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35 records – page 1 of 4.

Can global initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage 0 provide prognostic information on long-term mortality in men?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81140
Source
Chest. 2006 Aug;130(2):318-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Stavem Knut
Sandvik Leiv
Erikssen Jan
Author Affiliation
Medical Department, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway. knut.stavem@klinmed.uio.no
Source
Chest. 2006 Aug;130(2):318-25
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cause of Death - trends
Disease Progression
Follow-Up Studies
Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - mortality - physiopathology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Spirometry
Survival Rate - trends
Time Factors
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVES: To determine if the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stage 0 (subjects at risk for COPD) provides information about long-term mortality risk. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: From 1972 to 1975, clinical, physiologic, and biochemical parameters including respiratory symptoms, spirometry, and physical fitness were measured in 1,999 healthy men aged 40 to 59 years in an occupational cohort, of whom 1,623 had acceptable spirometry findings. In a proportional hazards model with follow-up until 2000, we assessed all-cause mortality according to GOLD stage 0, I, II, and III compared with "normal" subjects, after adjusting for known risk factors and potential confounders. RESULTS: After 26 years (range, 25 to 27 years), 615 men (38%) had died. In multivariate proportional hazards models, GOLD stage 0 subjects had a nonsignificantly increased hazard of death (hazard ratio [HR], 1.19; p = 0.21) after adjustment for age, smoking, physical fitness, body mass index, systolic BP, and serum cholesterol. Similarly, subjects in GOLD stage I (HR, 1.30; p = 0.05) and stage II (HR, 1.77; p
Notes
Comment In: Chest. 2006 Aug;130(2):309-1016899823
PubMed ID
16899828 View in PubMed
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CCL21 is associated with fatal outcomes in chronic heart failure: data from CORONA and GISSI-HF trials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115603
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2013 Jul;15(7):747-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Thor Ueland
Ståle H Nymo
Roberto Latini
John J V McMurray
John Kjekshus
Arne Yndestad
Alessandro Fucili
Aurelia Grosu
Serge Masson
Aldo P Maggioni
Lars Gullestad
Pål Aukrust
Author Affiliation
Research Institute for Internal Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway. r.ueland@medisin.uio.no
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2013 Jul;15(7):747-55
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Chemokine CCL21 - blood
Disease Progression
Double-Blind Method
Female
Fluorobenzenes - therapeutic use
Heart Failure - blood - drug therapy - mortality
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Pyrimidines - therapeutic use
Risk factors
Sulfonamides - therapeutic use
Survival Rate - trends
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Chronic heart failure (HF) is in part characterized by immune activation and inflammation, and factors that regulate lymphocyte trafficking and inflammation may contribute to the progression of this disorder. The homeostatic chemokine CCL21 is a potent regulator of T-cell migration into non-lymphoid tissue and may exert inflammatory properties and influence tissue remodelling. We therefore investigated CCL21 levels and association with fatal outcomes in patients with chronic HF.
Plasma CCL21 was measured at randomization in 1456 patients enrolled in the Controlled Rosuvastatin Multinational Trial in HF (CORONA) and in 1145 from the GISSI-HF trial. Association between CCL21 levels [given below as hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for 1 SD increase] with all-cause (n = 741) or cardiovascular (CV) mortality (n = 576) was evaluated with multivariable Cox proportional hazard models, adjusting for clinical risk factors, C-reactive protein, and NT-proBNP. In multivariable Cox models, CCL21 was associated with higher risk of all-cause mortality (HR 1.16, 95% CI 1.02-1.32; P = 0.020) and CV mortality (HR 1.20, 95% CI 1.08-1.33; P
PubMed ID
23487539 View in PubMed
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Clinical significance of ventricular tachyarrhythmias in patients treated with CRT-D.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114195
Source
Heart Rhythm. 2013 Jul;10(7):943-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Valentina Kutyifa
Helmut U Klein
Paul J Wang
Scott McNitt
Bronislava Polonsky
Endre Zima
Bela Merkely
Arthur J Moss
Wojciech Zareba
Author Affiliation
University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 14642, USA. Valentina.Kutyifa@heart. roehester.edu
Source
Heart Rhythm. 2013 Jul;10(7):943-50
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Defibrillators, Implantable
Disease Progression
Electrocardiography
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Heart rate
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Tachycardia, Ventricular - complications - physiopathology - therapy
Treatment Outcome
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Data on the outcome of cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) in patients developing ventricular arrhythmias are limited.
To evaluate the prognostic value of ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF) episodes by heart rate in patients enrolled in the Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial-Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy trial.
Slow VT was defined as VTs with heart rate 250 beats/min) were considered as a combined category. Primary end point was heart failure (HF) or death. Secondary end point included all-cause mortality.
There were 228 (12.7%) patients with slow VT and 198 (11.1%) with fast VT/VF. In time-dependent analysis, slow VT was associated with an increased risk of HF/death in CRT-D patients with left branch bundle block (LBBB; hazard ratio [HR] 3.19; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.83-5.55; P
Notes
Comment In: Heart Rhythm. 2013 Jul;10(7):951-223624159
PubMed ID
23639624 View in PubMed
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A comprehensive population-based characterization of heart failure with mid-range ejection fraction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295511
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2017 12; 19(12):1624-1634
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2017
Author
Angela S Koh
Wan Ting Tay
Tiew Hwa Katherine Teng
Ola Vedin
Lina Benson
Ulf Dahlstrom
Gianluigi Savarese
Carolyn S P Lam
Lars H Lund
Author Affiliation
National Heart Centre Singapore, Singapore.
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2017 12; 19(12):1624-1634
Date
12-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Cause of Death - trends
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - mortality - physiopathology
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Male
Prognosis
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Stroke Volume - physiology
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Clinical features and outcomes in the novel phenotype heart failure with mid-range ejection fraction [HFmrEF, ejection fraction (EF) 40-49%] were compared with heart failure with reduced EF (HFrEF, EF
Notes
CommentIn: Eur J Heart Fail. 2017 Dec;19(12):1635-1637 PMID 28948680
PubMed ID
28948683 View in PubMed
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Decreased urinary concentration of Tamm-Horsfall protein is associated with development of renal failure and cardiovascular death within 20 years in type 1 but not in type 2 diabetic patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93996
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2008;42(2):168-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Sejdiu Ilir
Torffvit Ole
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine, Institution of Clinical Sciences, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2008;42(2):168-74
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - urine
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - mortality - urine
Cause of Death - trends
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - urine
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - urine
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Kidney Failure - etiology - mortality - urine
Male
Middle Aged
Mucoproteins - urine
Prognosis
ROC Curve
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The first changes in the diabetic kidney are glycogen deposits in the epithelial cells of the thick ascending limb of Henle. These cells produce Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP). Is low excretion of THP associated with the development of renal insufficiency or cardiovascular disease? MATERIAL AND METHODS: Urine samples were collected at baseline in patients with type 1 (n = 131) and type 2 (n = 108) diabetes who were followed for a mean of 14 years (range 1-20 years) and 4.5 years (range 1-15 years), respectively. RESULTS: Twenty percent of type 1 and 54% of type 2 diabetic patients died and 24% and 29%, respectively developed uraemia. A decreased urinary concentration of THP (u-THP) was associated with an eight-fold increased risk of renal failure and cardiovascular death in type 1 but not in type 2 diabetic patients, irrespective of the degree of albuminuria and glycosylated haemoglobin and blood pressure levels. There were no differences in the degrees of albuminuria, serum creatinine or u-THP between the two types of diabetic patients at baseline. Low u-THP occurred in 8% and 9% of normoalbuminuric type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients, respectively. CONCLUSION: A decreased u-THP was associated with an eight-fold increased risk of cardiovascular death and uraemia in type 1 but not in type 2 diabetic patients.
PubMed ID
17907053 View in PubMed
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[Depressive symptoms worsen cardiovascular prognosis and shorten length of life in patients with arterial hypertension and ischemic heart disease].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134058
Source
Kardiologiia. 2011;51(2):59-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
R G Oganov
G V Pogosova
I E Koltunov
L V Romasenko
A D Deev
Iu M Iufereva
Source
Kardiologiia. 2011;51(2):59-66
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood pressure
Depression - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Disease Progression
Electrocardiography
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - complications - mortality - physiopathology
Male
Myocardial Ischemia - complications - mortality - physiopathology
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Survival Rate - trends
Abstract
The KOORDINATA study (clinical epidemiological program of investigation of depression in cardiological practice in patients with arterial hypertension and ischemic heart disease) was a prospective 3 year long multicenter study of effects of depressive and anxiety states on the course and prognosis of ischemic heart disease (IHD) and arterial hypertension (AH).
Patients (n=5038, age more or equal 55 years) with verified IHD and/or AH from 37 cities were included into the study. Symptoms of anxiety and depression were assessed by the HADS scale (Hospital Anxiety And Depression Scale) validated in Russia.
Clinically significant symptoms of anxiety ( more or equal 11 HADS) were present in 33 and 38%, of depression - in 30 and 38% of patients with IHD and AH, respectively. Presence of clinically manifested depression at initial examination increased 1.59 times combined risk of nonfatal and fatal cases (odds ratio [OR] 1.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30-1.96, p=0.0001), 1.64 times - risk of cardiovascular death (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.20-2.24, p=0.0021), and 1.82 times - risk of death from all causes (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.41-2.34, p=0.0001). It is known that for somatic patients crossover of anxiety and depression symptoms is typical (simultaneous presence of some symptoms of anxiety and depression). Total HADS score equal to 11 or more increased risk of all cause death (OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.08-1.84, p=0.0111), as well as fatal and nonfatal events (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.08-1.65, p=0.0089).
Taking into consideration negative effect of depressive symptoms on prognosis it is recommended to screen patients with IHD in the first place those who have had myocardial infarction and brain stroke with the aim of detection of depression and anxiety depressive symptoms and subsequent their adequate correction.
PubMed ID
21627600 View in PubMed
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[Depressive symptoms worsen prognosis in patients with arterial hypertension and ischemic heart disease: first results of prospective phase of Russian multicenter study COORDINATA].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158902
Source
Kardiologiia. 2007;47(10):24-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
E I Chazov
R G Oganov
G V Pogosova
A D Deev
S A Shal'nova
I E Koltunov
L V Romasenko
Author Affiliation
Research Center for Preventive Medicine, Petroverigsky per. 10, 101953 Moscow, Russia.
Source
Kardiologiia. 2007;47(10):24-30
Date
2007
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Pressure - physiology
Depression - complications - epidemiology
Disease Progression
Electrocardiography
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity - trends
Myocardial Ischemia - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Rate - trends
Time Factors
Abstract
COORDINATA - Russian multicenter prospective (3 year long) study having the aim to elucidate influence of symptoms of anxiety and depression on cardiovascular (CV) prognosis in patients with arterial hypertension (AH) and ischemic heart disease (IHD). Results of 1.5 years of prospective phase of the study are presented. Material and methods. Symptoms of depression and anxiety were assessed by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HDS) in 5038 patients with AH and/or IHD aged 55 years and older. By the end of 1.5 years follow up telephonic interview was carried out with 4449 patients or their relatives in the course of which occurrence of soft and hard end points (cardiovascular complications and deaths of IHD, cardiovascular and other causes) were established. There were 142 deaths (60.6% cardiovascular), 85 strokes, and 42 dynamic disturbances of cerebral circulation. Total number of hard and soft end points was 356 (8.0%). Presence of depressive, anxious, and combined anxious-depressive symptoms in patients with AH/IHD at initial examination increased 1.5 - 2 fold risk of development of cardiovascular catastrophes and death (due to IHD, CV and all causes). Besides psychological factors clear-cut influence on prognosis exerted sex, age, level of education and income of patients, smoking (both in the past and at inclusion in the study), low level of daily physical activity, elevated levels of blood pressure and heart rate, as well as a row of social characteristics of patients.
PubMed ID
18260940 View in PubMed
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Determinants of progression of aortic stiffness in hemodialysis patients: a prospective longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114114
Source
Hypertension. 2013 Jul;62(1):154-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Mihai S Utescu
Véronique Couture
Fabrice Mac-Way
Sacha A De Serres
Karine Marquis
Richard Larivière
Simon Desmeules
Marcel Lebel
Pierre Boutouyrie
Mohsen Agharazii
Author Affiliation
CHU de Québec Research Center, L’Hôtel Dieu de Québec Hospital Quebec, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Hypertension. 2013 Jul;62(1):154-60
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Kidney Failure, Chronic - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Quebec - epidemiology
Renal Dialysis - adverse effects
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Vascular Stiffness
Abstract
Aortic stiffness is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. However, the rate of progression of arterial stiffness and the role of cardiovascular risk factors in the progression of arterial stiffness has never been established in a longitudinal study. In a prospective, longitudinal, observational study, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity were assessed in 109 hemodialysis patients at baseline and after a mean follow-up of 1.2 years. We examined the impact of age, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, dialysis vintage, and pentosidine (a well-characterized, advanced glycation end products) on the rate of progression of aortic stiffness. The annual rate of changes in carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity were 0.84 m/s per year (95% confidence interval, 0.50-1.12 m/s per year) and -0.66 m/s per year (95% confidence interval, -0.85 to -0.47 m/s per year), respectively. Older subjects, and patients with diabetes mellitus or atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease had higher aortic stiffness at baseline, however, the rate of progression of aortic stiffness was only determined by plasma pentosidine levels (P=0.001). The degree of baseline aortic stiffness was a significant determinant of the regression of brachial stiffness (P
PubMed ID
23648699 View in PubMed
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Does telomere length predict decline in physical functioning in older twin sisters during an 11-year follow-up?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278105
Source
Age (Dordr). 2016 Apr;38(2):34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Elina Sillanpää
Timo Törmäkangas
Taina Rantanen
Jaakko Kaprio
Sarianna Sipilä
Source
Age (Dordr). 2016 Apr;38(2):34
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging
Disease Progression
Diseases in Twins - metabolism - mortality - physiopathology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Forecasting
Humans
Leukocytes - metabolism
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Motor Activity
Survival Rate - trends
Telomere - physiology
Twins
Abstract
Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is known to be associated with mortality, but its association with age-related decline in physical functioning and the development of disability is less clear. This study examined the associations between LTL and physical functioning, and investigated whether LTL predicts level of physical functioning over an 11-year follow-up. Older mono- (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twin sisters (n = 386) participated in the study. Relative LTL was measured by qPCR at baseline. Physical functioning was measured by 6-min walking distance and level of physical activity (PA). Walking distance was measured at baseline and at 3-year follow-up. PA was assessed by questionnaire at baseline and at 3- and 11-year follow-ups. The baseline analysis was performed with path models, adjusted with age and within-pair dependence of twin pairs. The longitudinal analysis was performed with a repeated measures linear model adjusted for age and longitudinal within-pair dependence. A nonrandom missing data analysis was utilized. At baseline, in all individuals, LTL was associated with PA (est. 0.14, SE 0.06, p = 0.011), but not with walking distance. Over the follow-up, a borderline significant association was observed between LTL and walking distance (est. 0.14, SE 0.07, p = 0.060) and a significant association between LTL and PA (est. 0.19, SE 0.06, p = 0.001). The results suggest that LTL is associated with PA and may, therefore, serve as a biomarker predicting the development of disability. Longitudinal associations between LTL and PA were observed only when nonrandom data missingness was taken into account in the analysis.
PubMed ID
26940017 View in PubMed
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The evolving epidemiology of valvular aortic stenosis. the Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121072
Source
Heart. 2013 Mar;99(6):396-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Gry Wisthus Eveborn
Henrik Schirmer
Geir Heggelund
Per Lunde
Knut Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Department of Heart Disease, Division of Cardiothoracic and Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital of Northern Norway, Tromsø 9038, Norway. gry.eveborn@unn.no
Source
Heart. 2013 Mar;99(6):396-400
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Valve - surgery - ultrasonography
Aortic Valve Stenosis - epidemiology - surgery - ultrasonography
Disease Progression
Echocardiography
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Valve Prosthesis
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Rate - trends
Abstract
To assess prevalence, incidence, prognosis and progression of degenerative valvular aortic stenosis (AS).
The Tromsø Study and the University Hospital of North Norway.
Population based prospective study.
Over a 14 year span we performed three repeated echocardiographic examinations (1994, 2001 and 2008) of a random sample of initially 3273 participants. Data from the only hospital serving this population were included.
There were 164 subjects with AS. Prevalence consistently increased with age, average values being 0.2% in the 50-59 year cohort, 1.3% in the 60-69 year cohort, 3.9% in the 70-79 year cohort and 9.8% in the 80-89 year cohort. The incidence rate in the study was 4.9‰/year. The mean annual increase in mean transvalvular pressure gradient was 3.2 mm Hg. The increase was lower in mild AS than in more severe disease, disclosing a non-linear development of the gradient, but with large individual variations. Mortality was not significantly increased in the asymptomatic AS-group (HR = 1.28), nor in those who received aortic valve replacement (n = 34, HR = 0.93), compared with the general population.
This is the first study to document the incidence and prognosis of AS in a general population with surgery as a treatment option. It reveals an accelerated progression of the aortic mean gradient as the disease advances. The prognosis of AS seems to be comparable with the normal population in the asymptomatic stage and after successful surgery, indicating that the follow-up and timing of surgery has been adequate for this patient group.
PubMed ID
22942293 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.