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[47-percent 6-months-long survival for intensive care patients over 80].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198302
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Apr 26;97(17):2066-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-26-2000
Author
N. Lindqvist
O. Lindqvist
Author Affiliation
Universitetssjukhuset i Lund. ninnilindqvist@iname.com
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Apr 26;97(17):2066-70
Date
Apr-26-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ethics, Medical
Female
Humans
Intensive Care - economics
Length of Stay
Male
Quality of Life
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Survivors - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
All 112 patients aged 80 and above treated at the intensive care unit at the University Hospital in Lund, Sweden 1994-1995 were followed-up retrospectively in terms of six-month survival (SMS) and for survivors in terms of quality of life. Overall SMS was the same for both men and women--47%. Patients with the poorest SMS were those aged 90 and above with only one patient out of eleven surviving six months. Patients admitted for severe heart failure also showed a very poor outcome with SMS 27%. Patients were grouped in terms of living conditions prior to admission to the ICU, and a significant difference in six-month survival was noted between those living in their own homes (53%) prior to admission compared to those coming from a nursing home (25%). Patients surviving six months were interviewed by telephone regarding their living situation in March 1997. More than 50% of survivors were living in their own homes with external help no more than once a day. The average APACHE II score was 14.9 +/- 8.2. The average score for patients surviving six months was 13.4 +/- 5.9 and for those not surviving six months 16.8 +/- 5.1. No significant statistical difference in APACHE II scores between these two groups was shown.
PubMed ID
10850034 View in PubMed
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2004 Tsunami: long-term psychological consequences for Swiss tourists in the area at the time of the disaster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151473
Source
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2009 May;43(5):420-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Bernd Kraemer
Lutz Wittmann
Josef Jenewein
Ulrich Schnyder
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Zurich, Culmannstrasse 8, Zurich CH-8091, Switzerland. bernd.kraemer@usz.ch
Source
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2009 May;43(5):420-5
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anxiety - diagnosis
Depression - diagnosis
Disasters
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis
Survivors - psychology
Switzerland - ethnology
Tidal Waves
Abstract
Most of the data on psychological outcome and the mental health treatment available following natural disasters originate from the indigenous population of the region destroyed. Examining tourists returning from the area affected by the 2004 tsunami presents an opportunity of studying the impact of natural disasters on psychological outcome and mental health treatment in their countries of origin. The aim of the present study was to extend the current knowledge on psychiatric morbidity and potential positive outcomes, as well as subsequent mental health treatment following a natural disaster, based on the results from a sample of home-coming Swiss tourists.
Tourists who had been potentially affected by the 2004 tsunami were assessed using the Post-traumatic Diagnostic Scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Post-traumatic Growth Inventory. Outcome variables were related to the degree of tsunami exposure. In addition, mental health treatment before and after the tsunami was assessed.
Of the 342 respondents, 55 (16.8%) fulfilled the criteria of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Evidence of anxiety or depressive disorder was found in 17.8% and 8.0%, respectively. The tsunami victims who had been directly affected showed significantly more symptoms of anxiety, depression and PTSD, as well as post-traumatic personal growth, than tourists who were indirectly affected or unaffected. A total of 12.3% of untreated respondents fulfilled the criteria for PTSD and 38% of respondents who had received psychiatric treatment were still fulfilling PTSD criteria 2(1/2) years after the tsunami.
A marked percentage of respondents reported symptoms of PTSD but they remained untreated or were treated insufficiently. We recommend that tourists returning from regions affected by natural disasters be informed about PTSD and that careful screening be given to those found to be at risk of PTSD. An open-door policy of mental health services is particularly needed for tourists returning home who have been affected by large-scale disasters.
PubMed ID
19373702 View in PubMed
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Acute disaster exposure and mental health complaints of Norwegian tsunami survivors six months post disaster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91783
Source
Psychiatry. 2008;71(3):266-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Heir Trond
Weisaeth Lars
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Center for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Ullevål University Hospital, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. trond.heir@medisin.uio.no
Source
Psychiatry. 2008;71(3):266-76
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology - psychology
Bereavement
Dangerous Behavior
Disasters - statistics & numerical data
Family Relations
Female
Friends
Helping Behavior
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - epidemiology
Survivors - psychology
Abstract
The objective was to investigate the relationship between possible disaster stressors and subsequent health problems among tourists experiencing the 2004 South-East Asia tsunami. A cross-sectional study was performed as a postal survey concerning the experiences of the disaster exposure in retrospect and the presence of psychological symptoms (GHQ-28) in Norwegian tsunami victims 6 months post disaster. The strongest predictors of health complaints were danger of death, witness impressions, and bereavements. Aggravated outcomes were also seen in those who helped others in the acute phase or had sole responsibility for children when the tsunami struck. Having a family member or close friend who was injured was reversely associated with health problems. Women reported more psychological distress than men, but the difference disappeared with increasing degree of danger exposure. Dose-response relationships to psychological distress were found for single exposure factors as well as for the cumulative effects of being exposed to several exposure variables.
PubMed ID
18834277 View in PubMed
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Acute stress disorder as a predictor of post-traumatic stress disorder in physical assault victims.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180143
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2004 Jun;19(6):709-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Ask Elklit
Ole Brink
Author Affiliation
Institute of Psychology, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2004 Jun;19(6):709-26
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Stress Disorders, Traumatic, Acute - complications - epidemiology
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Survivors - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The authors' objective was to examine the ability of acute stress disorder (ASD) and other trauma-related factors in a group of physical assault victims in predicting post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) 6 months later. Subjects included 214 victims of violence who completed a questionnaire 1 to 2 weeks after the assault, with 128 participating in the follow-up. Measures included the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire, the Trauma Symptom Checklist, and the Crisis Support Scale. Twenty-two percent met the full PTSD diagnosis and 22% a subclinical PTSD diagnosis. Previous lifetime shock due to a traumatic event happening to someone close, threats during the assault, and dissociation explained 56% of PTSD variance. Inability to express feelings, hypervigilance, impairment, and hopelessness explained another 15% of PTSD variance. The dissociative, the reexperiencing, the avoidant, and the arousal criteria of the ASD diagnosis correctly classified 79% of the subsequent PTSD cases.
PubMed ID
15140320 View in PubMed
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Addressing oncofertility needs: views of female cancer patients in fertility preservation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124552
Source
J Psychosoc Oncol. 2012;30(3):331-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Samantha Yee
Kaajal Abrol
Melanie McDonald
Madeline Tonelli
Kimberly E Liu
Author Affiliation
Centre for Fertility and Reproductive Health, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. syee@mtsinai.on.ca
Source
J Psychosoc Oncol. 2012;30(3):331-46
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Female
Fertility Preservation
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Neoplasms - therapy
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Survivors - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
A total of 41 questionnaires were returned from 64 respondents who consented to receive a questionnaire through the mail. Almost all valued the opportunity to receive consultation to address their fertility concerns and discuss fertility preservation options. Psychological stress, time pressure, and costs were identified as main factors affecting respondents' decision to proceed with in-vitro fertilization to cryopreserve oocytes or embryos. About one third indicated that the discussion of fertility matters was initiated by themselves, their friends, and families rather than their health care providers. The findings have identified several major barriers encountered by female cancer patients when seeking fertility preservation services.
PubMed ID
22571247 View in PubMed
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Adolescent and young adult cancer survivors' perceptions of participating in a survey - Ethical and methodological considerations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299702
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2019 Apr; 39:55-61
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Maria Olsson
Gunnar Steineck
Karin Enskär
Ulrica Wilderäng
Marianne Jarfelt
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Sciences, Department of Paediatrics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, S-416 85, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: maria.a.olsson@vgregion.se.
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2019 Apr; 39:55-61
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cancer Survivors - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Patient Participation - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to understand patient-reported perception of participation in a population-based web-survey focusing on sensitive issues for adolescent and young adult cancer survivors.
A population-based web survey for adolescent and young adult cancer survivors including a matched control group. Adolescent and young adult cancer survivors from the population-based Swedish National Cancer Registry from four of the six register holders at Regional Cancer Centers in Sweden. Controls were randomly identified from the Swedish National Population registry, from the same register holders.
Of 729 eligible participants, 540 completed the survey i.e. 74% participation rate. The study population included 285 adolescent and young adult cancer survivors and 255 matched controls. None of the participants answered that the survey had a very negative impact on them and a minority of 43 (7.9%) of the 540 responded that they were mildly negatively affected by their participation in the study. There was a no significant difference between patients and controls regarding the negative effect of the participation (p?=?0.29). Positive experiences of participating in the study were widely expressed and most participants (95%) found the study valuable.
These findings suggest that the benefits clearly outweigh the risks when adolescent and young adult cancer survivors participate in surveys including sensitive and trauma-related aspects, given that the study design is ethically sound and participants are approached carefully. We also present a modified ethical protocol for epidemiological surveys on adolescents and young adult cancer survivors.
PubMed ID
30850139 View in PubMed
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Adult Victimization in Female Survivors of Childhood Violence and Abuse: The Contribution of Multiple Types of Violence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297548
Source
Violence Against Women. 2017 11; 23(13):1601-1619
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-2017
Author
Helene Flood Aakvaag
Siri Thoresen
Tore Wentzel-Larsen
Grete Dyb
Author Affiliation
1 Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Violence Against Women. 2017 11; 23(13):1601-1619
Date
11-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Child Abuse - psychology
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Norway
Survivors - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a well-established risk factor for adult victimization in women, but little is known about the importance of relationship to perpetrator and exposure to other violence types. This study interviewed 2,437 Norwegian women (response rate = 45.0%) about their experiences with violence. Logistic regression analyses were employed to estimate associations of multiple categories of childhood violence with adult victimization. Women exposed to CSA often experienced other childhood violence, and the total burden of violence was associated with adult rape and intimate partner violence (IPV). Researchers and clinicians need to take into account the full spectrum of violence exposure.
PubMed ID
27580984 View in PubMed
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Albumin and depression in elderly stroke survivors: An observational cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274259
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2015 Dec 15;230(2):658-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2015
Author
Michaela C Pascoe
Ingmar Skoog
Christian Blomstrand
Thomas Linden
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2015 Dec 15;230(2):658-63
Date
Dec-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Albumins - analysis
Cohort Studies
Depression - blood - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Stroke - blood - psychology
Survivors - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Post-stroke depression affects approximately one third of stroke survivors. In non-stroke affected populations, depressive symptomatology is associated with hypoalbuminemia. This is also common among stroke survivors and associated with poor outcome and increased mortality. The role of stroke-associated hypoalbuminemia in post-stroke depression is not clear. We aimed to explore the relationship between serum albumin and post-stroke depression, as measured 20 months post-stroke.
Observational cohort study of elderly Swedish patients drawn from the 'Gothenburg 70+ Stroke Study' (n=149) and assessed at 20 months after stroke onset. Serum albumin was drawn from venous blood and analysed with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Depressive symptomatology was assessed using the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and functional impairment was assessed using the Barthel Index.
Analysis of covariance analysis showed that serum albumin levels were associated with depressive symptoms at 20 months after stroke. Multivariate analysis of covariance showed that disability scores at 3 days were associated with depressive symptoms at 20 months after stroke and after accounting for the age covariate. Stroke survivors were not clinically deficient in serum albumin.
Low serum albumin appears to be associated with depressive symptoms in elderly individuals long term post-stroke.
PubMed ID
26520562 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption in the aftermath of a natural disaster: a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274815
Source
Public Health. 2016 Mar;132:33-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
A. Nordløkken
H. Pape
T. Heir
Source
Public Health. 2016 Mar;132:33-9
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Asia, Southeastern
Disasters
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Survivors - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Tsunamis
Abstract
In this study, we examined changes in alcohol consumption in the aftermath of a natural disaster, as well as possible predictors of both increased and decreased drinking.
Observational longitudinal study.
Repatriated Norwegian adults who resided in areas affected by the 2004 Southeast Asia tsunami completed a questionnaire at 6 and 24 months postdisaster (N = 649).
Weekly alcohol consumption and frequency of intoxication did not change significantly from 6 to 24 months postdisaster at the population level: 18.3% (n = 116) increased their alcohol consumption while 21.1% (n = 125) showed a reduction. Increased drinking was not predicted by severity of disaster exposure, post-traumatic stress, or measures of psychological functioning. Reduced alcohol consumption was predicted by younger age and social withdrawal, but not by any of the other study variables.
Our findings indicate that the tsunami experience had only minor effects on alcohol consumption, in contrast to some studies suggesting a relationship between trauma exposure and increased alcohol consumption.
PubMed ID
26715315 View in PubMed
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372 records – page 1 of 38.