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5-year outcome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117830
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2013 Jan 29;61(4):413-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-29-2013
Author
Stefan Toggweiler
Karin H Humphries
May Lee
Ronald K Binder
Robert R Moss
Melanie Freeman
Jian Ye
Anson Cheung
David A Wood
John G Webb
Author Affiliation
St. Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2013 Jan 29;61(4):413-9
Date
Jan-29-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Valve - physiopathology - surgery - ultrasonography
Aortic Valve Stenosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - surgery
Canada - epidemiology
Equipment Failure Analysis - statistics & numerical data
Female
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - methods - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Postoperative Period
Prognosis
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure - etiology
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Rate
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the 5-year outcome following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).
Little is known about long-term outcomes following TAVI.
The 5-year outcomes following successful TAVI with a balloon-expandable valve were evaluated in 88 patients. Patients who died within 30 days after TAVI were excluded.
Mean aortic valve gradient decreased from 46 ± 18 mm Hg to 10 ± 4.5 mm Hg after TAVI and 11.8 ± 5.7 mm Hg at 5 years (p for post-TAVI trend = 0.06). Mean aortic valve area increased from 0.62 ± 0.17 cm(2) to 1.67 ± 0.41 cm(2) after TAVI and 1.40 ± 0.25 cm(2) at 5 years (p for post-TAVI trend
PubMed ID
23265333 View in PubMed
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Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scoring system in acute myocardial infarction: a prospective validation study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54776
Source
Crit Care Med. 1995 May;23(5):854-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
U. Ludwigs
J. Hulting
Author Affiliation
Medical Intensive Care Unit, Department of Medicine, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Crit Care Med. 1995 May;23(5):854-9
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
APACHE
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Comparative Study
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - mortality
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study the usefulness of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scoring system for prognostication of inhospital mortality in acute myocardial infarction. DESIGN: A prospective validation study. SETTING: A medical intensive care unit (ICU) at a university hospital. PATIENTS: Over a 3-yr period, 2,007 admissions of 1,714 patients with acute myocardial infarction were studied. In readmissions to the medical ICU during the same hospital stay, only the first admission was studied. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Mean age of the patients was 72 +/- 10 yrs. The medical ICU mortality rate was 13% and total hospital mortality rate was 16%. Mean APACHE II score was 11.6 +/- 6.5. There was a close correlation between observed and predicted mortality rates in classes of patients with various APACHE II scores. Observed mortality in patients with scores of 20 to 24 was higher than the predicted mortality (p
PubMed ID
7736743 View in PubMed
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Adult children's socioeconomic resources and mothers' survival after a breast cancer diagnosis: a Swedish population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287819
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Mar 30;7(3):e014968
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-30-2017
Author
Hannah L Brooke
Gunilla Ringbäck Weitoft
Mats Talbäck
Maria Feychting
Rickard Ljung
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Mar 30;7(3):e014968
Date
Mar-30-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Children - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - mortality
Cancer Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Income
Middle Aged
Mothers - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Socioeconomic inequalities in survival after breast cancer persist worldwide. We aim to determine whether adult offspring's socioeconomic resources contribute to inequalities in mothers' survival after breast cancer.
14 231 women, aged 65-79 years, with a child aged =30 years and a first primary diagnosis of breast cancer in the National Cancer Register between 2001 and 2010 were followed until death, 10 years after diagnosis, or end of study (December 2015). Relative survival proportions and excess mortality within 10 years of diagnosis by strata of offspring's education level and disposable income were estimated using flexible parametric models accounting for measures of mothers' socioeconomic position and expected mortality in the general population.
4292 women died during 102 236 person-years of follow-up. Crude 10-year relative survival proportions for mothers of children with >14, 12-14 and 14 years of education, mothers of children with
Notes
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PubMed ID
28363931 View in PubMed
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Adult life after childhood cancer in Scandinavia: diabetes mellitus following treatment for cancer in childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105033
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2014 Apr;50(6):1169-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Anna Sällfors Holmqvist
Jørgen H Olsen
Klaus Kaae Andersen
Sofie de Fine Licht
Lars Hjorth
Stanislaw Garwicz
Christian Moëll
Harald Anderson
Finn Wesenberg
Laufey Tryggvadottir
Nea Malila
John D Boice
Henrik Hasle
Jeanette Falck Winther
Author Affiliation
Paediatric Oncology and Haematology, Skåne University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: anna.sallfors-holmqvist@med.lu.se.
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2014 Apr;50(6):1169-75
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasms - classification - epidemiology - therapy
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
An increased risk for diabetes mellitus (DM) adds significantly to the burden of late complications in childhood cancer survivors. Complications of DM may be prevented by using appropriate screening. It is, therefore, important to better characterise the reported increased risk for DM in a large population-based setting.
From the national cancer registries of the five Nordic countries, a cohort of 32,903 1-year survivors of cancer diagnosed before the age of 20 between start of cancer registration in the 1940s and 1950s through 2008 was identified; 212,393 comparison subjects of the same age, gender and country were selected from national population registers. Study subjects were linked to the national hospital registers. Absolute excess risks (AERs) and standardised hospitalisation rate ratios (SHRRs) were calculated.
DM was diagnosed in 496 childhood cancer survivors, yielding an overall SHRR of 1.6 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.5-1.8) and an AER of 43 per 100,000 person-years, increasing from approximately 20 extra cases of DM in ages 0-19 to more than 100 extra cases per 100,000 person-years in ages > or =50. The relative risks for DM were significantly increased after Wilms' tumour (SHRR, 2.9), leukaemia (2.0), CNS neoplasms (1.8), germ-cell neoplasms (1.7), malignant bone tumours (1.7) and Hodgkin's lymphoma (1.6). The risk for DM type 2 was slightly higher than that for type 1.
Childhood cancer survivors are at increased risk for DM, with absolute risks increasing throughout life. These findings underscore the need for preventive interventions and prolonged follow-up of childhood cancer survivors.
PubMed ID
24507548 View in PubMed
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Adverse Obstetric Outcomes Among Early-Onset Cancer Survivors in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269216
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2015 Oct;126(4):803-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Johanna Melin
Sirpa Heinävaara
Nea Malila
Aila Tiitinen
Mika Gissler
Laura Madanat-Harjuoja
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2015 Oct;126(4):803-10
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant
Labor, Induced - statistics & numerical data
Neoplasms
Pregnancy
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate risk of adverse obstetric outcomes and operative deliveries in female cancer survivors (diagnosed younger than 35 years of age) compared with female siblings of survivors.
Nationwide cancer and birth registries were merged to identify 1,800 first postdiagnosis deliveries of female cancer survivors and 7,137 first deliveries of female siblings between January 1987 and December 2013. Multiple unconditional logistic regression models were used to estimate the risk for adverse obstetric outcomes and operative deliveries adjusting for maternal age, year of delivery, gestational age, and smoking.
We found a significantly elevated risk for induction of labor, 19.1% in survivors and 15.6% in siblings (odds ratio [OR] 1.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.35) and cesarean delivery, 23.6% in survivors and 18.6% in siblings (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.01-1.31) among cancer survivors compared with female siblings. The risks of instrumental vaginal delivery, malpresentation, placental pathologies, and postpartum hemorrhage were not, however, elevated among cancer survivors. The highest risks of adverse obstetric outcomes were seen among women treated in their childhood (aged 0-14 years).
Cancer survivors have a small but statistically increased risk for induction of labor and cesarean delivery compared with siblings without a history of cancer. Our findings indicate that pregnancies in cancer survivors are typically uncomplicated and cancer survivors should not be discouraged to have children after their cancer is cured.
II.
PubMed ID
26348187 View in PubMed
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Aging of the population may not lead to an increase in the numbers of acute coronary events: a community surveillance study and modelled forecast of the future.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114624
Source
Heart. 2013 Jul;99(13):954-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Veikko Salomaa
Aki S Havulinna
Heli Koukkunen
Päivi Kärjä-Koskenkari
Arto Pietilä
Juha Mustonen
Matti Ketonen
Aapo Lehtonen
Pirjo Immonen-Räihä
Seppo Lehto
Juhani Airaksinen
Y Antero Kesäniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, THL-National Institute for Health and Welfare, PO Box 30, Helsinki FI-00271, Finland. veikko.salomaa@thl.fi
Source
Heart. 2013 Jul;99(13):954-9
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - epidemiology - mortality
Age Factors
Age of Onset
Aged
Aging
Bayes Theorem
Comorbidity
Computer simulation
Epidemiology - trends
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Forecasting
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Markov Chains
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Monte Carlo Method
Registries
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
To examine the incidence, mortality and case fatality of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in Finland during 1993-2007 and to create forecasts of the absolute numbers of ACS cases in the future, taking into account the aging of the population.
Community surveillance study and modelled forecasts of the future.
Two sets of population-based coronary event register data from Finland (FINAMI and the National Cardiovascular Disease Register (CVDR)). Bayesian age-period-cohort (APC) modelling.
24 905 observed ACS events in the FINAMI register and 364 137 in CVDR.
Observed trends of ACS events during 1993-2007, forecasted numbers of ACS cases, and the prevalence of ACS survivors until the year 2050.
In the FINAMI register, the average annual declines in age-standardised incidence of ACS were 1.6% (p
PubMed ID
23598542 View in PubMed
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Are there sex differences in the work ability of cancer survivors? Norwegian experiences from the NOCWO study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145600
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2011 Mar;19(3):323-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Sævar Berg Gudbergsson
Sophie D Fosså
Alv A Dahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Cancer Research, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway. bergg@ulrik.uio.no
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2011 Mar;19(3):323-31
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - complications - physiopathology
Case-Control Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Prostatic Neoplasms - complications - physiopathology
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Testicular Neoplasms - complications - physiopathology
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
This study investigated gender differences concerning work ability in working cancer survivors (CSs) and compared them to those of matched population-based controls.
A mailed questionnaire was completed by 446 Norwegian CSs (226 breast cancer, 166 testicular and 54 prostate cancer) with good prognosis 2-6 years after primary treatment and 588 controls (319 females and 269 males). Overall current work ability (OCWA) was the primary outcome measure, and ten indices of the physical, mental and social skill aspects of work ability (WA) were also studied.
The mean OCWA score was higher amongst male CSs compared to females (p?=?0.04). The mean OCWA score was similar in male CSs and controls (p? =?0.17), whilst female CSs had significantly lower mean OCWA score than controls (p?
PubMed ID
20135150 View in PubMed
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The association between nocturnal hot flashes and sleep in breast cancer survivors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179947
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2004 Jun;27(6):513-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Josée Savard
Judith R Davidson
Hans Ivers
Catherine Quesnel
Dominique Rioux
Véronique Dupéré
Mélissa Lasnier
Sébastien Simard
Charles M Morin
Author Affiliation
Laval University Cancer Research Center and School of Psychology, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2004 Jun;27(6):513-22
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Circadian Rhythm
Comorbidity
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Hot Flashes - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Statistics as Topic
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study examined the relationship between objectively measured nocturnal hot flashes and objectively measured sleep in breast cancer survivors with insomnia. Twenty-four women who had completed treatment for non-metastatic breast cancer participated. All were enrolled in a study of cognitive-behavioral treatment for chronic insomnia. Nocturnal hot flashes and sleep were measured by skin conductance and polysomnography, respectively. The 10-minute periods around hot flashes were found to have significantly more wake time, and more stage changes to lighter sleep, than other 10-minute periods during the night. Nights with hot flashes had a significantly higher percentage of wake time, a lower percentage of Stage 2 sleep, and a longer REM latency compared to nights without hot flashes. Overall, hot flashes were found to be associated with less efficient, more disrupted sleep. Nocturnal hot flashes, or their underlying mechanisms, should be considered as potential contributors to sleep disruption in women with breast cancer who report poor sleep.
PubMed ID
15165649 View in PubMed
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Association of Donor Age and Sex With Survival of Patients Receiving Transfusions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285053
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2017 Jun 01;177(6):854-860
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-01-2017
Author
Gustaf Edgren
Henrik Ullum
Klaus Rostgaard
Christian Erikstrup
Ulrik Sartipy
Martin J Holzmann
Olof Nyrén
Henrik Hjalgrim
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2017 Jun 01;177(6):854-860
Date
Jun-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood Donors - statistics & numerical data
Blood Transfusion - mortality
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Following animal model data indicating the possible rejuvenating effects of blood from young donors, there have been at least 2 observational studies conducted with humans that have investigated whether donor age affects patient outcomes. Results, however, have been conflicting.
To study the association of donor age and sex with survival of patients receiving transfusions.
A retrospective cohort study based on the Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions database, with nationwide data, was conducted for all patients from Sweden and Denmark who received at least 1 red blood cell transfusion of autologous blood or blood from unknown donors between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2012. Patients were followed up from the first transfusion until death, emigration, or end of follow-up. Data analysis was performed from September 15 to November 15, 2016.
The number of transfusions from blood donors of different age and sex. Exposure was treated time dependently throughout follow-up.
Hazard ratios (HRs) for death and adjusted cumulative mortality differences, both estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression.
Results of a crude analysis including 968?264 transfusion recipients (550?257 women and 418?007 men; median age at first transfusion, 73.0 years [interquartile range, 59.8-82.4 years]) showed a U-shaped association between age of the blood donor and recipient mortality, with a nadir in recipients for the most common donor age group (40-49 years) and significant and increasing HRs among recipients of blood from donors of successively more extreme age groups (
Notes
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PubMed ID
28437543 View in PubMed
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Association of preterm birth with long-term survival, reproduction, and next-generation preterm birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87307
Source
JAMA. 2008 Mar 26;299(12):1429-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-26-2008
Author
Swamy Geeta K
Ostbye Truls
Skjaerven Rolv
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA. swamy002@mc.duke.edu
Source
JAMA. 2008 Mar 26;299(12):1429-36
Date
Mar-26-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Educational Status
Female
Fertility
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Morbidity
Mortality
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy Rate
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Registries
Risk
Socioeconomic Factors
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
CONTEXT: Preterm birth is a major cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Less is known about long-term health among persons born preterm. OBJECTIVE: To determine the long-term effects of preterm birth on survival, reproduction, and next-generation preterm birth. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Population-based, observational, longitudinal study using registry data from 1,167,506 singleton births in the Medical Birth Registry of Norway in 1967-1988. The cohort was followed up through 2002 for survival. The cohort was truncated to births from 1967-1976 for assessment of educational achievement and reproductive outcomes through 2004. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: In relation to sex and gestational age at birth, absolute mortality, risk of fetal, infant, child, and adolescent mortality, and incidence and risk of reproduction and next-generation preterm birth. Singleton term (37-42 weeks) fetal deaths and live births, stratified by sex, served as the reference group for all analyses. RESULTS: The percentage who were born preterm was higher among boys (5.6%) than among girls (4.7%). Preterm participants had an increased risk of mortality throughout childhood. For boys born at 22 to 27 weeks, mortality rates were 1.33% and 1.01% for early and late childhood death, with relative risks (RRs) of 5.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-14.2) and 7.0 (95% CI, 2.3-22.0), respectively. The mortality rate for girls born at 22 to 27 weeks was 1.71% for early childhood death, with an RR of 9.7 (95% CI, 4.0-23.7); there were no late childhood deaths. For 28 to 32 weeks, the early and late childhood mortality rates among boys were 0.73% and 0.37%, with RRs of 2.5 (95% CI, 1.6-3.7) and 2.3 (95% CI, 1.3-4.1), respectively. Girls born at 28 to 32 weeks did not have a significantly increased risk of childhood mortality. Reproduction was diminished for index participants born preterm. For men and women born at 22 to 27 weeks, absolute reproduction was 29.3[corrected]% and 51.9[corrected]%, with RRs of 0.59 [corrected] (95% CI, 0.45[corrected]-0.79[corrected]) and 0.78 [corrected] (95% CI, 0.65[corrected]-0.93[corrected]), respectively. For 28 to 32 weeks, absolute reproduction was 43.1[corrected]% and 63.6[corrected]% for men and women, with RRs of 0.81[corrected] (95% CI, 0.77[corrected]-0.86[corrected]) and 0.89 [corrected] (95% CI, 0.86 [corrected]-0.93 [corrected]), respectively. Preterm women but not men were at increased risk of having preterm offspring. CONCLUSION: In persons born in Norway in 1967-1988, preterm birth was associated with diminished long-term survival and reproduction.
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 2008 Jul 9;300(2):167; author reply 167-818612111
Comment In: JAMA. 2008 Mar 26;299(12):1477-818364492
Erratum In: JAMA. 2008 Jul 9;300(2):170-1
PubMed ID
18364485 View in PubMed
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169 records – page 1 of 17.