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Actinobacillus infections in swine [author's transl].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14742
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1977 Mar;29(3):137-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1977
Author
K B Pedersen
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1977 Mar;29(3):137-40
Date
Mar-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinobacillus Infections - epidemiology - veterinary
Age Factors
Animals
Bacteriological Techniques
Denmark
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
Actinobacilli infections in pigs are relatively rare. Most cases were septicaemic in the first week of life. With increasing age manifestations after generalized infections were characteristic, such as arthritis, polyarthritis, endocarditis, nephritis, osteomyelitis and embolic pneumonia. Of 34 porcine strains 33 were identified as A. equuli and only one was identical with A. suis. The justification of retaining this species is discussed.
PubMed ID
323819 View in PubMed
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Acute selenium poisoning from selenium-containing iron supplement in suckling pigs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75515
Source
Vet Hum Toxicol. 2003 Feb;45(1):31-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Tore Sivertsen
Anne Jørgensen
Aksel Bernhoft
Gunnar A Sylliaas
Hilde Magda Juul
Børge Baustad
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, PO Box 8146 Dep, 0033 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Vet Hum Toxicol. 2003 Feb;45(1):31-2
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Dietary Supplements
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Iron - administration & dosage
Norway - epidemiology
Poisoning - epidemiology - etiology - veterinary
Selenium - blood - poisoning
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
We report an outbreak of acute selenium poisoning among suckling pigs; 92 piglets were found dead or moribund without preceding symptoms. Necropsy revealed acute congestion of liver and small intestine. The source was a powdered iron supplement contaminated by sodium selenite.
PubMed ID
12583694 View in PubMed
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Adverse effects of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection on growth performance of Norwegian pigs - a longitudinal study at a boar testing station.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268428
Source
BMC Vet Res. 2014;10:284
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Chiek Er
Bjørn Lium
Saraya Tavornpanich
Peer Ola Hofmo
Hilde Forberg
Anna Germundsson Hauge
Carl Andreas Grøntvedt
Tore Framstad
Edgar Brun
Source
BMC Vet Res. 2014;10:284
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Asymptomatic Infections
Body Weight
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Orthomyxoviridae Infections - complications - veterinary - virology
Swine - growth & development - virology
Swine Diseases - virology
Abstract
Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection in Norwegian pigs was largely subclinical. This study tested the hypothesis that the infection causes negligible impact on pigs' growth performance in terms of feed conversion efficiency, daily feed intake, daily growth, age on reaching 100 kg bodyweight and overall feed intake. A sample of 1955 pigs originating from 43 breeding herds was classified into five infection status groups; seronegative pigs (n = 887); seropositive pigs (n = 874); pigs positive for virus at bodyweight between 33 kg and 60 kg (n = 123); pigs positive for virus at bodyweight between 61 kg and 80 kg (n = 34) and pigs positive for virus at bodyweight between 81 kg and 100 kg (n = 37). Each pig had daily recordings of feed intake and bodyweight from 33 kg to 100 kg. Marginal effects of the virus infection on the outcomes were estimated by multi-level linear regression, which accounted for known fixed effects (breed, birthdate, average daily feed intake and growth phase) and random effects (cluster effects of pig and herd).
The seropositive and virus positive pigs had decreased (P value
Notes
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Cites: PLoS One. 2010;5(2):e906820140096
PubMed ID
25472551 View in PubMed
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Age-dependent occurrence of the intestinal ciliate Balantidium coli in pigs at a Danish research farm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63919
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2000;41(1):79-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
O. Hindsbo
C V Nielsen
J. Andreassen
A L Willingham
M. Bendixen
M A Nielsen
N O Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Ecology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. ohindsbo@zi.ku.dk
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2000;41(1):79-83
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Animals, Suckling
Balantidiasis - epidemiology - parasitology - veterinary
Balantidium - isolation & purification
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Feces - parasitology
Female
Lactation
Parasite Egg Count - veterinary
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Parasitic - epidemiology - parasitology - veterinary
Prevalence
Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
Statistics, nonparametric
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology
Abstract
A cross sectional study of the prevalence and intensity of Balantidium coli in pigs was carried out on a Danish research farm. The prevalence of B. coli infection increased from 57% in suckling piglets to 100% in most pig groups > or = 4 weeks old. The mean number of cysts per gram faeces (CPG) of pigs aged 12 weeks and younger were 52 weeks had significantly higher counts of > or = 865 CPG. Although some lactating sows had very high CPG's, no significant differences in CPG could be detected between the intensities of pregnant sows, lactating sows and empty and dry sows. No human cases of B. coli infection have been published in Denmark though it is zoonotic.
PubMed ID
10920478 View in PubMed
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Analysis, occurrence and control of Ochratoxin A residues in Danish pig kidneys.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75649
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1985 Jul-Sep;2(3):193-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
N B Büchmann
B. Hald
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1985 Jul-Sep;2(3):193-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Denmark
Food Microbiology
Kidney - analysis - microbiology
Kidney Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - veterinary
Ochratoxins - analysis - poisoning
Swine
Swine Diseases - etiology
Abstract
In Denmark, porcine kidneys displaying macroscopic lesions of mycotoxic nephropathy are analysed for Ochratoxin A and the carcass condemned if the concentration exceeds 25 micrograms/kg. Since late 1982 these analyses have been conducted centrally. The reliability of the one-dimensional thin layer chromatographic method is discussed and results from an interlaboratory comparison are presented. From 1980 to 1984 there has been an overall decline in the rate of ochratoxicosis, interrupted in 1983 by a major increase geographically located in the northern half of Jutland. During that year 7639 kidneys were examined; 3% contained more than 150 micrograms/kg and 29% more than 25 micrograms/kg Ochratoxin A, corresponding to a condemnation rate of 15 per 100 000 slaughterings. The early stage of the increased incidence was characterized by kidneys with extremely high levels of the toxin; later most of the samples were negative or near-negative, as affected pigs were presumably fed a toxin-free diet before slaughtering. The efficacy of the control program is discussed in view of the 1983 data.
PubMed ID
4043442 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of the Norwegian Salmonella surveillance and control program in live pig and pork.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75531
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2002 Jan 30;72(1-2):1-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-2002
Author
Marianne Sandberg
Petter Hopp
Jorun Jarp
Eystein Skjerve
Author Affiliation
The National Veterinary Institute, Oslo, Norway. marianne.sandberg@vetinst.no
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2002 Jan 30;72(1-2):1-11
Date
Jan-30-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abattoirs - standards
Animals
Female
Food Contamination
Humans
Male
Meat - microbiology
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Salmonella - isolation & purification
Salmonella Food Poisoning - prevention & control
Salmonella Infections, Animal - epidemiology - microbiology
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Population data and apparent prevalence data from the Salmonella surveillance and control program in pigs (NSSCP) from 1998 and 1999 were used in a simulation model to evaluate the efficacy of the program. The model consists of three parts: modelling of individual prevalence at the abattoir (abattoir part), modelling of the number of sampled herds of different sizes when carcasses are randomly sampled at the abattoir (sampling strategy part) and finally, modelling of the within herd prevalence (within herd part). A total of 136,550 sows and 2,866,550 finishing pigs slaughtered, 4446 herds and 11 herds positive for Salmonella in 1994/1995-2000 were included in the abattoir part, sampling strategy part and the within herd part of the model, respectively. The abattoir part showed an average estimated prevalence of Salmonella in sows and finishing pigs of (median) 0.4% (5-95 percentiles = 0.03-2%) and 0.1% (0.04-0.2%) respectively. The estimated number of infected sow carcasses that entered the market was 502 (37-2157) while the estimated number of finishing pig carcasses was 2919 (1218-5771). The probability of being sampled for the 10% smallest herds was (mean) 1.9% (1.6-2.2), to 25% (24.7-26.5%) for the 10% largest herds. The within herd prevalence was estimated to be from 1% to 4% for Norwegian pig herds. The conclusions drawn from this evaluation are that the NSSCP does not have any significant consumer protection effect, and that the documentation could be done more effectively using the herd rather than the individual animal as the unit of sampling. Sampling should focus on the larger herds supplying most of the meat on the market and on herds that produce breeding sows and piglets and thus can contribute to the spread of Salmonella among herds.
PubMed ID
11843400 View in PubMed
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Animal health and environment in the production of fattening pigs. A study of disease incidence in relation to certain environmental factors, daily weight gain and carcass classification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14788
Source
Acta Vet Scand Suppl. 1974;(51):1-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
1974

An investigation into human pandemic influenza virus (H1N1) 2009 on an Alberta swine farm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145722
Source
Can Vet J. 2009 Nov;50(11):1153-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Krista J Howden
Egan J Brockhoff
Francois D Caya
Laura J McLeod
Martin Lavoie
Joan D Ing
Janet M Bystrom
Soren Alexandersen
John M Pasick
Yohannes Berhane
Margaret E Morrison
Julia M Keenliside
Sonja Laurendeau
Elizabeth B Rohonczy
Author Affiliation
Terrestrial Animal Health Division, Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Ottawa, Ontario. Krista.Howden@inspection.gc.ca
Source
Can Vet J. 2009 Nov;50(11):1153-61
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Animals
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Euthanasia, Animal
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - transmission - virology
Orthomyxoviridae Infections - epidemiology - transmission - veterinary - virology
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - transmission - virology
Zoonoses
Abstract
On May 2, 2009 the Canadian Food Inspection Agency notified the World Organization for Animal Health that an emerging novel influenza A virus (pandemic H1N1 2009) had been confirmed on a swine farm in Alberta. Over a 4-week period pigs in this farrow-to-finish operation were clinically affected by respiratory disease consistent with an influenza A virus infection and the presence of active viral infection was confirmed in all production areas by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Despite clinical recovery of animals, there was reluctance by purchasers to receive animals from this operation due to concerns about the effect on both domestic and international markets. The owner decided to depopulate the entire herd due to impending welfare issues associated with overcrowding and economic concerns resulting from the inability to market these animals. Carcasses were rendered or composted and did not enter the human food or animal feed chain. The source of virus in this herd was determined to be an infected human. Zoonotic transmission to 2 individuals responding to the outbreak was suspected and recommendations to prevent occupational exposure are discussed.
Notes
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2007 Apr 15;44(8):1084-817366454
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2000 Nov;38(11):4096-10111060074
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2007 Dec;13(12):1871-818258038
Cites: Vet Res. 2007 Mar-Apr;38(2):243-6017257572
Cites: Arch Virol. 2000;145(7):1399-41910963345
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2002 Sep;40(9):3256-6012202562
Comment In: Can Vet J. 2010 Dec;51(12):1315-821358923
PubMed ID
20119537 View in PubMed
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252 records – page 1 of 26.