Skip header and navigation

Refine By

50929 records – page 1 of 5093.

[1,4 billions crowns to 1 881 projects renew rehabilitation and habilitation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202185
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Apr 14;96(15):1823
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-14-1999
Author
G. Wallgrund
G. Grimby
Author Affiliation
Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Apr 14;96(15):1823
Date
Apr-14-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services - economics - trends
Humans
Rehabilitation - economics - methods - trends
Sweden
PubMed ID
10319646 View in PubMed
Less detail

[1,4 millions Swedes are on the donation registry. Still several thousands newly registered persons per month].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208386
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 May 28;94(22):2105-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-28-1997
Author
H. Gäbel
N. Rehnqvist
B. Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Transplantationskirurgiska kliniken, Huddinge sjukhus, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 May 28;94(22):2105-8
Date
May-28-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Public Opinion
Registries
Sweden
Tissue Donors
Tissue and Organ Procurement - statistics & numerical data
PubMed ID
9213668 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 1-month prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder according to DSM-IV, DSM-V, and ICD-10 among nondemented 75-year-olds in Gothenburg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124775
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;20(11):963-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Nilsson, J
Östling, S
Waern, M
Karlsson, B
SigstrÖm, R
Xinxin Guo
Ingmar Skoog
Author Affiliation
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;20(11):963-72
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Interview, Psychological
Life Style
Male
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Phobic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
To examine the 1-month prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental, Fifth Edition (DSM-V), and International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10), and the overlap between these criteria, in a population sample of 75-year-olds. We also aimed to examine comorbidity between GAD and other psychiatric diagnoses, such as depression.
During 2005-2006, a comprehensive semistructured psychiatric interview was conducted by trained nurses in a representative population sample of 75-year-olds without dementia in Gothenburg, Sweden (N = 777; 299 men and 478 women). All psychiatric diagnoses were made according to DSM-IV. GAD was also diagnosed according to ICD-10 and DSM-V.
The 1-month prevalence of GAD was 4.1% (N = 32) according to DSM-IV, 4.5% (N = 35) according to DSM-V, and 3.7% (N = 29) according to ICD-10. Only 46.9% of those with DSM-IV GAD fulfilled ICD-10 criteria, and only 51.7% and 44.8% of those with ICD-10 GAD fulfilled DSM-IV/V criteria. Instead, 84.4% and 74.3% of those with DSM-IV/V GAD and 89.7% of those with ICD-10 GAD had depression. Also other psychiatric diagnoses were common in those with ICD-10 and DSM-IV GAD. Only a small minority with GAD, irrespective of criteria, had no other comorbid psychiatric disorder. ICD-10 GAD was related to an increased mortality rate.
While GAD was common in 75-year-olds, DSM-IV/V and ICD-10 captured different individuals. Current definitions of GAD may comprise two different expressions of the disease. There was greater congruence between GAD in either classification system and depression than between DSM-IV/V GAD and ICD-10 GAD, emphasizing the close link between these entities.
PubMed ID
22549369 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 1% of the population accountable for 63% of all violent crime convictions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259131
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 Apr;49(4):559-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Falk, O
Wallinius, M
Lundström, S
Frisell, T
Anckarsäter, H
Kerekes, N
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 Apr;49(4):559-71
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aggression - psychology
Criminals - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Population-based studies on violent crime and background factors may provide an understanding of the relationships between susceptibility factors and crime. We aimed to determine the distribution of violent crime convictions in the Swedish population 1973-2004 and to identify criminal, academic, parental, and psychiatric risk factors for persistence in violent crime.
The nationwide multi-generation register was used with many other linked nationwide registers to select participants. All individuals born in 1958-1980 (2,393,765 individuals) were included. Persistent violent offenders (those with a lifetime history of three or more violent crime convictions) were compared with individuals having one or two such convictions, and to matched non-offenders. Independent variables were gender, age of first conviction for a violent crime, nonviolent crime convictions, and diagnoses for major mental disorders, personality disorders, and substance use disorders.
A total of 93,642 individuals (3.9%) had at least one violent conviction. The distribution of convictions was highly skewed; 24,342 persistent violent offenders (1.0% of the total population) accounted for 63.2% of all convictions. Persistence in violence was associated with male sex (OR 2.5), personality disorder (OR 2.3), violent crime conviction before age 19 (OR 2.0), drug-related offenses (OR 1.9), nonviolent criminality (OR 1.9), substance use disorder (OR 1.9), and major mental disorder (OR 1.3).
The majority of violent crimes are perpetrated by a small number of persistent violent offenders, typically males, characterized by early onset of violent criminality, substance abuse, personality disorders, and nonviolent criminality.
Notes
Cites: JAMA Psychiatry. 2013 May;70(5):465-7123467760
Cites: Behav Genet. 2012 Jan;42(1):3-1821761238
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2000 Oct;57(10):979-8611015816
Cites: Dev Psychopathol. 2001 Spring;13(2):355-7511393651
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 1989 Dec;57(6):710-82600241
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1992 Jun;49(6):476-831599373
Cites: Lancet. 1997 May 24;349(9064):1498-5049167458
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1997 Jun;154(6):840-59167513
Cites: Psychol Bull. 1998 Mar;123(2):123-429522681
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1998 May;55(5):393-4019596041
Cites: Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2005 Feb;59(1):25-915679536
Cites: Sex Abuse. 2005 Jul;17(3):269-9216121839
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2006 Jun;16(3):260-6616446293
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2006 Aug;163(8):1397-40316877653
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Dec 15;164(12):1199-20817032695
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Jun;42(6):477-8417450452
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 2008 Jan;69(1):12-2218312033
Cites: J Abnorm Psychol. 2008 May;117(2):396-40518489215
Cites: Int J Law Psychiatry. 2008 Aug-Sep;31(4):374-8318678408
Cites: BMC Psychiatry. 2008;8:9219032787
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 2009 Mar;70(3):362-919284931
Cites: PLoS Med. 2009 Aug;6(8):e100012019668362
Cites: Nord J Psychiatry. 2009;63(4):292-30019229735
Cites: Schizophr Bull. 2010 Jul;36(4):702-1218990713
Cites: Arch Sex Behav. 2010 Oct;39(5):1161-919888644
Cites: Psychol Med. 2011 Jan;41(1):97-10520334717
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;67(12):1325-621135334
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2011 Jul;31(5):872-8221550331
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(10):e2576822022445
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2000 May;57(5):494-50010807490
PubMed ID
24173408 View in PubMed
Less detail

1st European Congress on Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. Stockholm, Sweden. September 2--5, 1979.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62440
Source
JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 1979 Jul-Aug;3(4):289-316
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Source
JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 1979 Jul-Aug;3(4):289-316
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Congresses
Enteral Nutrition
Europe
Humans
Metabolism
Nutrition
Parenteral Nutrition
Sweden
PubMed ID
39184 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Med Welt. 1975 Dec 5;26(49):2239-40 contd
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-5-1975
Source
Med Welt. 1975 Dec 5;26(49):2239-40 contd
Date
Dec-5-1975
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Congresses
Coronary Disease - drug therapy
Humans
Isosorbide Dinitrate - therapeutic use
Nitrates - therapeutic use
Sweden
PubMed ID
1207466 View in PubMed
Less detail

[1st Symposium on Nitrates in Stockholm. Conclusion]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56131
Source
Med Welt. 1976 Jan 16;27(3):130-1 concl
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-16-1976

[1st Symposium on Nitrates in Stockholm. VI]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56139
Source
Med Welt. 1976 Jan 9;27(2):88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-9-1976

[1-year patient statistics in Kälarne with diagnosis and remission registration at the medical centre]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41895
Source
Lakartidningen. 1977 Aug 17;74(33):2759-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-17-1977

1-year retention and social function after buprenorphine-assisted relapse prevention treatment for heroin dependence in Sweden: a randomised, placebo-controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186500
Source
Lancet. 2003 Feb 22;361(9358):662-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-22-2003
Author
Johan Kakko
Kerstin Dybrandt Svanborg
Mary Jeanne Kreek
Markus Heilig
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry, Neurotec, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, S-141 86, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Lancet. 2003 Feb 22;361(9358):662-8
Date
Feb-22-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Buprenorphine - therapeutic use
Counseling
Female
Heroin Dependence - classification - drug therapy - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Narcotic Antagonists - therapeutic use
Psychotherapy, Group
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The partial opiate-receptor agonist buprenorphine has been suggested for treatment of heroin dependence, but there are few long-term and placebo-controlled studies of its effectiveness. We aimed to assess the 1-year efficacy of buprenorphine in combination with intensive psychosocial therapy for treatment of heroin dependence.
40 individuals aged older than 20 years, who met DSM-IV criteria for opiate dependence for at least 1 year, but did not fulfil Swedish legal criteria for methadone maintenance treatment were randomly allocated either to daily buprenorphine (fixed dose 16 mg sublingually for 12 months; supervised daily administration for a least 6 months, possible take-home doses thereafter) or a tapered 6 day regimen of buprenorphine, thereafter followed by placebo. All patients participated in cognitive-behavioural group therapy to prevent relapse, received weekly individual counselling sessions, and submitted thrice weekly supervised urine samples for analysis to detect illicit drug use. Our primary endpoint was 1-year retention in treatment and analysis was by intention to treat.
1-year retention in treatment was 75% and 0% in the buprenorphine and placebo groups, respectively (p=0.0001; risk ratio 58.7 [95% CI 7.4-467.4]). Urine screens were about 75% negative for illicit opiates, central stimulants, cannabinoids, and benzodiazepines in the patients remaining in treatment.
The combination of buprenorphine and intensive psychosocial treatment is safe and highly efficacious, and should be added to the treatment options available for individuals who are dependent on heroin.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2003 May 31;361(9372):1907; author reply 1907-812788596
Comment In: Lancet. 2003 Feb 22;361(9358):634-512606172
Comment In: Lancet. 2003 May 31;361(9372):1906-7; author reply 1907-812788595
PubMed ID
12606177 View in PubMed
Less detail

50929 records – page 1 of 5093.