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772 records – page 1 of 78.

'1001' Campylobacters: cultural characteristics of intestinal campylobacters from man and animals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245183
Source
J Hyg (Lond). 1980 Dec;85(3):427-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1980
Author
M B Skirrow
J. Benjamin
Source
J Hyg (Lond). 1980 Dec;85(3):427-42
Date
Dec-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Campylobacter - cytology - drug effects - isolation & purification
Cattle - microbiology
Culture Media
Dogs - microbiology
Humans
Intestines - microbiology
Metronidazole - pharmacology
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Swine - microbiology
Temperature
Abstract
The cultural characteristics of 1220 Campylobacter strains from a variety of sources are described. Forty-two were identified as Campylobacter fetus ssp. fetus (Véron & Chatelain, 1973), 1120 as members of the C. jejuni/C. coli group, and 58 did not conform to any known description. Sixteen of the latter strains had the basic characteristics of C. fetus but were atypical in certain other respects. The other 42 strains had the thermophilic characteristics of the jejuni/coli group, but were resistant to nalidixic acid and had other features in common; it is possible that they represent a new species. They were isolated from 19% of locally caught wild seagulls but only occasionally from other animals and man.Growth at 25 degrees C clearly distinguished strains of C. fetus from those of the jejuni/coli and the nalidixic acid-resistant thermophilic (NARTC) groups. Maximum growth temperature was less reliable for this purpose, and 43 degrees C was found to be better than the traditional 42 degrees C. By arranging the results of three tests (tolerance to 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride, growth at 30.5 and 45.5 degrees C) serially in the form of a schema comprising nine categories, the jejuni/coli strains fell into two main groups resembling the Institute Pasteur C. jejuni and C. coli type strains, but these groups could not be clearly defined owing to the existence of strains with intermediate characteristics.Most of the strains from cattle resembled C. jejuni, whereas those from pigs resembled C. coli; poultry strains occupied a more intermediate position. Strains from man and other animals were of mixed types, but most human strains resembled C. jejuni rather than C. coli. The type distribution pattern that most nearly matched that of human indigenous strains was given by a half-and-half mixture of strains from cattle and poultry.
Notes
Cites: J Pediatr. 1973 Mar;82(3):493-54572934
Cites: Br Med J. 1977 Jul 2;2(6078):9-11871765
Cites: Can J Microbiol. 1977 Sep;23(9):1311-371191
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1978 Jul;8(1):36-41670386
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1978 Oct;14(4):553-6718153
Cites: Can J Microbiol. 1979 Jan;25(1):1-7427650
Cites: Can J Microbiol. 1979 Jan;25(1):8-16218715
Cites: Vet Rec. 1979 Oct 6;105(14):333117609
Cites: Br Med J. 1980 May 31;280(6227):1301-27388519
Cites: J Bacteriol. 1953 Jul;66(1):24-613069461
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1957 Sep-Oct;101(2):119-2813475869
PubMed ID
7462593 View in PubMed
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Aberrant expression of miR-218 and miR-204 in human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis-convergence on axonal guidance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260948
Source
Epilepsia. 2014 Dec;55(12):2017-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Sanne S Kaalund
Morten T Venø
Mads Bak
Rikke S Møller
Henning Laursen
Flemming Madsen
Helle Broholm
Bjørn Quistorff
Peter Uldall
Niels Tommerup
Sakari Kauppinen
Anne Sabers
Kees Fluiter
Lisbeth B Møller
Anne Y Nossent
Asli Silahtaroglu
Jørgen Kjems
Eleonora Aronica
Zeynep Tümer
Source
Epilepsia. 2014 Dec;55(12):2017-27
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Embryo, Mammalian
Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe - complications - metabolism - pathology
Female
Gene Expression Profiling
Gene Expression Regulation - physiology
Glutamate Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Hippocampus - metabolism
Humans
Male
MicroRNAs - metabolism
Middle Aged
Nerve Tissue Proteins - metabolism
Netherlands
Pyramidal Cells - metabolism - pathology
Receptors, Metabotropic Glutamate - metabolism
Reproducibility of Results
Sclerosis - etiology - pathology
Sequence Analysis, RNA
Swine
Young Adult
Abstract
Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is one of the most common types of the intractable epilepsies and is most often associated with hippocampal sclerosis (HS), which is characterized by pronounced loss of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. microRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to be dysregulated in epilepsy and neurodegenerative diseases, and we hypothesized that miRNAs could be involved in the pathogenesis of MTLE and HS.
miRNA expression was quantified in hippocampal specimens from human patients using miRNA microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction RT-PCR, and by RNA-seq on fetal brain specimens from domestic pigs. In situ hybridization was used to show the spatial distribution of miRNAs in the human hippocampus. The potential effect of miRNAs on targets genes was investigated using the dual luciferase reporter gene assay.
miRNA expression profiling showed that 25 miRNAs were up-regulated and 5 were down-regulated in hippocampus biopsies of MTLE/HS patients compared to controls. We showed that miR-204 and miR-218 were significantly down-regulated in MTLE and HS, and both were expressed in neurons in all subfields of normal hippocampus. Moreover, miR-204 and miR-218 showed strong changes in expression during fetal development of the hippocampus in pigs, and we identified four target genes, involved in axonal guidance and synaptic plasticity, ROBO1, GRM1, SLC1A2, and GNAI2, as bona fide targets of miR-218. GRM1 was also shown to be a direct target of miR-204.
miR-204 and miR-218 are developmentally regulated in the hippocampus and may contribute to the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of MTLE and HS.
PubMed ID
25410734 View in PubMed
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Source
Acta Vet Scand. 1970;11(3):390-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1970
Author
J. Aamdal
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 1970;11(3):390-3
Date
1970
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Veterinary - epidemiology - etiology
Animals
Female
Norway
Pregnancy
Swine
Time Factors
PubMed ID
5528633 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accelerated lung function decline in swine confinement workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208355
Source
Chest. 1997 Jun;111(6):1733-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
A. Senthilselvan
J A Dosman
S P Kirychuk
E M Barber
C S Rhodes
Y. Zhang
T S Hurst
Author Affiliation
Centre for Agricultural Medicine, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Chest. 1997 Jun;111(6):1733-41
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - physiology
Agriculture
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Cereals
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Lung - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Respiratory Function Tests - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population
Saskatchewan
Smoking - physiopathology
Swine
Abstract
We conducted a longitudinal study to determine the annual rate decline in pulmonary function measurements in male swine confinement workers. For comparison, a grain farming group and a nonfarming rural-dwelling control group were also chosen for the longitudinal study. Two hundred seventeen swine confinement workers, 218 grain farmers, and 179 nonfarming control subjects had valid pulmonary function measurements at the baseline observation conducted in 1990 to 1991 and at the second observation conducted in 1994 to 1995. The swine confinement workers were younger (mean age=38.3+/-11.7 [SD] years) than the nonfarming control subjects (42.6+/-10.4 years) and the grain farmers (44.5+/-11.9 years). When stratified by age, nonfarming control subjects had the lowest mean annual rate decline in FEV1 and FVC in all age categories. The swine confinement workers had the largest annual rate decline in FEV1 and FVC, and this was most obvious in the middle age categories. After controlling for age, height, smoking, and baseline pulmonary function, swine confinement workers had excess annual decline of 26.1 mL in FEV1 (p=0.0005), 33.5 mL in FVC (p=0.0002), and 42.0 mL/s in forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of FVC (FEF[25-75%]) (p=0.02) over nonfarming control subjects. Grain farmers had excess annual decline of 16.4 mL in FEV1 (p=0.03), 26.7 mL in FVC (p=0.002), and 11.2 mL/s in FEF(25-75%) (p=0.38) over control subjects. These findings suggest that workers engaged in the swine industry and grain farmers appear prone to accelerated yearly losses in lung function and may therefore be at risk for the future development of chronic airflow limitation.
PubMed ID
9187201 View in PubMed
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Actinobacillus infections in swine [author's transl].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14742
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1977 Mar;29(3):137-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1977
Author
K B Pedersen
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1977 Mar;29(3):137-40
Date
Mar-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinobacillus Infections - epidemiology - veterinary
Age Factors
Animals
Bacteriological Techniques
Denmark
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
Actinobacilli infections in pigs are relatively rare. Most cases were septicaemic in the first week of life. With increasing age manifestations after generalized infections were characteristic, such as arthritis, polyarthritis, endocarditis, nephritis, osteomyelitis and embolic pneumonia. Of 34 porcine strains 33 were identified as A. equuli and only one was identical with A. suis. The justification of retaining this species is discussed.
PubMed ID
323819 View in PubMed
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[Action of natural gamma-interferons on functional activity of phagocytes and antibody synthesis after vaccination]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57493
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 2000 Nov-Dec;62(6):26-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ia G Kishko
M I Vasylenko
Author Affiliation
Institute of Microbiology and Virology, Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences, 154 Zabolotny St., Kyiv, 03143, Ukraine.
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 2000 Nov-Dec;62(6):26-32
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Antibodies, Bacterial - biosynthesis
Bacterial Vaccines - immunology
Cattle
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Escherichia coli - immunology
Female
Interferon Type II - immunology - pharmacology
Phagocytes - drug effects - immunology - physiology
Swine - immunology
Vaccination
Abstract
Natural swine and cattle gamma-IFNs were prepared for trials. One dose of gamma-suiferon contained 1000 IU, that of gamma-boviferon--2000 IU. Three series of researches were carried out to estimate the in vitro and in vivo absorbing activity of phagocytes (monocytes and neutrophiles), their bactericidal ability (on new born pigs and calves, 2 months old animals, sows and cows with calf) and antibodygenesis after immunization of animals by colibacteriosis vaccine. It has been shown in trials that gamma-IFN increased to significant degree (several times, as a rule) the absorbing activity of phagocytes (especially that of monocytes in new-born animals). At the same time bactericidal activity of phagocytes sharply increased--their functional reserve in experimental animals was significantly higher (2-3-times), than in control. Immunization by colinebacteriosis vaccine with additional treatment by homologous gamma-IFN 3-4 times increased antibodygenesis in comparison with control.
PubMed ID
11247346 View in PubMed
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Acute homing of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells in intramyocardial vs. intracoronary transplantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98984
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2009 Dec;43(6):366-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Jussi Mäkelä
Vesa Anttila
Kari Ylitalo
Reijo Takalo
Siri Lehtonen
Timo Mäkikallio
Eija Niemelä
Sebastian Dahlbacka
Jonne Tikkanen
Kai Kiviluoma
Tatu Juvonen
Petri Lehenkari
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, University of Oulu and Clinical Research Center, 90221, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2009 Dec;43(6):366-73
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bone Marrow Transplantation - methods
Cell Survival - drug effects
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation - methods
Hematopoietic Stem Cells - physiology
Indium Radioisotopes - adverse effects - diagnostic use
Infusions, Intra-Arterial
Injections, Intramuscular
Myocardial Infarction - radionuclide imaging - surgery
Swine
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Cell homing optimisation after transplantation is critical in myocardial infarction (MI) cell therapy. DESIGN: Eight pigs were randomized to receiving autologous purified (111)indium-labeled bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) (10(8) cells/2 ml) by intramyocardial (IM) (n=4) or by intracoronary (IC) (n=4) transplantation after 90 minutes occlusion of the CX-coronary artery. Dual isotope SPECT imaging was performed 2 and 24 hours postoperatively. Two animals were additionally analyzed on the sixth postoperative day. Tissue samples from the major organs were analyzed. RESULTS: In SPECT imaging revealed that BMMCs administered using IM injection remained in the injured area. In contrast, minor proportion of IC transplanted cells remained in the myocardium, as most of the cells showed homing in the lungs. Analysis of the biopsies showed a seven-fold greater number of cells in the myocardium for the IM method and a 10-fold greater number of cells in the lungs in the IC group (p
PubMed ID
19544220 View in PubMed
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Acute selenium poisoning from selenium-containing iron supplement in suckling pigs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75515
Source
Vet Hum Toxicol. 2003 Feb;45(1):31-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Tore Sivertsen
Anne Jørgensen
Aksel Bernhoft
Gunnar A Sylliaas
Hilde Magda Juul
Børge Baustad
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, PO Box 8146 Dep, 0033 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Vet Hum Toxicol. 2003 Feb;45(1):31-2
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Dietary Supplements
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Iron - administration & dosage
Norway - epidemiology
Poisoning - epidemiology - etiology - veterinary
Selenium - blood - poisoning
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
We report an outbreak of acute selenium poisoning among suckling pigs; 92 piglets were found dead or moribund without preceding symptoms. Necropsy revealed acute congestion of liver and small intestine. The source was a powdered iron supplement contaminated by sodium selenite.
PubMed ID
12583694 View in PubMed
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Adverse effects of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection on growth performance of Norwegian pigs - a longitudinal study at a boar testing station.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268428
Source
BMC Vet Res. 2014;10:284
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Chiek Er
Bjørn Lium
Saraya Tavornpanich
Peer Ola Hofmo
Hilde Forberg
Anna Germundsson Hauge
Carl Andreas Grøntvedt
Tore Framstad
Edgar Brun
Source
BMC Vet Res. 2014;10:284
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Asymptomatic Infections
Body Weight
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Orthomyxoviridae Infections - complications - veterinary - virology
Swine - growth & development - virology
Swine Diseases - virology
Abstract
Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection in Norwegian pigs was largely subclinical. This study tested the hypothesis that the infection causes negligible impact on pigs' growth performance in terms of feed conversion efficiency, daily feed intake, daily growth, age on reaching 100 kg bodyweight and overall feed intake. A sample of 1955 pigs originating from 43 breeding herds was classified into five infection status groups; seronegative pigs (n = 887); seropositive pigs (n = 874); pigs positive for virus at bodyweight between 33 kg and 60 kg (n = 123); pigs positive for virus at bodyweight between 61 kg and 80 kg (n = 34) and pigs positive for virus at bodyweight between 81 kg and 100 kg (n = 37). Each pig had daily recordings of feed intake and bodyweight from 33 kg to 100 kg. Marginal effects of the virus infection on the outcomes were estimated by multi-level linear regression, which accounted for known fixed effects (breed, birthdate, average daily feed intake and growth phase) and random effects (cluster effects of pig and herd).
The seropositive and virus positive pigs had decreased (P value
Notes
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PubMed ID
25472551 View in PubMed
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African swine fever: an epidemiological update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263641
Source
Transbound Emerg Dis. 2012 Mar;59 Suppl 1:27-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
J M Sánchez-Vizcaíno
L. Mur
B. Martínez-López
Source
Transbound Emerg Dis. 2012 Mar;59 Suppl 1:27-35
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Africa, Southern - epidemiology
African Swine Fever - epidemiology - prevention & control
African Swine Fever Virus - immunology
Animals
Communicable Diseases, Emerging - prevention & control - veterinary
Europe - epidemiology
Global health
Russia - epidemiology
Swine
Abstract
African swine fever (ASF) is one of the most important swine diseases, mainly because of its significant sanitary and socioeconomic consequences. This review gives an update on the epidemiology of the disease and reviews key issues and strategies to improve control of the disease and promote its eradication. Several characteristics of ASF virus (ASFV) make its control and eradication difficult, including the absence of available vaccines, marked virus resistance in infected material and contaminated animal products, and a complex epidemiology and transmission involving tick reservoir virus interactions. The incidence of ASF has not only increased on the African continent over the last 15 years, so that it now affects West African countries, Mauritius and Madagascar, but it has also reached new areas, such as the Caucasus region in 2007. In fact, the rapid spread of the disease on the European continent and the uncontrolled situation in the Russian Federation places all countries at great risk as a result of intense global trade. The proximity of some affected areas to the European Union (EU) borders (
PubMed ID
22225967 View in PubMed
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772 records – page 1 of 78.