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Achievements in congenital heart defect surgery: a prospective, 40-year study of 7038 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262107
Source
Circulation. 2015 Jan 27;131(4):337-46; discussion 346
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-27-2015
Author
Gunnar Erikssen
Knut Liestøl
Egil Seem
Sigurd Birkeland
Kjell Johan Saatvedt
Tom Nilsen Hoel
Gaute Døhlen
Helge Skulstad
Jan Ludvig Svennevig
Erik Thaulow
Harald Lauritz Lindberg
Source
Circulation. 2015 Jan 27;131(4):337-46; discussion 346
Date
Jan-27-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Defects, Congenital - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Humans
Infant
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Survival Rate - trends
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This article presents an update of the results achieved by modern surgery in congenital heart defects (CHDs) over the past 40 years regarding survival and the need for reoperations, especially focusing on the results from the past 2 decades.
From 1971 to 2011, all 7038 patients
Notes
Comment In: Circulation. 2015 Jan 27;131(4):328-3025538228
PubMed ID
25538230 View in PubMed
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[Age-related characteristics of the efficacy of different glucocorticosteroids in the therapy of acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266595
Source
Ter Arkh. 2015;87(7):41-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
A I Karachunskii
Iu V Rumiantseva
S N Lagoiko
C. Bührer
G. Tallen
O V Aleinikova
O I Bydanov
N V Korepanova
L V Baidun
T V Nasedkina
A. von Stackelberg
G A Novichkova
A A Maschan
D V Litvinov
N I Ponomareva
K L Kondratchik
E G Mansurova
L G Fechina
O V Streneva
N B Iudina
G R Sharapova
A V Shamardina
I E Gerbek
A P Shapochnik
A G Rumiantsev
G. Henze
Source
Ter Arkh. 2015;87(7):41-50
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Dexamethasone - therapeutic use
Female
Glucocorticoids - therapeutic use
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Methylprednisolone - therapeutic use
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma - drug therapy - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Republic of Belarus - epidemiology
Russia - epidemiology
Survival Rate - trends
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine predictors for decision-making on a differential approach to choosing glucocorticosteroids (GCS) for children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).
The analysis covered 1064 primary patients aged to 1 to 18 years with ALL who had been registered at the clinics of Russia and Belorussia in April 2002 to November 2006. Before induction therapy, the patients were randomized into a dexamethasone (DEXA) 6 mg/m2 group (n=539) and a methylprednisolone (MePRED) 60 mg/m2 one (n=525).
The entire group showed no statistically significant differences in survival rates between the patients receiving DEXA or MePRED. However, an analysis of age groups revealed the benefits of DEXA in children younger than 14 years (the event-free survival (EFS) was 76±2 and 71±2%, respectively (p=0.048); the overall survival (OS) was 81±2 and 77±2%, respectively (p=0.046); therapy-induced mortality was 6.4% (DEXA) andl 1.1% (MePRED) (p=0.01 4); the rate of isolated extramedullary relapses was 1.5% (DEXA) and 4.4% (MePRED) (p=0.009). At the same time, EFS and OS in 14-to-18-year-old adolescents were statistically significantly higher than in those who used MePRED (EFS, 65±6 and 52±6%, respectively (p=0.087); OS, 72±6 and 61±6%, respectively; (p=0.l 7).
The findings suggest that it is possible that the choice of a GCS for ALL therapy must be also based on a patient's age. There is a need for further studies of this matter in prospective randomized multicenter trials in children and adolescents.
PubMed ID
26390724 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of the late irradiation effects in the population of the north part of the East-Urals radioactive track]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94539
Source
Gig Sanit. 2009 May-Jun;(3):49-51
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iarmoshenko I V
Kon'shina L G
Lezhnin V L
Zhukovskiii M V
Source
Gig Sanit. 2009 May-Jun;(3):49-51
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Nuclear Power Plants
Radiation Injuries - epidemiology
Radiation, Ionizing
Radioactive Hazard Release
Retrospective Studies
Siberia - epidemiology
Survival Rate - trends
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Death records were used to analyze cancer mortality in the rural areas of the Kamensky District, Sverdlovsk Region, within the East-Urals radioactive track area. A study group showed a significant increase in cancer mortality as compared with a control group (65 of the 691 examinees; 90% confidence interval (CI) 18-144; the mean colonic radiation dose was 80 and 3 mGy in the study and control groups, respectively). The additional relative risk per colonic dose was 1.3 Gy(-1) (90% CI 0.36-2.9 Gy(-1)). The association of the additional relative risk with the age-related and time factors was studied and revealed.
PubMed ID
19645107 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Antitubercular vaccination of children in the Irkutsk region: the status and prospects]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34499
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1997;(1):59-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997

Arrhythmia characterization and long-term outcomes in catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137113
Source
Heart Rhythm. 2011 Jun;8(6):864-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Raymond W Sy
Michael H Gollob
George J Klein
Raymond Yee
Allan C Skanes
Lorne J Gula
Peter Leong-Sit
Robert M Gow
Martin S Green
David H Birnie
Andrew D Krahn
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Heart Rhythm. 2011 Jun;8(6):864-71
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Aged
Catecholamines - metabolism
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA - genetics
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Defibrillators, Implantable
Electrocardiography
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Ontario - epidemiology
Risk factors
Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel - genetics
Survival Rate - trends
Syncope - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Tachycardia, Ventricular - complications - genetics - metabolism
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is characterized by adrenergically induced ventricular tachycardia (VT) associated with syncope and sudden death.
This study sought to characterize arrhythmias associated with CPVT with respect to provocation by exercise and drugs, electrocardiographic characteristics, and association with long-term outcomes; and to explore the relation between age and clinical presentation.
Seventy patients from 16 families were evaluated with exercise and selective adrenaline challenge, and screened for RyR2 mutations. CPVT was diagnosed in probands with symptoms and stress- or adrenaline-provoked VT, or in asymptomatic relatives with provoked VT or RyR2 mutations. Patients were followed up for recurrent syncope, VT, and sudden death.
Twenty-seven patients including 16 probands were identified (median age 35 years, 67% female). Presentation was cardiac arrest in 33% and syncope in 56%, and 11% were asymptomatic. Polymorphic or bidirectional VT was provoked with exercise in 63% and adrenaline in 82%. The initiating beat of VT was late-coupled and wide (coupling interval 418 ± 42 ms; QRSd 131 ± 17 ms), and QRS morphology suggested an outflow tract origin in 59%. During follow-up of 6.2 ± 5.7 years, 2 patients died despite an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), 4 patients received ICD therapy for VT, and 5 patients had inappropriate therapy for supraventricular tachycardia. Patients presenting with late-onset CPVT (age > 21; n = 10) were often female (80%) and less likely to have RyR2 (Ryanodine receptor type 2) mutations (33%), and fatal events were not observed during follow-up (4.1 ± 3.6 years).
Ventricular arrhythmia in CPVT is often initiated from the outflow tract region. Despite ß-blocker therapy and selective ICD implantation, breakthrough arrhythmias occur and may be associated with adverse outcomes.
Notes
Comment In: Heart Rhythm. 2011 Jun;8(6):872-321338709
PubMed ID
21315846 View in PubMed
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Aspects of esophageal atresia in a population-based setting: incidence, mortality, and cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130247
Source
Pediatr Surg Int. 2012 Mar;28(3):249-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Jenny Oddsberg
Yunxia Lu
Jesper Lagergren
Author Affiliation
Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, 171 76, Stockholm, Sweden. jenny.oddsberg@karolinska.se
Source
Pediatr Surg Int. 2012 Mar;28(3):249-57
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Esophageal Atresia - complications - epidemiology
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Population Surveillance
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To estimate the incidence, mortality and cancer risk of the congenital malformation esophageal atresia (EA) in a population-based investigation.
A population-based cohort study of EA patients registered in three nationwide registers in Sweden in 1964-2007. The incidence of EA per total number of live births was assessed. Mortality and cancer occurrence were expressed as standardized mortality ratio (SMR) and standardized incidence ratio (SIR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Mortality was further analyzed by Cox regression and expressed as hazard ratio with 95% CI.
The EA cohort comprised 1,126 patients. The mean incidence was 3.16 per 10,000 live births, without any temporal changes (p for trend =0.94). Associated anomalies were present in 42% and chromosomal abnormalities in 5%. EA patients had an almost 12 times higher risk of mortality compared to the background population (SMR 11.8, 95% CI 10.3-13.5). The mortality increase was most pronounced during the first 5 years after birth. Survival improved during the study period (p for trend =0.0001). EA did not entail a strongly increased cancer risk (SIR 0.9; 95% CI 0.2-2.6).
EA has a stable incidence, the survival has improved substantially during recent decades, and the cancer risk might not be increased.
PubMed ID
22020495 View in PubMed
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[Atmospheric air pollution and population mortality in Russian Federation regions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168712
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2006;(5):7-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
G M Zemlianaia
L G Solenova
V A Kislitsin
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2006;(5):7-12
Date
2006
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental Illness - mortality
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Survival Rate - trends
Urban Population
Abstract
Regularly published national reports on population health in Russian Federation, based on the results of statistic analyses and the data from hygienic and epidemiological studies, demonstrate associations between exposure to hazardous environmental factors and population morbidity. Research into correlations between exposure to such factors and population health status using extensive databases, makes it possible to obtain statistically significant results and put forward hypotheses for epidemiological studies. The aim of this research was to study the levels and dynamics of population mortality, and atmospheric air condition, as well as correlations between them in regional centers of Russian Federation. The study covers the period from 1985 through 1998.
PubMed ID
16789535 View in PubMed
Less detail

Brain tumors in childhood and adolescence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202386
Source
Pediatr Neurol. 1999 Mar;20(3):198-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
D L Keene
E. Hsu
E. Ventureyra
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurology, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Neurol. 1999 Mar;20(3):198-203
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Brain Neoplasms - classification - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Abstract
Brain tumors are the second most common neoplasm in childhood and adolescence. With the recent advances in technology, changes in tumor incidence have been reported. This study examines this statement. A 19-year retrospective case review of primary brain tumors in persons younger than 18 years of age at time of diagnosis, who had permanent residence in our catchment area, was performed. Data were examined for changes in presenting symptoms and signs and incidence rates for tumors on the basis of anatomic location and histologic tumor type. An incidence rate of 2.76 per 100,000 people younger than 18 years of age was found. During the period of this study a small, but significant, trend toward increasing incidence was evident. No changes in patterns of presentation or duration of symptoms before diagnosis was observed. The incidence rate based on histologic tumor diagnosis remained fairly constant during the study period.
PubMed ID
10207928 View in PubMed
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84 records – page 1 of 9.