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708 records – page 1 of 71.

A 3-year follow-up study of preformed beta-quartz glass-ceramic insert restorations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195752
Source
Quintessence Int. 2000 Jan;31(1):25-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2000
Author
G. Sjögren
S O Hedlund
C. Jonsson
A. Sandström
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Materials Science, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden. Goran.Sjogren@odont.umu.se
Source
Quintessence Int. 2000 Jan;31(1):25-31
Date
Jan-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bicuspid
Ceramics - chemistry
Color
Dental Caries - classification
Dental Marginal Adaptation
Dental Plaque - classification
Dental Restoration Failure
Dental Restoration, Permanent - classification
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - classification
Glass - chemistry
Humans
Inlays - classification
Male
Middle Aged
Molar
Quartz - chemistry
Surface Properties
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of preformed beta-quartz glass-ceramic insert restorations.
Nine Class I and 30 Class II beta-quartz glass-ceramic insert restorations were placed in 16 patients who were seen regularly by personnel at Umeå University Dental School. The California Dental Association criteria were used to evaluate the restorations at baseline, 6 months, and 1, 2, and 3 years after luting. The occurrence of postoperative sensitivity, the time taken to manufacture each restoration, and certain periodontal conditions were also evaluated.
Sixty-nine percent of the restorations were rated satisfactory at the 3-year examination. During the follow-up period, 4 became loose and 7 were fractured or had flaking surfaces. Caries was registered in connection with 1 restoration. Excellent ratings were obtained for marginal integrity, anatomic form, surface, and color in 62%, 84%, 32%, and 44% of the restorations, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the occurrence of plaque and bleeding on probing in comparison with the controls. The mean overall time for placement was 38 minutes. The estimated survival rate (Kaplan-Meier) was 59% after 3.5 years.
The quality of the beta-quartz glass-ceramic restorations in the present study was inferior to that presented in most earlier studies of ceramic or resin composite posterior restorations placed in patients treated at university clinics. Both the technique and the beta-quartz glass-ceramic inserts have to be evaluated in more long-term studies to assess the possibility of their serving as an alternative restorative technique.
PubMed ID
11203902 View in PubMed
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10-year survival and quality of life in patients with high-risk pN0 prostate cancer following definitive radiotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94068
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2007 Nov 15;69(4):1074-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2007
Author
Berg Arne
Lilleby Wolfgang
Bruland Oyvind Sverre
Fosså Sophie Dorothea
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. arne.berg@radiumhospitalet.no
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2007 Nov 15;69(4):1074-83
Date
Nov-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Case-Control Studies
Disease Progression
Erectile Dysfunction - physiopathology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Norway
Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - radiotherapy
Quality of Life
Radiotherapy, Conformal
Survival Analysis
Urination Disorders - physiopathology
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate long-term overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), clinical progression-free survival (cPFS), and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) following definitive radiotherapy (RT) given to T(1-4p)N(0)M(0) prostate cancer patients provided by a single institution between 1989 and 1996. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We assessed outcome among 203 patients who had completed three-dimensional conformal RT (66 Gy) without hormone treatment and in whom staging by lymphadenectomy had been performed. OS was compared with an age-matched control group from the general population. A cross-sectional, self-report survey of HRQoL was performed among surviving patients. RESULTS: Median observation time was 10 years (range, 1-16 years). Eighty-one percent had high-risk tumors defined as T(3-4) or Gleason score (GS) > or =7B (4+3). Among these, 10-year OS, CSS, and cPFS rates were 52%, 66%, and 39%, respectively. The corresponding fractions in low-risk patients (T(1-2) and GS or =7B.
PubMed ID
17703896 View in PubMed
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40 years after the first atrial switch procedure in patients with transposition of the great arteries: long-term results in Toronto and Zurich.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197150
Source
Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2000 Aug;48(4):233-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
E. Oechslin
R. Jenni
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, University Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland. erwin.oechslin@dim.usz.ch
Source
Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2000 Aug;48(4):233-7
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Actuarial Analysis
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Arrhythmias, Cardiac - etiology
Cause of Death
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology
Echocardiography
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - etiology - mortality
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Quality of Life
Reoperation - statistics & numerical data
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Analysis
Switzerland - epidemiology
Time Factors
Transposition of Great Vessels - complications - mortality - psychology - surgery
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Dysfunction, Right - etiology - mortality
Abstract
The atrial switch procedure dramatically improved the prognosis of children with complete transposition of the great arteries (TGA). Overall actuarial survival was approximately 75% after 25 years and was better in patients with simple TGA than in those with complex TGA. Mortality by any cause (16%) and cardiovascular mortality (12% and 13%) were comparable in both centers. Progressive congestive heart failure and sudden death were the principal modes of death. Most of the survivors denied any symptoms or had mild limitations in their daily activities. However, long-term problems in this growing population of adults are challenging and include late arrhythmias (up to two thirds of the patients), systemic ventricular (SV) failure, systemic atrioventricular valve regurgitation and reoperations, such as baffle reconstruction, being the most frequent. Objective assessment of SV function obtained by echocardiography is difficult. It may include fractional area change and tricuspid annular motion. Survivors after an atrial switch procedure are unique and have a good quality of life. However, the definitive and true history of the RV supporting the systemic circulation is not as yet known.
PubMed ID
11005599 View in PubMed
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Acute leukemia in middle Norway 1984-88.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23471
Source
Leuk Lymphoma. 1994 Dec;16(1-2):65-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
J. Lamvik
I. Dybedal
J. Hammerstrøm
A. Waage
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Trondheim University Hospital, Norway.
Source
Leuk Lymphoma. 1994 Dec;16(1-2):65-71
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Leukemia, Myeloid - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prognosis
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
One hundred and eight adult patients with acute leukemia were diagnosed in the middle Norwegian health region during the 5-year period 1984-88, giving an incidence rate of 4.6/100,000 per year. Nine patients had acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), 93 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 6 patients acute leukemia without definite sub-classification. The median age of AML patients was 66 years. Thirty-five patients (median age 78 years) were found non-suitable for cytotoxic drugs, while 58 AML patients (median age 57 years) were given aplasia-inducing drug combinations according to one of three treatment programs depending on the time of diagnosis and age, in order to induce remission. Six patients were given oral drugs or low dose ara-C. All patients were followed until death or for an observation time of more than 5 years (median 7 years). The overall long term survival was found to be 12/108 for all acute leukemias, 8/93 for AML patients and 4/9 for ALL patients. For the AML patients given intravenous aplasia-inducing drugs the remission rate was 0.65, the median remission duration 12.2 months and the 5-year survival rate 0.19. For 31 AML patients, (median age 41 years), started on an intensive chemotherapy program, the 5-year survival rate was 0.32 and the relapse-free 5-year survival rate for the 22 patients entering complete remission was also 0.32.
PubMed ID
7696933 View in PubMed
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Acute respiratory distress syndrome: nationwide changes in incidence, treatment and mortality over 23 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118376
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2013 Jan;57(1):37-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
M I Sigurdsson
K. Sigvaldason
T S Gunnarsson
A. Moller
G H Sigurdsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. gislihs@landspitali.is
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2013 Jan;57(1):37-45
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
APACHE
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Infant
Intensive Care
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Positive-Pressure Respiration
Prognosis
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Respiratory Function Tests
Respiratory Insufficiency - epidemiology - etiology
Sex Factors
Survival
Survival Analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess population-based changes in incidence, treatment, and in short- and long-term survival of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) over 23 years.
Analysis of all patients in Iceland who fulfilled the consensus criteria for ARDS in 1988-2010. Demographic variables, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scores and ventilation parameters were collected from hospital charts.
The age-standardised incidence of ARDS during the study period was 7.2 cases per 100,000 person-years and was increased by 0.2 cases per year (P?
Notes
Comment In: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2013 Jan;57(1):1-223216359
PubMed ID
23216361 View in PubMed
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Addressing challenges in future surveillance after surgery for early-stage cervical cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267055
Source
Int J Gynecol Cancer. 2015 Feb;25(2):309-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Katrine Fuglsang
Lone Kjeld Petersen
Jan Blaakaer
Source
Int J Gynecol Cancer. 2015 Feb;25(2):309-14
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - mortality - pathology - surgery
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Physiologic - methods
Neoplasm Staging
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Survival Analysis
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - surgery
Watchful Waiting
Young Adult
Abstract
This study examines surveillance after early-stage cervical cancer surgery. Since the 1980s, the value of surveillance has been discussed continuously. The main question explored is whether surveillance serves the purpose of ensuring early diagnosis of recurrence.
A retrospective cohort study included 389 women with cervical cancer who underwent surgery as the primary treatment modality at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, from 1996 to 2011. We used data from patient files and the Danish National Pathology Data Bank. The cumulative risk was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and tested by the log-rank test.
Forty-three women (11%) had recurrence. Only 27% of the recurrent cases were diagnosed at a scheduled surveillance appointment, but they were often asymptomatic and seemed to have a better outcome after treatment compared with the recurrent cases diagnosed at self-referral.The 5-year survival was overall 91.3%, recurrence-free survival was 96%, and cancer-specific survival was 54%. The median recurrence-free interval was 23 months (range, 4-144) for the symptomatic patients and 14 months (range, 4-48) for the asymptomatic patients. The median survival after recurrence was 12 months (range, 2-132) for the symptomatic patients and 156 months (range, 40-180) for the asymptomatic patients.
At the moment, neither the value of surveillance nor the significance of self-referral related to survival after recurrence is known. In this study, those who are diagnosed with recurrence before symptom onset seem to fare better in terms of 5-year survival than those who are diagnosed after self-referral because of symptoms.
PubMed ID
25594142 View in PubMed
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Adenocarcinoma of the prostate in Iceland: a population-based study of stage, Gleason grade, treatment and long-term survival in males diagnosed between 1983 and 1987.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81046
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2006;40(4):265-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Jonsson E.
Sigbjarnarson H P
Tomasson J.
Benediktsdottir K R
Tryggvadottir L.
Hrafnkelsson J.
Olafsdottir E J
Tulinius H.
Jonasson J G
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Landspitali University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. eirikjon@lanspitali.is
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2006;40(4):265-71
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - therapy
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasm Staging
Prostatic Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - therapy
Registries
Survival Analysis
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate adenocarcinoma of the prostate in a single population with an extended follow-up period. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Using the Icelandic Cancer Registry, we identified all Icelandic men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1983 and 1987. Disease stage, initial treatment and follow-up information were obtained from hospital records and death certificates. A critical evaluation was made of the accuracy of the death certificates regarding prostate cancer. All available histology information was reviewed and graded according to the Gleason grading system. RESULTS: A total of 414 men were diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Of these, 370 were alive at the time of diagnosis and stage could be determined. Four stage groups were defined: focal incidental (n=50); localized (n=164); local advanced (n=32); and metastatic disease (n=124). The mean age at diagnosis was 74.4 years (range 53-94 years). The combined Gleason score was 2-5 in 89, 6-7 in 117, 8-10 in 117 and unknown in 47 cases. The median follow-up period for the group was 6.15 years (range 0.3-19.8 years). Thirty men received treatment with curative intent: radiation therapy, n=20; and radical prostatectomy, n=10. A total of 334 patients died during the follow-up period, of whom 168 (50%) died of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer-specific survival at 10 and 15 years was 100% and 90.6%, respectively for focal incidental cancer; 73.1% and 60.8% for men with localized disease; 23.4% and 11.7% for local advanced disease; and 6.81% and 5.45% for metastatic disease. A Cox multivariate analysis showed age, stage and Gleason score to be independent predictors of prostate cancer death. A total of 104 patients with localized disease and a Gleason score of
PubMed ID
16916765 View in PubMed
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Adjuvant capecitabine, docetaxel, cyclophosphamide, and epirubicin for early breast cancer: final analysis of the randomized FinXX trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129460
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2012 Jan 1;30(1):11-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2012
Author
Heikki Joensuu
Pirkko-Liisa Kellokumpu-Lehtinen
Riikka Huovinen
Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen
Minna Tanner
Riitta Kokko
Johan Ahlgren
Päivi Auvinen
Outi Paija
Leena Helle
Kenneth Villman
Paul Nyandoto
Greger Nilsson
Marjo Pajunen
Raija Asola
Paula Poikonen
Mika Leinonen
Vesa Kataja
Petri Bono
Henrik Lindman
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Haartmaninkatu 4, PO Box 180, FIN-00029 Helsinki, Finland. heikki.joensuu@hus.fi
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2012 Jan 1;30(1):11-8
Date
Jan-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic - administration & dosage
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Breast Neoplasms - chemistry - drug therapy - mortality - pathology - surgery
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast - drug therapy - pathology
Carcinoma, Lobular - drug therapy - pathology
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Cyclophosphamide - administration & dosage
Deoxycytidine - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Disease-Free Survival
Drug Administration Schedule
Epirubicin - administration & dosage
Female
Finland
Fluorouracil - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lymphatic Metastasis
Mastectomy - methods
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Grading
Neoplasm Staging
Prospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Taxoids - administration & dosage
Treatment Outcome
Tumor Markers, Biological - analysis
Abstract
Capecitabine is an active agent in the treatment of breast cancer. It is not known whether integration of capecitabine into an adjuvant regimen that contains a taxane, an anthracycline, and cyclophosphamide improves outcome in early breast cancer.
Women with axillary node-positive or high-risk node-negative breast cancer were randomly assigned to receive either three cycles of docetaxel and capecitabine (TX) followed by three cycles of cyclophosphamide, epirubicin, and capecitabine (CEX; n = 753) or three cycles of docetaxel (T) followed by three cycles of cyclophosphamide, epirubicin, and fluorouracil (CEF; n = 747). The primary end point was recurrence-free survival (RFS).
During a median follow-up time of 59 months, 214 RFS events occurred (local or distant recurrences or deaths; TX/CEX, n = 96; T/CEF, n = 118). RFS was not significantly different between the groups (hazard ratio [HR], 0.79; 95% CI, 0.60 to 1.04; P = .087; 5-year RFS, 86.6% for TX/CEX v 84.1% for T/CEF). Fifty-six patients assigned to TX/CEX died during the follow-up compared with 75 of patients assigned to T/CEF (HR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.52 to 1.04; P = .080). In exploratory analyses, TX/CEX improved breast cancer-specific survival (HR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.44 to 0.95; P = .027) and RFS in women with triple-negative disease and in women who had more than three metastatic axillary lymph nodes at the time of diagnosis. We detected little severe late toxicity.
Integration of capecitabine into a regimen that contains docetaxel, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide did not improve RFS significantly compared with a similar regimen without capecitabine.
Notes
Comment In: J Clin Oncol. 2012 Jan 1;30(1):1-222105825
PubMed ID
22105826 View in PubMed
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Adjuvant chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil and levamisole) in Dukes' B and C colorectal carcinoma. A cost-effectiveness analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22339
Source
Ann Oncol. 1997 Jan;8(1):65-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
J. Norum
B. Vonen
J A Olsen
A. Revhaug
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Ann Oncol. 1997 Jan;8(1):65-70
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - economics - therapeutic use
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant - economics
Colorectal Neoplasms - drug therapy - economics - mortality - pathology - surgery
Colostomy
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Fluorouracil - administration & dosage - economics
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Costs
Humans
Length of Stay - economics
Levamisole - administration & dosage - economics
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Travel - economics
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Adjuvant chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil, levamisole) is now standard practice in the treatment of Dukes' B and C coloretal carcinoma (CRC), and this has increased the financial burden on health care systems world-wide. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between 1993 and 1996, 95 patients in northern Norway were included in a national randomised CRC study, and assigned to surgery plus adjuvant chemotherapy or surgery alone. In April 1996, 94 of the patients were evaluable and 82 were still alive. The total treatment costs (hospital stay, surgery, chemotherapy, administrative and travelling costs) were calculated. A questionnaire was mailed to all survivors for assessment of the quality of their lives (QoL) (EuroQol questionnaire, a simple QoL-scale, global QoL-measure of the EORTC QLQ-C30), and 62 of them (76%) responded. RESULTS: Adjuvant chemotherapy in Dukes' B and C CRC raised the total treatment costs by 3,369 pounds. The median QoL was 0.83 (0-1 scale) in both arms. Employing a 5% discount rate and an improved survival of adjuvant therapy ranging from 5% to 15%, we calculated the cost of one gained quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) to be between 4,800 pounds and 16,800 pounds. CONCLUSION: Using a cut-off point level of 20,000 pounds per QALY, adjuvant chemotherapy in CRC appears to be cost-effective only when the improvement in 5-year survival is > or = 5%. Adjuvant chemotherapy does not affect short-term QoL.
PubMed ID
9093709 View in PubMed
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Age and duration of follow-up as modulators of the risk for ischemic heart disease associated with high plasma C-reactive protein levels in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192391
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2001 Nov 12;161(20):2474-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-12-2001
Author
M. Pirro
J. Bergeron
G R Dagenais
P M Bernard
B. Cantin
J P Després
B. Lamarche
Author Affiliation
Lipid Research Center, R-9600, CHUL Research Center, 2705 Laurier Blvd, Ste-Foy, Québec, Canada G1V 4G2.
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2001 Nov 12;161(20):2474-80
Date
Nov-12-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Coronary Disease - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Inflammation
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Population Surveillance
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
Plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) levels recently have been identified as an emerging risk factor for ischemic heart disease (IHD). However, whether plasma CRP levels predict an increased risk for future IHD beyond traditional risk factors has yet to be evaluated in a large prospective, population-based study.
The association between elevated plasma CRP levels and the risk for future IHD was investigated in the prospective, population-based cohort of 2037 IHD-free middle-aged men from the Quebec Cardiovascular Study. During a 5-year follow-up, 105 first IHD events were recorded. Baseline plasma CRP levels were measured using a highly sensitive assay.
High plasma CRP concentrations (equal to or above vs below the median level of 1.77 mg/L) were associated with a significant 1.8-fold increase in IHD risk (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-2.7). This association remained significant after adjustment for lipid risk factors but not when the simultaneous contribution of nonlipid traditional risk factors was taken into account. Multivariate analyses indicated that CRP level predicted short-term risk for IHD (events that occurred 2 years). Moreover, high plasma CRP levels predicted an increased risk for IHD, independent of any other confounder, in younger (55 years) individuals.
Plasma CRP levels may provide independent information on IHD risk only in younger middle-aged men and in the case of IHD events that may occur relatively soon after the baseline evaluation.
PubMed ID
11700160 View in PubMed
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708 records – page 1 of 71.