Skip header and navigation

Refine By

3462 records – page 1 of 347.

Period estimates of cancer patient survival are more up-to-date than complete estimates even at comparable levels of precision.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169208
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2006 Jun;59(6):570-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Hermann Brenner
Timo Hakulinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, German Center for Research on Aging, Bergheimer Strasse 20, D-69115 Heidelberg, Germany. h.brenner@dkfz-heidelberg.de
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2006 Jun;59(6):570-5
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Neoplasms - mortality
Prognosis
Registries
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Abstract
Period analysis provides more up-to-date estimates of cancer patient survival than traditional methods, but there is a trade-off between up-to-dateness and precision. Our objective was to compare the performance of period and complete analysis in terms of up-to-dateness and precision of survival estimates.
Five-year relative survival data actually observed for patients diagnosed with 1 of 20 common forms of cancer in Finland in 36 overlapping 5-year periods between 1958-1962 and 1993-1997 were compared with period estimates and various variants of complete estimates of 5-year relative survival potentially available during these periods.
At comparable levels of up-to-dateness, survival estimates from period analysis were more precise than survival estimates from complete analysis. At comparable levels of precision, period analysis provided more up-to-date survival estimates than did complete analysis.
These results further encourage more widespread use of period analysis as a standard tool for up-to-date monitoring of cancer patient survival by population-based cancer registries.
PubMed ID
16713519 View in PubMed
Less detail

Danish study links cancer survival to income and education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92416
Source
BMJ. 2008;337:a1340
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008

Survival statistics gone awry: pancreatic cancer, a case in point.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18951
Source
J Clin Gastroenterol. 2002 Aug;35(2):180-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Birgir Gudjonsson
Author Affiliation
Medical Clinic, Reykjavík, Iceland. bghav@mmedia.is
Source
J Clin Gastroenterol. 2002 Aug;35(2):180-4
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Pancreatic Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Abstract
Resections for pancreatic cancer have been performed for 65 years, with approximately 20,000 reported. A number of authors claim a 5-year survival rate of 30% to 58%. Review of the literature reveals only about 1,200 5-year survivors; however, 10 times as many individual resected survivors have been reported (in various countries), and nonresected survivors are overlooked. This high survival percentage is obtained by reducing the subset on which calculations are based and by using methods such as the Kaplan-Meier method, which produces higher figures as increasing numbers of patients are lost to follow-up. After adjustments, hardly more than 350 resected survivors could be found. Revision of statistical methods is urgently needed.
PubMed ID
12172365 View in PubMed
Less detail

No change in survival after cardiac arrest in 2007 and 2012 at a hospital in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268941
Source
Resuscitation. 2015 Feb;87:e11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015

Implementing a novel movement-based approach to inferring parturition and neonate caribou calf survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290835
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(2):e0192204
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Maegwin Bonar
E Hance Ellington
Keith P Lewis
Eric Vander Wal
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(2):e0192204
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Female
Newfoundland and Labrador
Parturition
Pregnancy
Reindeer
Survival Analysis
Abstract
In ungulates, parturition is correlated with a reduction in movement rate. With advances in movement-based technologies comes an opportunity to develop new techniques to assess reproduction in wild ungulates that are less invasive and reduce biases. DeMars et al. (2013, Ecology and Evolution 3:4149-4160) proposed two promising new methods (individual- and population-based; the DeMars model) that use GPS inter-fix step length of adult female caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) to infer parturition and neonate survival. Our objective was to apply the DeMars model to caribou populations that may violate model assumptions for retrospective analysis of parturition and calf survival. We extended the use of the DeMars model after assigning parturition and calf mortality status by examining herd-wide distributions of parturition date, calf mortality date, and survival. We used the DeMars model to estimate parturition and calf mortality events and compared them with the known parturition and calf mortality events from collared adult females (n = 19). We also used the DeMars model to estimate parturition and calf mortality events for collared female caribou with unknown parturition and calf mortality events (n = 43) and instead derived herd-wide estimates of calf survival as well as distributions of parturition and calf mortality dates and compared them to herd-wide estimates generated from calves fitted with VHF collars (n = 134). For our data, the individual-based method was effective at predicting calf mortality, but was not effective at predicting parturition. The population-based method was more effective at predicting parturition but was not effective at predicting calf mortality. At the herd-level, the predicted distributions of parturition date from both methods differed from each other and from the distribution derived from the parturition dates of VHF-collared calves (log-ranked test: ?2 = 40.5, df = 2, p
Notes
Cites: Oecologia. 2000 May;123(3):364-374 PMID 28308591
Cites: Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2010 Jul 27;365(1550):2187-200 PMID 20566496
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2012 Nov 7;279(1746):4481-8 PMID 22951736
Cites: PLoS One. 2011 Jan 26;6(1):e14597 PMID 21297866
Cites: Ecology. 2015 Jul;96(7):1741-53 PMID 26378296
Cites: Science. 2015 Jun 12;348(6240):aaa2478 PMID 26068858
Cites: Ecol Evol. 2013 Oct;3(12):4149-60 PMID 24324866
PubMed ID
29466451 View in PubMed
Less detail

Up-to-date long-term survival of cancer patients: an evaluation of period analysis on Swedish Cancer Registry data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17671
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2004 Jun;40(9):1361-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Mats Talbäck
Magnus Stenbeck
Måns Rosén
Author Affiliation
The Swedish Cancer Registry, Centre for Epidemiology, The National Board of Health and Welfare, SE-106 30 Stockholm, Sweden. mats.talback@sos.se
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2004 Jun;40(9):1361-72
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Humans
Neoplasms - mortality
Registries
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The natural development of cancers as well as the measures to fight the disease are often long processes that require decades of follow up. Available information on long-term survival will thus often appear outdated and irrelevant. A few years ago, period-survival analysis was proposed as a means to obtain more up-to-date information on long-term cancer survival. This article assesses period and conventional cohort-based survival analyses on their ability to predict future survival. Based on historical data from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Registry 5-, 10- and 15-year relative survival actually observed for patients diagnosed at one particular point in time are compared to the most recent period and cohort-based survival estimates available at that point in time. The study shows that period analysis can, in most cases, be used to provide more up-to-date long-term estimates of cancer survival. Period analysis reduces the time lag of the survival estimates by some 5-10 years for all cancers combined and especially affects the survival estimates for small intestine carcinoids, meningioma and intracranial neurinoma of the brain, non-seminoma testicular cancer, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and Hodgkin's lymphoma.
PubMed ID
15177496 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The morbidity of population on the territories of the Sibirsky federal okrug].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124204
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2011 Nov-Dec;(6):7-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
A I Babenko
A L Tomchuk
Iu I Bravve
E A Babenko
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2011 Nov-Dec;(6):7-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Services Research
Humans
Morbidity - trends
Mortality - trends
Russia - epidemiology
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The comparative analysis of morbidity of population of the Sibirsky federal okrug was implemented on the territories with presence/absence of the regional diagnostic center The sampling of eleven statistical materials was used. It is established that higher level of the diagnostics using special examination techniques in the diagnostic centers permits to increase the detect of pathology (oncologic included) in population and to assess adequately the need in important curative rehabilitating technologies.
PubMed ID
22611976 View in PubMed
Less detail

Estimating demographic parameters using a combination of known-fate and open N-mixture models.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269006
Source
Ecology. 2015 Oct;96(10):2583-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Joshua H Schmidt
Devin S Johnson
Mark S Lindberg
Layne G Adams
Source
Ecology. 2015 Oct;96(10):2583-9
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Models, Biological
Population Dynamics
Survival Analysis
Telemetry
Time Factors
Wolves - physiology
Abstract
Accurate estimates of demographic parameters are required to infer appropriate ecological relationships and inform management actions. Known-fate data from marked individuals are commonly used to estimate survival rates, whereas N-mixture models use count data from unmarked individuals to estimate multiple demographic parameters. However, a joint approach combining the strengths of both analytical tools has not been developed. Here we develop an integrated model combining known-fate and open N-mixture models, allowing the estimation of detection probability, recruitment, and the joint estimation of survival. We demonstrate our approach through both simulations and an applied example using four years of known-fate and pack count data for wolves (Canis lupus). Simulation results indicated that the integrated model reliably recovered parameters with no evidence of bias, and survival estimates were more precise under the joint model. Results from the applied example indicated that the marked sample of wolves was biased toward individuals with higher apparent survival rates than the unmarked pack mates, suggesting that joint estimates may be more representative of the overall population. Our integrated model is a practical approach for reducing bias while increasing precision and the amount of information gained from mark-resight data sets. We provide implementations in both the BUGS language and an R package.
PubMed ID
26649379 View in PubMed
Less detail

Temporal trends in diabetes incidence and prevalence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209240
Source
Diabetes Care. 1997 Mar;20(3):460-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
C. Leibson
L J Milton
P J Palumbo
Source
Diabetes Care. 1997 Mar;20(3):460-2
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
Incidence
Manitoba - epidemiology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Notes
Comment On: Diabetes Care. 1996 Aug;19(8):807-118842595
PubMed ID
9051407 View in PubMed
Less detail

3462 records – page 1 of 347.