Skip header and navigation

Refine By

71 records – page 1 of 8.

Source
Laeknabladid. 2010 Oct;96(10):626-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Kristín Magnúsdóttir
Jakop Kristinsson
Borkell Jóhannesson
Author Affiliation
kristmag@hi.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2010 Oct;96(10):626-8
Date
Oct-2010
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects - analysis
Ethylene Glycol - analysis
Food Contamination - legislation & jurisprudence
Food Labeling
Food Preservatives - analysis
Fraud
Humans
Iceland
Methanol - analysis
Sweetening Agents - analysis
Abstract
Adulterated alcoholic beverages are legal alcoholic products that have been illicitly tampered with, for instance, by criminally diluting them with water, purposely putting them into new containers to conceal their true origin or adding toxic substances to manipulate the qualities of alcoholic beverages. The collection of cases at the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Iceland, which contains examples of each category of adulteration, is the basis of the present article. Especially noteworthy are cases involving the toxic substances methanol and/or ethylene glycol. Methanol has been added to legally produced wines to increase their "bite" and ethylene glycol to increase their sweetness. Adding these substances to wine has resulted in poisoning or death in other countries, but not in Iceland as far as is known.
PubMed ID
20959682 View in PubMed
Less detail

Artificial sweeteners and absence of bladder cancer risk in Copenhagen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26887
Source
Int J Cancer. 1983 Nov 15;32(5):577-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1983
Author
O. Møller-Jensen
J B Knudsen
B L Sørensen
J. Clemmesen
Source
Int J Cancer. 1983 Nov 15;32(5):577-82
Date
Nov-15-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages
Bladder Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Denmark
Diabetes Complications
Diabetes Mellitus - drug therapy
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Male
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk
Smoking
Sweetening Agents - toxicity
Time Factors
Abstract
During the years 1979 to 1981 a population-based case-control study of bladder cancer including papillomas was performed in Greater Copenhagen. After exclusions some 388 patients (290 males; 98 females) and an age- and sex-matched group of 787 controls (592 males; 195 females) remained for analysis. Controls were selected at random from the general population of the study area. All persons were interviewed concerning use of artificial sweeteners in addition to their exposure to a number of other known or suspected risk factors for bladder cancer. Fifty-five male bladder cancer patients (19.4%) and 150 controls (25.7%) had at some time used artificial sweeteners regularly. Among females 27.1% of cases and 25.9% of controls regularly used sweeteners. In neither sex was the relative risk significantly increased in users compared with non-users of artificial sweeteners. The relative risk of 0.78 in the two sexes combined was not significantly different from 1.0 (95% C.I.: 0.58-1.05). There was no indication of a regular increase in risk with increasing daily consumption of table-top sweeteners nor was there any indication of an increase in risk with a duration of regular use of artificial sweeteners. Taking into account a possible latency period between first regular use and bladder cancer development did not change the finding of an absence of association between use of artificial sweeteners and the risk of bladder cancer. Neither saccharine nor cyclamate users had an increased risk of bladder cancer. This population-based case-control investigation provides further evidence that it is highly unlikely that the consumption of artificial sweeteners has contributed to current bladder cancer rates in man.
PubMed ID
6642755 View in PubMed
Less detail

Artificial sweeteners in a large Canadian river reflect human consumption in the watershed.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257215
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(12):e82706
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
John Spoelstra
Sherry L Schiff
Susan J Brown
Author Affiliation
Water Science and Technology Directorate, Environment Canada, Burlington, Ontario, Canada ; Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(12):e82706
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Fresh Water - analysis - chemistry
Geography
Humans
Ontario
Rivers - chemistry
Sweetening Agents - analysis - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - chemistry
Abstract
Artificial sweeteners have been widely incorporated in human food products for aid in weight loss regimes, dental health protection and dietary control of diabetes. Some of these widely used compounds can pass non-degraded through wastewater treatment systems and are subsequently discharged to groundwater and surface waters. Measurements of artificial sweeteners in rivers used for drinking water production are scarce. In order to determine the riverine concentrations of artificial sweeteners and their usefulness as a tracer of wastewater at the scale of an entire watershed, we analyzed samples from 23 sites along the entire length of the Grand River, a large river in Southern Ontario, Canada, that is impacted by agricultural activities and urban centres. Municipal water from household taps was also sampled from several cities within the Grand River Watershed. Cyclamate, saccharin, sucralose, and acesulfame were found in elevated concentrations despite high rates of biological activity, large daily cycles in dissolved oxygen and shallow river depth. The maximum concentrations that we measured for sucralose (21 µg/L), cyclamate (0.88 µg/L), and saccharin (7.2 µg/L) are the highest reported concentrations of these compounds in surface waters to date anywhere in the world. Acesulfame persists at concentrations that are up to several orders of magnitude above the detection limit over a distance of 300 km and it behaves conservatively in the river, recording the wastewater contribution from the cumulative population in the basin. Acesulfame is a reliable wastewater effluent tracer in rivers. Furthermore, it can be used to assess rates of nutrient assimilation, track wastewater plume dilution, separate human and animal waste contributions and determine the relative persistence of emerging contaminants in impacted watersheds where multiple sources confound the usefulness of other tracers. The effects of artificial sweeteners on aquatic biota in rivers and in the downstream Great Lakes are largely unknown.
Notes
Cites: Food Chem Toxicol. 2011 Oct;49(10):2575-921742009
Cites: Water Res. 2011 Jul;45(13):4019-2721665241
Cites: Chemosphere. 2012 Jan;86(1):50-521955350
Cites: Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2012;29(1):54-6522088137
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2012 Jul 15;430:8-1922609959
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Feb 15;45(4):1363-921235203
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2013 Sep 1;461-462:348-5923738987
Cites: Appl Microbiol Biotechnol. 1994 Oct;42(1):173-87765816
Cites: Food Addit Contam. 1999 Mar;16(3):99-10910492702
Cites: Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2008 Jun;25(6):662-818484294
Cites: J Chromatogr A. 2009 Feb 13;1216(7):1126-3119131070
Cites: Anal Bioanal Chem. 2009 Jul;394(6):1585-9419533103
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2009 Jun 15;43(12):4381-519603650
Cites: Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2008 Nov;25(11):1291-619680835
Cites: J Chromatogr A. 2010 Jun 18;1217(25):4127-3420304407
Cites: Water Res. 2010 Jun;44(12):3573-8420462625
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Jan 15;45(2):615-2121142066
Cites: Environ Toxicol Chem. 2011 Mar;30(3):673-8121154846
Cites: Environ Pollut. 2011 May;159(5):1419-2621310517
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Oct 15;45(20):8716-2221879743
PubMed ID
24349342 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between added sugar intake and dental caries in Yup'ik children using a novel hair biomarker.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299044
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2015 Oct 09; 15(1):121
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
Oct-09-2015
Author
Donald L Chi
Scarlett Hopkins
Diane O'Brien
Lloyd Mancl
Eliza Orr
Dane Lenaker
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Health Sciences, University of Washington School of Dentistry, Box 357475, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA. dchi@uw.edu.
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2015 Oct 09; 15(1):121
Date
Oct-09-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Beverages
Biomarkers - analysis
Child
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Female
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Male
Sugars
Sweetening Agents
Abstract
Dental caries (tooth decay) is a significant public health problem in Alaska Native children. Dietary added sugars are considered one of the main risk factors. In this cross-sectional pilot study, we used a validated hair-based biomarker to measure added sugar intake in Alaska Native Yup'ik children ages 6-17 years (N?=?51). We hypothesized that added sugar intake would be positively associated with tooth decay.
A 66-item parent survey was administered, a hair sample was collected from each child, and a dental exam was conducted. Added sugar intake (grams/day) was measured from hair samples using a linear combination of carbon and nitrogen ratios. We used linear and log-linear regression models with robust standard errors to test our hypothesis that children with higher added sugar intake would have a higher proportion of carious tooth surfaces.
The mean proportion of carious tooth surfaces was 30.8 % (standard deviation: 23.2 %). Hair biomarker-based added sugar intake was associated with absolute (6.4 %; 95 % CI: 1.2 %, 11.6 %; P?=?.02) and relative increases in the proportion of carious tooth surfaces (24.2 %; 95 % CI: 10.6 %, 39.4 %; P?
PubMed ID
26452647 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between intake of artificially sweetened and sugar-sweetened beverages and preterm delivery: a large prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122026
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Sep;96(3):552-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Linda Englund-Ögge
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Margareta Haugen
Verena Sengpiel
Ali Khatibi
Ronny Myhre
Solveig Myking
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Marian Kacerovsky
Roy M Nilsen
Bo Jacobsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. linda.englund-ogge@vgregion.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Sep;96(3):552-9
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages - adverse effects
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Educational Status
Energy intake
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Norway
Obstetric Labor, Premature - etiology
Overweight - complications
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Single Person
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweetening Agents - adverse effects
Thinness - complications
Abstract
Artificially sweetened (AS) and sugar-sweetened (SS) beverages are commonly consumed during pregnancy. A recent Danish study reported that the daily intake of an AS beverage was associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery.
We examined the intake of AS and SS beverages in pregnant women to replicate the Danish study and observe whether AS intake is indeed associated with preterm delivery.
This was a prospective study of 60,761 pregnant women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Intakes of carbonated and noncarbonated AS and SS beverages and use of artificial sweeteners in hot drinks were assessed by a self-reported food-frequency questionnaire in midpregnancy. Preterm delivery was the primary outcome, and data were obtained from the Norwegian Medical Birth Registry.
Intakes of both AS and SS beverages increased with increasing BMI and energy intake and were higher in women with less education, in daily smokers, and in single women. A high intake of AS beverages was associated with preterm delivery; the adjusted OR for those drinking >1 serving/d was 1.11 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.24). Drinking >1 serving of SS beverages per day was also associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery (adjusted OR: 1.25; 95% CI: 1.08, 1.45). The trend tests were positive for both beverage types.
This study suggests that a high intake of both AS and SS beverages is associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery.
Notes
Cites: J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2005 Oct;18(4):241-716318974
Cites: Pediatrics. 2005 Dec;116(6):1391-40016322163
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2012 Sep;27(9):1127-3422539069
Cites: Ann Nutr Metab. 2006;50(5):450-6016877864
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2006 Oct;35(5):1146-5016926217
Cites: Nat Clin Pract Nephrol. 2006 Dec;2(12):700-717124527
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2007;(1):CD00594117253567
Cites: J Intern Med. 2007 May;261(5):412-717444880
Cites: Pediatr Res. 2007 May;61(5 Pt 2):68R-75R17413843
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2007 Sep;21(5):458-6417697076
Cites: Matern Child Nutr. 2008 Jan;4(1):14-2718171404
Cites: Matern Child Nutr. 2008 Jan;4(1):28-4318171405
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(3):319-2418307072
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(3):325-3018307073
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Aug;16(8):1894-90018535548
Cites: Behav Neurosci. 2009 Aug;123(4):772-8019634935
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2009 Nov;23(6):597-60819840297
Cites: Circulation. 2010 Mar 23;121(11):1356-6420308626
Cites: N Z Med J. 2010 Mar 19;123(1311):53-720360796
Cites: Physiol Behav. 2010 Apr 26;100(1):55-6220060008
Cites: Pediatrics. 2010 May;125(5):e1109-1420368320
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2010 Jun 3;130(11):1130-420531498
Cites: Reprod Sci. 2010 Jul;17(7):619-2820581349
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Sep;92(3):626-3320592133
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Nov;92(5):1277-8; author reply 1278-8020844066
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Nov;92(5):1120-3220844077
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2010 Dec;89(12):1532-721050147
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Jan;93(1):151-720980489
Cites: Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2011 Jan;96(1):F9-F1420876594
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2011 Mar;65(3):350-621179048
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2011 May;117(5):1071-721508745
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2011 Jun 23;364(25):2392-40421696306
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2000 May 18;342(20):1500-710816189
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2000 Jun;79(6):433-410857865
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2000 Jun;79(6):435-910857866
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Sep 15;154(6):514-2011549556
Cites: Circulation. 2002 Oct 15;106(16):2067-7212379575
Cites: Obes Res. 2002 Dec;10 Suppl 2:97S-104S12490658
Cites: J Soc Gynecol Investig. 2003 Sep;10(6):366-7112969780
Cites: Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2004 Sep-Oct;26(5):639-5015315813
Cites: Life Sci. 1998;63(5):337-499714421
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1999 Apr;180(4):903-1610203659
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2005;(2):CD00406915846695
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2005;(2):CD00407215846696
Cites: Nutr J. 2011;10:10321962086
Comment In: Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Jan;97(1):22423283681
Comment In: Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Jan;97(1):224-523405391
PubMed ID
22854404 View in PubMed
Less detail

Available energy from soft drinks: more than the sum of its parts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143754
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Dec;13(12):1997-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Anwar T Merchant
Avnish Tripathi
Farhan Pervaiz
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, 800 Sumter Street, Columbia, SC 29208, USA. anwar.merchant@post.harvard.edu
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Dec;13(12):1997-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Humans
Nutritive Value
Sweetening Agents - administration & dosage
Abstract
To evaluate the relationship between energy available from sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and total energy availability.
Ecological study using food availability data from 1976 to 2007 from the database of the Canadian Socio-Economic Information Management System. The average available total daily energy per capita (kJ (kcal)/d per capita) and percentage of energy from SSB (%E/d per capita) were calculated. A regression analysis was performed with average available total daily energy per capita (kJ (kcal)/d per capita) as the outcome and percentage of energy from SSB as the independent variable (%E/d per capita).
Canada 1976-2007.
None.
Between 1976 and 2007, total available energy increased on average by 669 kJ (160 kcal)/d per capita, and energy from SSB by 155 kJ (37 kcal)/d per capita. Total available energy increased by 434 kJ (104 kcal)/d per capita for a one unit increase in average percentage of energy from SSB.
Total available energy increased as the contribution of energy available from SSB increased. This increase was larger than that explained by energy availability from SSB alone. Reducing energy from soft drinks may contribute to larger reductions in total energy available for consumption.
PubMed ID
20444316 View in PubMed
Less detail

Between-meal eating, toothbrushing frequency and dental caries in 4-year-old children in the north of Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35297
Source
Int J Paediatr Dent. 1995 Jun;5(2):67-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
C. Stecksen-Blicks
A K Holm
Author Affiliation
Department of Pedodontics, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Int J Paediatr Dent. 1995 Jun;5(2):67-72
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Beverages
Child, Preschool
DMF Index
Dental Caries - etiology
Diet, Cariogenic
Feeding Behavior
Food
Humans
Ice Cream
Parents
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Sweetening Agents
Toothbrushing - utilization
Abstract
Two hundred and forty-nine 4-year-old children were examined for dental caries, and data were collected on frequency of toothbrushing, use of fluorides, and intake of nine different snack products. Dental caries experience of children who brushed once or twice daily with parental help was significantly lower than that of children who brushed irregularly. The intake of snacks was high. Buns and cakes, ice cream, and sweet beverages were consumed more often than sweets. Children who had high snack intakes and brushed irregularly had significantly higher caries experience than those with low snack intakes and regular toothbrushing. Therefore irregular toothbrushing was shown to potentiate the impact of frequent snacking.
PubMed ID
7547816 View in PubMed
Less detail

Beverage consumption patterns of Canadian adults aged 19 to 65 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121161
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Dec;15(12):2175-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Nooshin Nikpartow
Adrienne D Danyliw
Susan J Whiting
Hyun J Lim
Hassanali Vatanparast
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Dec;15(12):2175-84
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Animals
Beer
Beverages
Canada
Carbonated Beverages
Cluster analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Drinking
Educational Status
Energy intake
Exercise
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Milk
Sedentary lifestyle
Sex Factors
Sweetening Agents
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate the beverage intake patterns of Canadian adults and explore characteristics of participants in different beverage clusters.
Analyses of nationally representative data with cross-sectional complex stratified design.
Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 2.2 (2004).
A total of 14 277 participants aged 19-65 years, in whom dietary intake was assessed using a single 24 h recall, were included in the study. After determining total intake and the contribution of beverages to total energy intake among age/sex groups, cluster analysis (K-means method) was used to classify males and females into distinct clusters based on the dominant pattern of beverage intakes. To test differences across clusters, ?2 tests and 95 % confidence intervals of the mean intakes were used.
Six beverage clusters in women and seven beverage clusters in men were identified. 'Sugar-sweetened' beverage clusters - regular soft drinks and fruit drinks - as well as a 'beer' cluster, appeared for both men and women. No 'milk' cluster appeared among women. The mean consumption of the dominant beverage in each cluster was higher among men than women. The 'soft drink' cluster in men had the lowest proportion of the higher levels of education, and in women the highest proportion of inactivity, compared with other beverage clusters.
Patterns of beverage intake in Canadian women indicate high consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages particularly fruit drinks, low intake of milk and high intake of beer. These patterns in women have implications for poor bone health, risk of obesity and other morbidities.
PubMed ID
22931911 View in PubMed
Less detail

71 records – page 1 of 8.