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A 3-year follow-up study of preformed beta-quartz glass-ceramic insert restorations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195752
Source
Quintessence Int. 2000 Jan;31(1):25-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2000
Author
G. Sjögren
S O Hedlund
C. Jonsson
A. Sandström
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Materials Science, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden. Goran.Sjogren@odont.umu.se
Source
Quintessence Int. 2000 Jan;31(1):25-31
Date
Jan-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bicuspid
Ceramics - chemistry
Color
Dental Caries - classification
Dental Marginal Adaptation
Dental Plaque - classification
Dental Restoration Failure
Dental Restoration, Permanent - classification
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - classification
Glass - chemistry
Humans
Inlays - classification
Male
Middle Aged
Molar
Quartz - chemistry
Surface Properties
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of preformed beta-quartz glass-ceramic insert restorations.
Nine Class I and 30 Class II beta-quartz glass-ceramic insert restorations were placed in 16 patients who were seen regularly by personnel at Umeå University Dental School. The California Dental Association criteria were used to evaluate the restorations at baseline, 6 months, and 1, 2, and 3 years after luting. The occurrence of postoperative sensitivity, the time taken to manufacture each restoration, and certain periodontal conditions were also evaluated.
Sixty-nine percent of the restorations were rated satisfactory at the 3-year examination. During the follow-up period, 4 became loose and 7 were fractured or had flaking surfaces. Caries was registered in connection with 1 restoration. Excellent ratings were obtained for marginal integrity, anatomic form, surface, and color in 62%, 84%, 32%, and 44% of the restorations, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the occurrence of plaque and bleeding on probing in comparison with the controls. The mean overall time for placement was 38 minutes. The estimated survival rate (Kaplan-Meier) was 59% after 3.5 years.
The quality of the beta-quartz glass-ceramic restorations in the present study was inferior to that presented in most earlier studies of ceramic or resin composite posterior restorations placed in patients treated at university clinics. Both the technique and the beta-quartz glass-ceramic inserts have to be evaluated in more long-term studies to assess the possibility of their serving as an alternative restorative technique.
PubMed ID
11203902 View in PubMed
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5th Canadian Melanoma Conference: research frontiers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133428
Source
Expert Rev Anticancer Ther. 2011 Jun;11(6):845-8
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Léon C van Kempen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, McGill University and Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, 3755 Cote Ste-Catherine, Montréal, QC, H3T 1E2, Canada. leon.vankempen@mcgill.ca
Source
Expert Rev Anticancer Ther. 2011 Jun;11(6):845-8
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Antineoplastic Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Canada
Disease Progression
Drug Delivery Systems
Early Detection of Cancer
Humans
Melanoma - pathology - therapy
Neoplasm Metastasis
Skin Neoplasms - pathology - therapy
Survival
Abstract
The prospects for the treatment of metastatic melanoma are improving. Whereas previous scientific meetings dedicated to the treatment of metastatic melanoma patients were overshadowed by our inability to improve overall survival or lengthen the time to progression, the results presented at the most recent meetings are hopeful. The 5th Canadian Melanoma Conference held on 24-27 February in Banff (AB, Canada) was nothing short of optimistic. This year's meeting was divided into three themes: basic science and pathology, dermatology and surgery, and immunology and systemic treatment. In addition, dermoscopy case studies were presented, and Hoffmann la Roche sponsored a symposium on the evaluation of treatment for advanced melanoma. It underscored the importance of early detection and patient stratification, based upon the molecular profile of the tumor, in order to optimize the response to targeted therapy.
PubMed ID
21707280 View in PubMed
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5-year outcome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117830
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2013 Jan 29;61(4):413-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-29-2013
Author
Stefan Toggweiler
Karin H Humphries
May Lee
Ronald K Binder
Robert R Moss
Melanie Freeman
Jian Ye
Anson Cheung
David A Wood
John G Webb
Author Affiliation
St. Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2013 Jan 29;61(4):413-9
Date
Jan-29-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Valve - physiopathology - surgery - ultrasonography
Aortic Valve Stenosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - surgery
Canada - epidemiology
Equipment Failure Analysis - statistics & numerical data
Female
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - methods - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Postoperative Period
Prognosis
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure - etiology
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Rate
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the 5-year outcome following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).
Little is known about long-term outcomes following TAVI.
The 5-year outcomes following successful TAVI with a balloon-expandable valve were evaluated in 88 patients. Patients who died within 30 days after TAVI were excluded.
Mean aortic valve gradient decreased from 46 ± 18 mm Hg to 10 ± 4.5 mm Hg after TAVI and 11.8 ± 5.7 mm Hg at 5 years (p for post-TAVI trend = 0.06). Mean aortic valve area increased from 0.62 ± 0.17 cm(2) to 1.67 ± 0.41 cm(2) after TAVI and 1.40 ± 0.25 cm(2) at 5 years (p for post-TAVI trend
PubMed ID
23265333 View in PubMed
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8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine: a new potential independent prognostic factor in breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97933
Source
Br J Cancer. 2010 Mar 16;102(6):1018-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-16-2010
Author
H. Sova
A. Jukkola-Vuorinen
U. Puistola
S. Kauppila
P. Karihtala
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Oulu University Hospital, Finland. henrijuh@mail.student.oulu.fi
Source
Br J Cancer. 2010 Mar 16;102(6):1018-23
Date
Mar-16-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - metabolism - mortality - pathology
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast - diagnosis - metabolism - mortality - pathology
Deoxyguanosine - analogs & derivatives - blood - metabolism
Female
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Prognosis
Survival Analysis
Tumor Markers, Biological - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
BACKGROUND: 8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) is the commonly used marker of oxidative stress-derived DNA damage. 8-OxodG formation is regulated by local antioxidant capacity and DNA repair enzyme activity. Earlier studies have reported contradictory data on the function of 8-oxodG as a prognostic factor in different cancer types. METHODS: We assessed pre-operative serum 8-oxodG levels with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in a well-defined series of 173 breast cancer patients. 8-OxodG expression in the nuclei of cancer cells from 150 of these patients was examined by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: The serum 8-oxodG levels and immunohistochemical 8-oxodG expression were in concordance with each other (P
PubMed ID
20179711 View in PubMed
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A 10 mg warfarin initiation nomogram is safe and effective in outpatients starting oral anticoagulant therapy for venous thromboembolism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153058
Source
Thromb Res. 2009 Jul;124(3):275-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Katherine Monkman
Alejandro Lazo-Langner
Michael J Kovacs
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Thromb Res. 2009 Jul;124(3):275-80
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care - methods
Anticoagulants - administration & dosage
Comorbidity
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Hemorrhage - mortality
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
Venous Thromboembolism - drug therapy - mortality
Warfarin - administration & dosage
Young Adult
Abstract
The optimal means of initiating warfarin therapy for acute venous thromboembolism in the outpatient setting remains controversial. We have previously demonstrated the efficacy of a 10 mg initiation nomogram in a randomized controlled trial; however, some clinicians remain reluctant to use this nomogram due to a fear of potential increased bleeding. To review the safety and efficacy of a 10 mg warfarin nomogram we conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients prospectively treated for venous thromboembolism according to a 10 mg nomogram in an outpatient thrombosis clinic. All patients received standard treatment with low molecular weight heparin for 5 to 7 days and warfarin for at least 3 months. Four-hundred and fourteen patients were included in the analysis, of whom 295 (71%) fully adhered to the nomogram. In the whole cohort, 8 patients (1.9%) experienced recurrent thrombosis, 4 (0.97%) suffered a major bleeding event, and 3 (0.72%) suffered a minor bleeding event. There were no deaths related to thrombosis or bleeding. Four patients (0.97%) died from unrelated causes. Twenty-two (5.3%) patients experienced an INR > or =5.0 in the first 8 days of therapy, and none of these patients experienced a bleeding event. Eighty-four percent of patients achieved a therapeutic INR by day 5. In outpatients, a 10 mg nomogram results in timely achievement of a therapeutic INR with an acceptable incidence of bleeding and recurrent thromboembolism.
PubMed ID
19155056 View in PubMed
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The 10-year COPD Programme in Finland: effects on quality of diagnosis, smoking, prevalence, hospital admissions and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135938
Source
Prim Care Respir J. 2011 Jun;20(2):178-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Vuokko L Kinnula
Tuula Vasankari
Eva Kontula
Anssi Sovijarvi
Olli Saynajakangas
Anne Pietinalho
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. vuokko.kinnula@helsinki.fi
Source
Prim Care Respir J. 2011 Jun;20(2):178-83
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Diagnostic Techniques, Respiratory System - standards
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Program Evaluation - methods
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Survival Rate - trends
Young Adult
Abstract
The Finnish National Programme for Chronic Bronchitis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) 1998-2007 was set up to reduce the prevalence of COPD, improve COPD diagnosis and care, reduce the number of moderate to severe cases of the disease, and reduce hospitalisations and treatment costs due to COPD. Over 900 events for 25,000 participating healthcare workers were arranged. The major strengths of this programme included multidisciplinary strategies and web-based guidelines in nearly all primary health care centres around the country.
Data from national registries, epidemiological studies and questionnaires were used to measure whether the goals had been reached.
The prevalence of COPD remained unchanged. Smoking decreased in males from 30% to 26% (p
Notes
Comment In: Prim Care Respir J. 2011 Jun;20(2):109-1021603847
PubMed ID
21431275 View in PubMed
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10-year experience with I-125 prostate brachytherapy at the Princess Margaret Hospital: results for 1,100 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141809
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2011 Aug 1;80(5):1323-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2011
Author
Juanita Crook
Jette Borg
Andrew Evans
Ants Toi
E P Saibishkumar
Sharon Fung
Clement Ma
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. jcrook@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2011 Aug 1;80(5):1323-9
Date
Aug-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - blood - mortality - pathology - radiotherapy
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Brachytherapy - adverse effects - methods
Disease-Free Survival
Humans
Iodine Radioisotopes - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Neoadjuvant Therapy - methods
Neoplasm Staging
Ontario
Penile Erection - physiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Prostate
Prostate-Specific Antigen - blood
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - mortality - pathology - radiotherapy
Radiotherapy Dosage
Urination Disorders - drug therapy
Abstract
To report outcomes for 1,111 men treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy (BT) at a single institution.
A total of 1,111 men (median age, 63) were treated with iodine-125 prostate BT for low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer between March 1999 and November 2008. Median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 5.4 ng/ml (range, 0.9-26.1). T stage was T1c in 66% and T2 in 34% of patients. Gleason score was 6 in 90.1% and 7 or 8 in 9.9% of patients. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (2-6 months course) was used in 10.1% of patients and combined external radiotherapy (45 Gy) with BT (110 Gy) in 4.1% (n = 46) of patients. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards were used to determine predictors of failure.
Median follow-up was 42 months (range, 6-114), but for biochemical freedom from relapse, a minimum PSA test follow-up of 30 months was required (median 54; n = 776). There were 27 failures, yielding an actuarial 7-year disease-free survival rate of 95.2% (96 at risk beyond 84 months). All failures underwent repeat 12-core transrectal ultrasound -guided biopsies, confirming 8 local failures. On multivariate analysis, Gleason score was the only independent predictor of failure (p = 0.001; hazard ratio, 4.8 (1.9-12.4). Median International Prostate Symptom score from 12 to 108 months ranged between 3 and 9. Of the men reporting baseline potency, 82.8% retained satisfactory erectile function beyond 5 years.
Iodine-125 prostate BT is a highly effective treatment option for favorable- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer and is associated with maintenance of good urinary and erectile functions.
PubMed ID
20675072 View in PubMed
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A 10-year retrospective study of interhospital patient transport using inhaled nitric oxide in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269280
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2015 May;59(5):648-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
C. Buskop
P P Bredmose
M. Sandberg
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2015 May;59(5):648-53
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Critical Care
Equipment Failure - statistics & numerical data
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Nitric Oxide - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Norway
Respiratory Insufficiency - mortality - therapy
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Tertiary Care Centers
Transportation of Patients
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Anaesthesiologists from Oslo University Hospital have transported patients with severe oxygenation failure with inhaled nitric oxide (usually 20?ppm) from other hospitals to a tertiary care centre since 2002 in an effort to reduce the number of patients that otherwise would require transport with ongoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the patient safety during transport with inhaled nitric oxide.
All patient transports with ongoing nitric oxide treatment undertaken from 2003 to 2012 were identified in the transport database. The frequency of adverse events and their impact on patient safety were studied in addition to response to inhaled nitric oxide and adjusted intensive care treatment and time aspects of the transports. Information about in-hospital treatment and survival were extracted from the hospital patient records.
Adverse events were recorded in 12 of the 104 transports. Seven of the adverse events were due to malfunctioning technical equipment, three were related to medication other than the inhaled nitric oxide and two were related to ventilation. No adverse events resulted in permanent negative patient consequences or in discontinuation of the transport. Out of 104 patients, 79 responded to treatment with inhaled nitric oxide and other treatment changes by an increase in oxygen saturation of more than 5%. The 30-day mortality was 27% in the group transported with inhaled nitric oxide.
Transporting patients on inhaled nitric oxide is an alternative in selected patients who would otherwise require extracorporeal membrane oxygenation during transport.
PubMed ID
25782015 View in PubMed
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[10-year survival after lung resection for lung cancer]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23455
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Dec 5;156(49):7357-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-5-1994
Author
M. Krasnik
K. Høier-Madsen
J. Sparup
Author Affiliation
Thoraxkirurgisk afdeling R, Amtssygehuset i Gentofte.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Dec 5;156(49):7357-60
Date
Dec-5-1994
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - mortality - surgery
Adult
Aged
Carcinoma, Bronchogenic - mortality - surgery
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - mortality - surgery
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonectomy
Postoperative Complications - mortality
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Survival Rate
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to investigate the prognosis for patients treated for lung cancer by operative resection in the Copenhagen area. Ninety-four consecutively operated patients were followed prospectively for ten years. Seventy-one percent of the patients had been operated radically. The five- and ten-year survival for this group was respectively 46 and 27%. All non-radically operated patients were dead after four years. The postoperative mortality and long-term survival correspond to international results. Type of cancer and mode of operation did not affect survival in the radically operated patients.
PubMed ID
7801397 View in PubMed
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10-year survival and quality of life in patients with high-risk pN0 prostate cancer following definitive radiotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94068
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2007 Nov 15;69(4):1074-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2007
Author
Berg Arne
Lilleby Wolfgang
Bruland Oyvind Sverre
Fosså Sophie Dorothea
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. arne.berg@radiumhospitalet.no
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2007 Nov 15;69(4):1074-83
Date
Nov-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Case-Control Studies
Disease Progression
Erectile Dysfunction - physiopathology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Norway
Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - radiotherapy
Quality of Life
Radiotherapy, Conformal
Survival Analysis
Urination Disorders - physiopathology
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate long-term overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), clinical progression-free survival (cPFS), and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) following definitive radiotherapy (RT) given to T(1-4p)N(0)M(0) prostate cancer patients provided by a single institution between 1989 and 1996. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We assessed outcome among 203 patients who had completed three-dimensional conformal RT (66 Gy) without hormone treatment and in whom staging by lymphadenectomy had been performed. OS was compared with an age-matched control group from the general population. A cross-sectional, self-report survey of HRQoL was performed among surviving patients. RESULTS: Median observation time was 10 years (range, 1-16 years). Eighty-one percent had high-risk tumors defined as T(3-4) or Gleason score (GS) > or =7B (4+3). Among these, 10-year OS, CSS, and cPFS rates were 52%, 66%, and 39%, respectively. The corresponding fractions in low-risk patients (T(1-2) and GS or =7B.
PubMed ID
17703896 View in PubMed
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8773 records – page 1 of 878.