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969 records – page 1 of 97.

5-year outcome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117830
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2013 Jan 29;61(4):413-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-29-2013
Author
Stefan Toggweiler
Karin H Humphries
May Lee
Ronald K Binder
Robert R Moss
Melanie Freeman
Jian Ye
Anson Cheung
David A Wood
John G Webb
Author Affiliation
St. Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2013 Jan 29;61(4):413-9
Date
Jan-29-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Valve - physiopathology - surgery - ultrasonography
Aortic Valve Stenosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - surgery
Canada - epidemiology
Equipment Failure Analysis - statistics & numerical data
Female
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - methods - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Postoperative Period
Prognosis
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure - etiology
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Rate
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the 5-year outcome following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).
Little is known about long-term outcomes following TAVI.
The 5-year outcomes following successful TAVI with a balloon-expandable valve were evaluated in 88 patients. Patients who died within 30 days after TAVI were excluded.
Mean aortic valve gradient decreased from 46 ± 18 mm Hg to 10 ± 4.5 mm Hg after TAVI and 11.8 ± 5.7 mm Hg at 5 years (p for post-TAVI trend = 0.06). Mean aortic valve area increased from 0.62 ± 0.17 cm(2) to 1.67 ± 0.41 cm(2) after TAVI and 1.40 ± 0.25 cm(2) at 5 years (p for post-TAVI trend
PubMed ID
23265333 View in PubMed
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A 10-year follow up of reproductive function in women treated for childhood cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113054
Source
Reprod Biomed Online. 2013 Aug;27(2):192-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
S N Nielsen
A N Andersen
K T Schmidt
C. Rechnitzer
K. Schmiegelow
J G Bentzen
E C Larsen
Author Affiliation
The Fertility Clinic, The Juliane Marie Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Reprod Biomed Online. 2013 Aug;27(2):192-200
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - blood - chemically induced - etiology - pathology
Adult
Anti-Mullerian Hormone - blood
Antineoplastic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infertility, Female - chemically induced - complications - etiology - pathology
Live Birth
Menstruation Disturbances - chemically induced - complications - etiology - pathology
Neoplasms - complications - drug therapy - radiotherapy
Ovary - drug effects - pathology - radiation effects
Pregnancy
Primary Ovarian Insufficiency - chemically induced - complications - etiology - pathology
Remission Induction
Risk
Survivors
Young Adult
Abstract
Previously, this study group found that female childhood cancer survivors could be at risk of early cessation of fertility. The aim of the present study was to evaluate reproductive function in the same group of survivors 10 years after the initial study. Of the original cohort of 100, 71 were re-examined. Thirty-six survivors reported regular menstrual cycles. When they were compared with 210 controls, they differed significantly in antral follicle count (AFC) (median 15 versus 18, P=0.047) but not in anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) (median 13.0 versus 17.8 pmol/l). Survivors cured with minimal gonadotoxic treatment had significantly higher AMH and AFC compared with survivors cured with either potentially gonadotoxic treatment or treatment including alkylating chemotherapy and ovarian irradiation (20.0, 5.8 and
PubMed ID
23768622 View in PubMed
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[47-percent 6-months-long survival for intensive care patients over 80].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198302
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Apr 26;97(17):2066-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-26-2000
Author
N. Lindqvist
O. Lindqvist
Author Affiliation
Universitetssjukhuset i Lund. ninnilindqvist@iname.com
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Apr 26;97(17):2066-70
Date
Apr-26-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ethics, Medical
Female
Humans
Intensive Care - economics
Length of Stay
Male
Quality of Life
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Survivors - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
All 112 patients aged 80 and above treated at the intensive care unit at the University Hospital in Lund, Sweden 1994-1995 were followed-up retrospectively in terms of six-month survival (SMS) and for survivors in terms of quality of life. Overall SMS was the same for both men and women--47%. Patients with the poorest SMS were those aged 90 and above with only one patient out of eleven surviving six months. Patients admitted for severe heart failure also showed a very poor outcome with SMS 27%. Patients were grouped in terms of living conditions prior to admission to the ICU, and a significant difference in six-month survival was noted between those living in their own homes (53%) prior to admission compared to those coming from a nursing home (25%). Patients surviving six months were interviewed by telephone regarding their living situation in March 1997. More than 50% of survivors were living in their own homes with external help no more than once a day. The average APACHE II score was 14.9 +/- 8.2. The average score for patients surviving six months was 13.4 +/- 5.9 and for those not surviving six months 16.8 +/- 5.1. No significant statistical difference in APACHE II scores between these two groups was shown.
PubMed ID
10850034 View in PubMed
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2004 Tsunami: long-term psychological consequences for Swiss tourists in the area at the time of the disaster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151473
Source
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2009 May;43(5):420-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Bernd Kraemer
Lutz Wittmann
Josef Jenewein
Ulrich Schnyder
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Zurich, Culmannstrasse 8, Zurich CH-8091, Switzerland. bernd.kraemer@usz.ch
Source
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2009 May;43(5):420-5
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anxiety - diagnosis
Depression - diagnosis
Disasters
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis
Survivors - psychology
Switzerland - ethnology
Tidal Waves
Abstract
Most of the data on psychological outcome and the mental health treatment available following natural disasters originate from the indigenous population of the region destroyed. Examining tourists returning from the area affected by the 2004 tsunami presents an opportunity of studying the impact of natural disasters on psychological outcome and mental health treatment in their countries of origin. The aim of the present study was to extend the current knowledge on psychiatric morbidity and potential positive outcomes, as well as subsequent mental health treatment following a natural disaster, based on the results from a sample of home-coming Swiss tourists.
Tourists who had been potentially affected by the 2004 tsunami were assessed using the Post-traumatic Diagnostic Scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Post-traumatic Growth Inventory. Outcome variables were related to the degree of tsunami exposure. In addition, mental health treatment before and after the tsunami was assessed.
Of the 342 respondents, 55 (16.8%) fulfilled the criteria of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Evidence of anxiety or depressive disorder was found in 17.8% and 8.0%, respectively. The tsunami victims who had been directly affected showed significantly more symptoms of anxiety, depression and PTSD, as well as post-traumatic personal growth, than tourists who were indirectly affected or unaffected. A total of 12.3% of untreated respondents fulfilled the criteria for PTSD and 38% of respondents who had received psychiatric treatment were still fulfilling PTSD criteria 2(1/2) years after the tsunami.
A marked percentage of respondents reported symptoms of PTSD but they remained untreated or were treated insufficiently. We recommend that tourists returning from regions affected by natural disasters be informed about PTSD and that careful screening be given to those found to be at risk of PTSD. An open-door policy of mental health services is particularly needed for tourists returning home who have been affected by large-scale disasters.
PubMed ID
19373702 View in PubMed
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Abused women's vulnerability in daily life and in contact with psychiatric care: In the light of a caring science perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286928
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Aug;26(15-16):2384-2391
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Karin Örmon
Ulrica Hörberg
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Aug;26(15-16):2384-2391
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology
Battered Women - psychology
Behavioral Sciences
Clinical Studies as Topic
Female
Humans
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Sweden
Vulnerable Populations - psychology
Women's health
Abstract
The aim of the study is to deepen the understanding of abused women's vulnerability in relation to how the abuse and encounters with health care professionals affect life. A further aim is to highlight abused women's vulnerability with a caring science perspective.
Experience of abuse has consequences for the mental health of women and girls. Abused women may experience health care as unsupportive, and as a result, often chose not to disclose their experiences of abuse.
The results of two qualitative empirical studies were analysed along with a phenomenological meaning analysis in accordance with the methodological principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research.
Living one's life with experiences of abuse implies vulnerability, which can prevent abused women from achieving good health. This vulnerability results from insecurity regarding identity, along with the sense that one could have been a different individual if it were not for the abuse and thereby have a more fair chance in life. Being cared for within general psychiatric care could further increase this vulnerability. The healthcare professional's ability to care for the women who have experienced abuse leads to either an encounter of trust or else further suffering for the women.
A lifeworld-oriented caring science perspective as a foundation for care can contribute to care for abused women which reaches the existential dimensions of their vulnerability and vulnerable life situation.
It is evident that healthcare professionals should deepen their understanding of how abused women live, within a general psychiatric context. This study enables a deeper understanding of abused women's vulnerability in relation to how the abuse and encounters with healthcare professionals affect life.
PubMed ID
27349375 View in PubMed
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Acceptable long-term outcome in elderly intensive care unit patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133259
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2011 Jul;58(7):A4297
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Morten A Schrøder
Jesper Brøndum Poulsen
Anders Perner
Author Affiliation
Intensive Care Unit, 4131, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 København Ø, Denmark. mortenschroder@gmail.com
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2011 Jul;58(7):A4297
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Confidence Intervals
Denmark
Female
Hospital Mortality - trends
Humans
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Registries
Statistics, nonparametric
Survivors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The number of elderly intensive care unit (ICU) patients is increasing. We therefore assessed the long-term outcome in the elderly following intensive care.
The outcome status for 91 elderly (=75 years) and 659 nonelderly (18-74 years) ICU patients treated in the course of a one year period was obtained. A total of 36 of 37 eligible elderly survivors were interviewed about their health related quality of life (HRQOL), social services and their wish for intensive care.
The mortality (54% at follow-up and 64% after one year) was higher in the elderly ICU patients than in non-elderly ICU patients (33% and 37%, respectively, p
PubMed ID
21722543 View in PubMed
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Access to medical and supportive care for rural and remote cancer survivors in northern British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273959
Source
J Rural Health. 2014;30(3):311-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
A. Fuchsia Howard
Kirsten Smillie
Kristin Turnbull
Chelan Zirul
Dana Munroe
Amanda Ward
Pam Tobin
Arminee Kazanjian
Rob Olson
Source
J Rural Health. 2014;30(3):311-21
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - therapy
Qualitative Research
Rural Population
Survivors
Abstract
Rural cancer survivors (RCS) potentially have unique medical and supportive care experiences when they return to their communities posttreatment because of the availability and accessibility of health services. However, there is a limited understanding of cancer survivorship in rural communities.
The purpose of this study is to describe RCS experiences accessing medical and supportive care postcancer treatment.
Interviews and focus groups were conducted with 52 RCS residing in northern British Columbia, Canada. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis methods.
General Population RCS and First Nations RCS experienced challenges accessing timely medical care close to home, resulting in unmet medical needs. Emotional support services were rarely available, and, if they did exist, were difficult to access or not tailored to cancer survivors. Travel and distance were barriers to medical and psychological support and services, not only in terms of the cost of travel, but also the toll this took on family members. Many of the RCS lacked access to trusted and useful information. Financial assistance, for follow-up care and rehabilitation services, was rarely available, as was appropriate employment assistance.
Medical and supportive care can be inaccessible, unavailable, and unaffordable for cancer survivors living in rural northern communities.
PubMed ID
24483272 View in PubMed
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Accuracy in identifying patients with loss of consciousness in a police-operated emergency call centre - first step in the chain of survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163888
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2007 Jul;51(6):742-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
A. Bach
E F Christensen
Author Affiliation
Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Aarhus Traumacentre, Aarhus, Denmark. allanbach@dadlnet.dk
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2007 Jul;51(6):742-6
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Emergencies
False Negative Reactions
False Positive Reactions
Heart Arrest - diagnosis
Humans
Police
Survival Analysis
Survivors
Telephone
Unconsciousness - diagnosis - etiology - mortality
Wakefulness
Abstract
The first link in the 'chain of survival' is the activation of Emergency Medical Services (EMS). In the major part of Denmark, police officers operate the alarm 1-1-2 centre, including calls for EMS. Our aim was to study the police 1-1-2 operators' accuracy in identifying calls concerning patients with loss of consciousness as a key symptom of life-threatening conditions. 'Unconsciousness' was defined as patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of or = 9, 972 of whom were reported 'awake', giving a specificity of 72%. The positive predictive value (percentage of patients found with a GCS score of
PubMed ID
17465976 View in PubMed
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Acute disaster exposure and mental health complaints of Norwegian tsunami survivors six months post disaster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91783
Source
Psychiatry. 2008;71(3):266-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Heir Trond
Weisaeth Lars
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Center for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Ullevål University Hospital, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. trond.heir@medisin.uio.no
Source
Psychiatry. 2008;71(3):266-76
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology - psychology
Bereavement
Dangerous Behavior
Disasters - statistics & numerical data
Family Relations
Female
Friends
Helping Behavior
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - epidemiology
Survivors - psychology
Abstract
The objective was to investigate the relationship between possible disaster stressors and subsequent health problems among tourists experiencing the 2004 South-East Asia tsunami. A cross-sectional study was performed as a postal survey concerning the experiences of the disaster exposure in retrospect and the presence of psychological symptoms (GHQ-28) in Norwegian tsunami victims 6 months post disaster. The strongest predictors of health complaints were danger of death, witness impressions, and bereavements. Aggravated outcomes were also seen in those who helped others in the acute phase or had sole responsibility for children when the tsunami struck. Having a family member or close friend who was injured was reversely associated with health problems. Women reported more psychological distress than men, but the difference disappeared with increasing degree of danger exposure. Dose-response relationships to psychological distress were found for single exposure factors as well as for the cumulative effects of being exposed to several exposure variables.
PubMed ID
18834277 View in PubMed
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Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scoring system in acute myocardial infarction: a prospective validation study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54776
Source
Crit Care Med. 1995 May;23(5):854-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
U. Ludwigs
J. Hulting
Author Affiliation
Medical Intensive Care Unit, Department of Medicine, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Crit Care Med. 1995 May;23(5):854-9
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
APACHE
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Comparative Study
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - mortality
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study the usefulness of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scoring system for prognostication of inhospital mortality in acute myocardial infarction. DESIGN: A prospective validation study. SETTING: A medical intensive care unit (ICU) at a university hospital. PATIENTS: Over a 3-yr period, 2,007 admissions of 1,714 patients with acute myocardial infarction were studied. In readmissions to the medical ICU during the same hospital stay, only the first admission was studied. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Mean age of the patients was 72 +/- 10 yrs. The medical ICU mortality rate was 13% and total hospital mortality rate was 16%. Mean APACHE II score was 11.6 +/- 6.5. There was a close correlation between observed and predicted mortality rates in classes of patients with various APACHE II scores. Observed mortality in patients with scores of 20 to 24 was higher than the predicted mortality (p
PubMed ID
7736743 View in PubMed
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969 records – page 1 of 97.