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More questions regarding the Danish health puzzle?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292214
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 12; 45(8):809-810
Publication Type
Journal Article
Comment
Date
12-2017
Author
Gabriel Gulis
Maja Bertram
Gabriele Berg-Beckhoff
Eva Ladekjær Larsen
Pernille Tanggaard Andersen
Author Affiliation
Unit for Health Promotion Research, University of Southern Denmark, Esbjerg, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 12; 45(8):809-810
Date
12-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Comment
Keywords
Denmark
Surveys and Questionnaires
Notes
CommentOn: Scand J Public Health. 2017 Dec;45(8):799-808 PMID 28381132
PubMed ID
29052460 View in PubMed
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The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ): Factor Structure and Gender Equivalence in Norwegian Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281568
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(5):e0152202
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Tormod Bøe
Mari Hysing
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Kyrre Breivik
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(5):e0152202
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Although frequently used with older adolescents, few studies of the factor structure, internal consistency and gender equivalence of the SDQ exists for this age group, with inconsistent findings. In the present study, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to evaluate the five-factor structure of the SDQ in a population sample of 10,254 16-18 year-olds from the youth@hordaland study. Measurement invariance across gender was assessed using multigroup CFA. A modestly modified five-factor solution fitted the data acceptably, accounting for one cross loading and some local dependencies. Importantly, partial measurement non-invariance was identified, with differential item functioning in eight items, and higher correlations between emotional and conduct problems for boys compared to girls. Implications for use clinically and in research are discussed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27138259 View in PubMed
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Patient participation in patient safety still missing: Patient safety experts' views.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282643
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2016 Oct;22(5):461-469
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Merja Sahlström
Pirjo Partanen
Cheryl Rathert
Hannele Turunen
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2016 Oct;22(5):461-469
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland
Humans
Patient Participation
Patient Safety
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The aim of this study was to elicit patient safety experts' views of patient participation in promoting patient safety. Data were collected between September and December in 2014 via an electronic semi-structured questionnaire and interviews with Finnish patient safety experts (n?=?21), then analysed using inductive content analysis. Patient safety experts regarded patients as having a crucial role in promoting patient safety. They generally deemed the level of patient safety as 'acceptable' in their organizations, but reported that patient participation in their own safety varied, and did not always meet national standards. Management of patient safety incidents differed between organizations. Experts also suggested that patient safety training should be increased in both basic and continuing education programmes for healthcare professionals. Patient participation in patient safety is still lacking in clinical practice and systematic actions are needed to create a safety culture in which patients are seen as equal partners in the promotion of high-quality and safe care.
PubMed ID
27507224 View in PubMed
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Digital questionnaire platform in the Danish Blood Donor Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280970
Source
Comput Methods Programs Biomed. 2016 Oct;135:101-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
K S Burgdorf
N. Felsted
S. Mikkelsen
M H Nielsen
L W Thørner
O B Pedersen
E. Sørensen
K R Nielsen
M T Bruun
T. Werge
C. Erikstrup
T. Hansen
H. Ullum
Source
Comput Methods Programs Biomed. 2016 Oct;135:101-4
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Donors
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The Danish Blood Donor Study (DBDS) is a prospective, population-based study and biobank. Since 2010, 100,000 Danish blood donors have been included in the study. Prior to July 2015 all participating donors had to complete a paper-based questionnaire. Here we describe the establishment of a digital tablet-based questionnaire platform implemented in blood bank sites across Denmark.
The digital questionnaire was developed using the open source survey software tool LimeSurvey. The participants accesses the questionnaire online with a standard SSL encrypted HTTP connection using their personal civil registration numbers. The questionnaire is placed at a front-end web server and a collection server retrieves the completed questionnaires. Data from blood samples, register data, genetic data and verification of signed informed consent are then transferred to and merged with the questionnaire data in the DBDS database.
The digital platform enables personalized questionnaires, presenting only questions relevant to the specific donor by hiding unneeded follow-up questions on screening question results. New versions of questionnaires are immediately available at all blood collection facilities when new projects are initiated.
The digital platform is a faster, cost-effective and more flexible solution to collect valid data from participating donors compared to paper-based questionnaires. The overall system can be used around the world by the use of Internet connection, but the level of security depends on the sensitivity of the data to be collected.
PubMed ID
27586483 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2016 Dec;136(23-24):1968-1969
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Øystein Buer
Mary Kalfoss
Lars Weisæth
Bjørn Bendz
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2016 Dec;136(23-24):1968-1969
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Critical Illness
Death
Humans
Norway
Surveys and Questionnaires
Translations
PubMed ID
28004543 View in PubMed
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Health Professionals' Expanding eHealth Competences for Supporting Patients' Self-Management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292325
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2018; 247:181-185
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
Sari Kujala
Elina Rajalahti
Tarja Heponiemi
Pirjo Hilama
Author Affiliation
Aalto University, Department of Computer Science, Finland.
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2018; 247:181-185
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Finland
Health Personnel
Humans
Self-Management
Surveys and Questionnaires
Telemedicine
Abstract
An increasing number of new eHealth services that support patients' self-management has changed health professionals' work and has created a need for a new eHealth competence. In this study, we evaluated the health professionals' eHealth competences and training needs in a public health organization in Finland. The target organization's goal was to increase the number of eHealth services provided to patients, and health professionals and their competences were seen as critical for the adoption of services. Data was collected through an online survey of 701 health professionals working in the target organization. Professionals perceived their basic computer skills as good and they were mostly willing to use eHealth services in patient work. However, health professionals need guidance, especially in their patient work in the new eHealth-enabled environment. They were less confident about their competence to motivate and advise patients to use eHealth services and how to communicate with patients using eHealth solutions. The results also imply that eHealth competence is not merely about an individual's skills but that organizations need to develop new working processes, work practices and distribution of work. We suggest that the training and support needs identified be considered in curricula and lifelong learning.
PubMed ID
29677947 View in PubMed
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Understanding the Promotion of Health Equity at the Local Level Requires Far More than Quantitative Analyses of Yes-No Survey Data Comment on "Health Promotion at Local Level in Norway: The Use of Public Health Coordinators and Health Overviews to Promote Fair Distribution Among Social Groups".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297377
Source
Int J Health Policy Manag. 2018 07 31; 7(10):964-967
Publication Type
Journal Article
Comment
Date
07-31-2018
Author
Dennis Raphael
Author Affiliation
School of Health Policy and Management, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Int J Health Policy Manag. 2018 07 31; 7(10):964-967
Date
07-31-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Comment
Keywords
Canada
Health equity
Health promotion
Humans
Norway
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Health promotion is a complex activity that requires analytic methods that recognize the contested nature of it definition, the barriers and supports for such activities, and its embeddedness within the politics of distribution. In this commentary I critique a recent study of municipalities' implementation of the Norwegian Public Health Act that employed analysis of "yes" or "no" responses from a large survey. I suggest the complexity of health promotion activities can be best captured through qualitative methods employing open-ended questions and thematic analysis of responses. To illustrate the limitations of the study, I provide details of how these methods were employed to study local public health unit (PHU) activity promoting health equity in Ontario, Canada.
Notes
CommentOn: Int J Health Policy Manag. 2018 Mar 14;7(9):807-817 PMID 30316229
PubMed ID
30316251 View in PubMed
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[The Analysis of Results of Sociological Survey Concerning Attitude to Palliative Care Support in the Russian Federation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297895
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2018 Jan; 26(1):32-35
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2018
Author
M E Kolomiytchenko
O S Karaieva
Author Affiliation
The Federal State Budget Scientific Institution "N.A. Semashko National Research Institute of Public Health", Moscow, 105064, Russia, niiskni@mail.ru.
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2018 Jan; 26(1):32-35
Date
Jan-2018
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Humans
Palliative Care
Russia
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The palliative care is a regulatory determined form of medical care in the Russian Federation since 2011. Until now, no complex analysis was applied to problems occurring during provision of the given form of care. The actual study provides analysis of the results of questionnaire survey of population of Russia with the purpose of determining public demand in development of palliative care (level of awareness, social cultural attitudes and main needs of population). And also, concepts of effective forms of its development. The article presents and considers data obtained during the study.
PubMed ID
29968992 View in PubMed
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Data quality and factor analysis of the Danish version of the Relationship Scale Questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285664
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(5):e0176810
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Christina Maar Andersen
Anette Fischer Pedersen
Anders Helles Carlsen
Frede Olesen
Peter Vedsted
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(5):e0176810
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The Relationship Scale Questionnaire (RSQ) is a widely-used measure of adult attachment, but whether the results obtained by the RSQ fit the attachment construct has only been examined to a limited extent.
The objectives of this study were to investigate the psychometric properties of the Danish translation of the RSQ and to test whether the results are consistent with the hypothesized model of attachment.
The study included two samples: 602 general practitioners and 611 cancer patients. The two samples were analyzed separately. Data quality was assessed by mean, median and missing values for each item, floor and ceiling effects, average inter-item correlations and Cronbach's a for each subscale. Test-retest was assessed by intra-class correlations among 76 general practitioners. A confirmatory factor analysis was conducted to establish evidence of the four proposed subscales. Due to an inadequate fit of the model, data was randomly split into two equally sized subsamples and an exploratory factor analysis was conducted for all 30 items in the first subsample comprised of 286 cancer patients and 285 general practitioners. The EFA yielded a three-factor structure which was validated through a confirmatory factor analyses in a second subsample comprised of 278 cancer patients and 289 general practitioners.
The data quality of the RSQ was generally good, except low internal consistency and low to moderate test-retest reliability. The four subscales of the RSQ were not confirmed by the confirmatory factor analysis. An exploratory factor analysis suggested a three-factor solution for both general practitioners and patients, which accounted for 61.1% of the variance among general practitioners and 62.5% among patients. The new three-factor solution was verified in a confirmatory factor analyses.
The proposed four-factor model of the RSQ could not be confirmed in this study. Similar challenges have been found by other studies validating the RSQ. An alternative three-factor structure was found for the RSQ.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28472074 View in PubMed
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Older persons' experiences of what influences their vitality - a study of 65- and 75-year-olds in Finland and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291654
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2017 Jun; 31(2):378-387
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Tina Söderbacka
Lisbet Nyström
Lisbeth Fagerström
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Sciences, Åbo Akademi University, Vaasa, Finland.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2017 Jun; 31(2):378-387
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Finland
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Throughout the world, life expectancy has noticeably increased during the past decade, and health promotive initiatives for older persons will therefore become ever more important. During the past few years, interest in what constitutes the source of health for human beings has markedly increased in health science research. An interesting and relatively unresearched domain is what provides older persons the strength and energy to look forward and what positively or negatively influences older persons' vitality. The aim of the study was to explore and describe older persons' vitality and their subjective experiences of what influences their vitality, despite disease and suffering. The study has an explorative and descriptive design. A comprehensive questionnaire including two open-ended questions about vitality was sent to 4927 older persons aged 65 and 75, and a total of 2579 responded to the open-ended questions. Qualitative content analyses were used. A safe and confirming communion, meaningful activities, an optimal state of health and an inner strength were important sources of vitality. Ageing that includes illness or a restricted life, happenings in the world and in one's close environment that threaten inner meaningfulness, and mental burdens that give rise to a feeling of hopelessness or depression decrease vitality. Vitality is an important health resource for 65- and 75-year-olds in that it influences a person's longing for life, love and meaning. Accordingly, it is of fundamental importance that Registered Nurses and other healthcare personnel strengthen older persons' vitality during the ageing process. By taking into consideration that which positively vs. negatively affects the vitality of each unique person, healthcare personnel can strengthen each older person's health resources and attempt to minimise and limit what negatively influences said person's vitality.
PubMed ID
27501344 View in PubMed
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2893 records – page 1 of 290.