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Actuarial survival of a large Canadian cohort of preterm infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172012
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2005;5:40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Huw P Jones
Stella Karuri
Catherine M G Cronin
Arne Ohlsson
Abraham Peliowski
Anne Synnes
Shoo K Lee
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, St Mary's Hospital, Portsmouth, UK. joneshuw@doctors.org.uk
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2005;5:40
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis
Age Factors
Birth weight
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Male
Multiple Birth Offspring - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge
Prospective Studies
Sex Factors
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The increased survival of preterm and very low birth weight infants in recent years has been well documented but continued surveillance is required in order to monitor the effects of new therapeutic interventions. Gestation and birth weight specific survival rates most accurately reflect the outcome of perinatal care. Our aims were to determine survival to discharge for a large Canadian cohort of preterm infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and to examine the effect of gender on survival and the effect of increasing postnatal age on predicted survival.
Outcomes for all 19,507 infants admitted to 17 NICUs throughout Canada between January 1996 and October 1997 were collected prospectively. Babies with congenital anomalies were excluded from the study population. Gestation and birth weight specific survival for all infants with birth weight
Notes
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PubMed ID
16280080 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jul;24 Suppl B:6B-8B
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Serge Lepage
Author Affiliation
Cardiology Division, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec. serge.lepage@USherbrooke.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jul;24 Suppl B:6B-8B
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiotonic Agents - therapeutic use
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Heart Failure - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Hospital Costs
Hospitalization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - therapeutic use
Patient Readmission - economics - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Acute decompensated heart failure is the most common cause of hospitalization for patients older than 65 years of age. Although treatment of this condition has improved over the past two decades, the specific approach to patients in the acute setting has not evolved in the same way. A patient facing acute decompensation is experiencing a serious medical condition that is associated with a poor prognosis. In addition, acute decompensated heart failure results in significant costs to the health care system. Significant morbidity and mortality are associated with patients who are readmitted within a year of the first hospitalization. Because of this important problem, further research on improving the prognosis for this condition is warranted. The present article will focus on the risk factors associated with acute decompensation and the importance of this condition, both on prognosis and economics.
Notes
Cites: Rev Cardiovasc Med. 2003;4 Suppl 7:S21-3014668697
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Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2003 Mar 31;19(4):430-512704491
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 Jan;23(1):21-4517245481
PubMed ID
18629381 View in PubMed
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Acute decompensated heart failure: an introduction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156139
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jul;24 Suppl B:5B
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Eldon R Smith
Author Affiliation
Healthcare Sciences Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta. cjc@ucalgary.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jul;24 Suppl B:5B
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiotonic Agents - therapeutic use
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Heart Failure - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - therapeutic use
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Analysis
Notes
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 Jan;23(1):21-4517245481
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 Jan;22(1):23-4516450016
PubMed ID
18629380 View in PubMed
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Alternative magnetic field exposure metrics: relationship to TWA, appliance use, and demographic characteristics of children in a leukemia survival study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192274
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 2001 Dec;22(8):574-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
D E Foliart
R N Iriye
K J Tarr
J M Silva
R. Kavet
K L Ebi
Author Affiliation
Public Health Institute, Berkeley, California, USA. publichealth@msn.com
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 2001 Dec;22(8):574-80
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Demography
Electronics - instrumentation
Humans
Infant
Magnetics - adverse effects
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma - etiology - mortality
Prospective Studies
Survival Analysis
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The ongoing Childhood Leukemia Survival Study is examining the possible association between magnetic field exposure and survival of children with newly diagnosed acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). We report the results of the first year 24 h personal magnetic field monitoring for 356 US and Canadian children by time weighted average TWA and alternative exposure metrics. The mean TWA of 0.12 microT was similar to earlier personal exposure studies involving children. A high correlation was found between 24 h TWA and alternative metrics: 12 h day TWA, 12 night TWA, geometric mean, 95th percentile value, percentage time over 0.2 and 0.3 microT, and an estimate of field stability (Constant Field Metric). Two measures of field intermittency, rate of change metric (RCM) and standardized rate of change metric (RCMS), were not highly correlated with TWA. The strongest predictor of TWA was location of residence, with highest TWAs associated with urban areas. Residence in an apartment, lower paternal educational level, and residential mobility were also associated with higher TWAs. There were no significant differences in the appliance use patterns of children with higher TWA values. Children with the highest field intermittency (high RCM) were more likely to sit within 3 feet of a video game attached to the TV. Our results suggest that 24 h TWA is a representative metric for certain patterns of exposure, but is not highly correlated with two metrics that estimate field intermittency.
PubMed ID
11748675 View in PubMed
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Amiodarone and apparently unimproved survival from in-hospital cardiac arrest: association, causation or a mix of both?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170382
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 Mar 1;22(3):203-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2006
Author
Riyad B Abu-Laban
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 Mar 1;22(3):203-4
Date
Mar-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amiodarone - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Emergency medical services
Heart Arrest - drug therapy - etiology - mortality
Hospitals
Humans
Injections, Intravenous
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Resuscitation
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Tachycardia - complications - drug therapy - mortality
Notes
Cites: Circulation. 2000 Aug 22;102(8 Suppl):I86-910966665
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Mar 21;346(12):884-9011907287
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Jan 8;350(2):179-8114711918
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2004 Sep;20(11):1081-9015457303
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 Sep 16;341(12):871-810486418
Comment On: Can J Cardiol. 2006 Mar 1;22(3):199-20216520848
PubMed ID
16520849 View in PubMed
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Analysis of mortality among Canadian nuclear power industry workers after chronic low-dose exposure to ionizing radiation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179974
Source
Radiat Res. 2004 Jun;161(6):633-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Lydia B Zablotska
J Patrick Ashmore
Geoffrey R Howe
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA. lbz7@columbia.edu
Source
Radiat Res. 2004 Jun;161(6):633-41
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Female
Humans
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - mortality
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Power Plants - statistics & numerical data
Radiation Dosage
Radiation, Ionizing
Radiometry - methods
Registries
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Studies of radiation-associated risks among workers chronically exposed to low doses of radiation are important, both to estimate risks directly and to assess the adequacy of extrapolations of risk estimates from high-dose studies. This paper presents results based on a cohort of 45,468 nuclear power industry workers from the Canadian National Dose Registry monitored for more than 1 year for chronic low-dose whole-body ionizing radiation exposures sometime between 1957 and 1994 (mean duration of monitoring = 7.4 years, mean cumulative equivalent dose = 13.5 mSv). The excess relative risks for leukemia [excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)] and for all solid cancers were 52.5 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.205, 291] and 2.80 (95% CI: -0.038, 7.13) per sievert, respectively, both associations having P values close to 0.05. Relative risks by dose categories increased monotonically for leukemia excluding CLL but were less consistent for all solid cancers combined. Although the point estimates are higher than those found in other studies of whole-body irradiation, the difference could well be due to chance. Further follow-up of this cohort or the combination of results from multiple worker studies will produce more stable estimates and thus complement the risk estimates from higher-dose studies.
PubMed ID
15161357 View in PubMed
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An empirical evaluation of period survival analysis using data from the Canadian Cancer Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173345
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2006 Mar;16(3):191-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Larry F Ellison
Author Affiliation
Health Statistics Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ont., Canada. larry.ellison@statcan.ca
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2006 Mar;16(3):191-6
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Empirical Research
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Prognosis
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Registries
Survival Analysis
Abstract
To provide an empirical evaluation of the performance of period analysis in comparison to traditional methods of survival analysis for predicting future 5-year cancer survival using data from the Canadian Cancer Registry.
5-year relative survival estimates were derived by period and traditional methods of analysis using data available at the conclusion of 1997. The extent to which these estimates agreed with survival later observed for cancer cases diagnosed in 1997 was quantified by calculating the squared difference of the estimate to the corresponding relative survival ratio actually observed.
Period analysis was observed to be superior to, or comparable with, cohort analysis in predicting the average 5-year relative survival observed later for virtually all individual cancer sites studied. The improvement in survival estimation was most pronounced for prostate cancer. Where period estimates did not match the eventually observed value, they were predominantly on the lower side. Complete analysis estimates were generally observed to be in between the cohort and period values.
The period method of survival analysis provides more up-to-date estimates of 5-year survival than do traditional cohort-based methods.
PubMed ID
16099673 View in PubMed
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Angiography and revascularization in patients with heart failure following fibrinolytic therapy for ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176663
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2005 Jan 15;95(2):228-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-2005
Author
Amir Kashani
C Michael Gibson
Sabina A Murphy
Marc S Sabatine
David A Morrow
Elliott M Antman
Robert P Giugliano
Author Affiliation
Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, New York, USA.
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2005 Jan 15;95(2):228-33
Date
Jan-15-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Coronary Angiography - utilization
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Heart Failure - epidemiology - etiology - mortality - surgery
Humans
Male
Myocardial Infarction - complications - drug therapy
Myocardial Revascularization - utilization
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Plasminogen Activators - administration & dosage
Survival Analysis
Thrombolytic Therapy
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
We evaluated the use of coronary angiography and clinical outcomes among patients who had heart failure and were enrolled in the Intravenous Novel Plasminogen Activator (NPA) for the Treatment of Infarcting Myocardium Early study, a large international trial of fibrinolytic therapy in ST-elevation myocardial infarction.
PubMed ID
15642555 View in PubMed
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Apolipoprotein E-polymorphism, frailty and mortality in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158869
Source
J Cell Mol Med. 2008 Dec;12(6B):2754-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Kenneth Rockwood
Bassam Nassar
Arnold Mitnitski
Author Affiliation
Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Kenneth.Rockwood@Dal.Ca
Source
J Cell Mol Med. 2008 Dec;12(6B):2754-61
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged, 80 and over
Alleles
Apolipoproteins E - genetics
Canada - epidemiology
Cognition
Female
Frail Elderly
Genotype
Humans
Male
Mortality
Polymorphism, Genetic
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Although apolipoprotein E (ApoE) polymorphism is associated with variable risks of several illnesses, and with mortality, no persuasive relationship has been demonstrated with frailty. Here, the clinical examination cohort (n=1452 older adults, aged 70+ years at baseline) of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging was evaluated, with 5-year follow-up data. Frailty was defined using both the phenotypic definition from the Cardiovascular Health Study (Frailty-CHS) and the 'Frailty Index', from which age-specific trajectories of deficit accumulation can be estimated. In age-sex adjusted analyses, people with ApoE 4 allele had a higher risk of death (hazard ratio [HR]=1.20; 95% confidence interval: 1.01-1.45), but this relationship was not significant when adjusted for cognitive impairment (1.06; 95% confidence interval: 0.88-1.27). There was no association between frailty and ApoE polymorphism, defined in age-sex adjusted models either as Frailty-CHS (ApoE4 HR 1.17; 95% confidence interval: 0.98-1.40, frailty HR 1.37; 95% confidence interval: 1.28-1.46) or by the Frailty Index (ApoE4 HR 1.07; 95% confidence interval: 0.90-1.29, frailty HR 35.3; 95% confidence interval: 20.4-61.1). The data do not support an association between ApoE polymorphism and frailty. This result did not depend on how frailty was defined.
PubMed ID
18266965 View in PubMed
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199 records – page 1 of 20.