical
Symbolism
PubMed ID
16522308 View in PubMed
Less detail

56 records – page 1 of 6.