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Adherence to perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis among orthopedic trauma patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139154
Source
Can J Surg. 2010 Dec;53(6):367-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Kristopher M Lundine
Susan Nelson
Richard Buckley
Sven Putnis
Paul J Duffy
Author Affiliation
Division of Orthopaedics, Health Sciences Centre, 3330 Hospital Dr. NW, Calgary, Alberta. krislundine@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Surg. 2010 Dec;53(6):367-72
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Antibiotic Prophylaxis
Canada
Cephalexin - therapeutic use
Female
Fractures, Closed - surgery
Humans
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Penicillins - therapeutic use
Perioperative Care - standards
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Surgical Wound Infection - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
The goal of this study was to assess whether patients receive their antibiotic prophylaxis as prescribed. We also investigated what doses and durations of antibiotics are typically ordered, which patients actually receive antibiotics and factors causing the ordered antibiotic regimen to be altered.
We performed a retrospective review of 205 patient charts and sent a national survey to all surgeon members of the Canadian Orthopaedic Trauma Society (COTS) about antibiotic prophylaxis in the setting of surgical treatment for closed fractures.
In all, 93% (179 of 193) of patients received an appropriate preoperative dose of antibiotics, whereas less than 32% (58 of 181) of patients received their postoperative antibiotics as ordered. The most commonly stated reason for patients not receiving their postoperative antibiotics as ordered was patients being discharged before completing 3 postoperative doses. There was a 70% (39 of 56) response rate to the survey sent to COTS surgeons. A single dose of a first-generation cephalosporin preoperatively followed by 3 doses postoperatively is the most common practice among orthopedic trauma surgeons across Canada, but several surgeons give only preoperative prophylaxis.
Adherence to multidose postoperative antibiotic regimens is poor. Meta-analyses have failed to demonstrate the superiority of multidose regimens over single-dose prophylaxis. Single-dose preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis may be a reasonable choice for most orthopedic trauma patients with closed fractures.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21092428 View in PubMed
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Aerobiology in the operating room--a review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233569
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1988 Feb;11 Suppl A:68-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1988
Author
A. Hambraeus
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Bacteriology, University of Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1988 Feb;11 Suppl A:68-76
Date
Feb-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Microbiology
Bacteriological Techniques
Clothing
Humans
Operating Rooms - standards
Surgical Wound Infection - prevention & control
Sweden
Temperature
Ultraviolet Rays
Ventilation
PubMed ID
2896749 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic prescription patterns among Swedish dentists working with dental implant surgery: adherence to recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279522
Source
Clin Oral Implants Res. 2015 Sep;26(9):1064-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Dalia Khalil
Margareta Hultin
Linda Andersson Fred
Nina Parkbring Olsson
Bodil Lund
Source
Clin Oral Implants Res. 2015 Sep;26(9):1064-9
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Antibiotic Prophylaxis - methods
Dental Implantation - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Practice Patterns, Dentists'
Prescriptions
Surgical Wound Infection - prevention & control
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To investigate antibiotic prophylaxis prescription behaviors among Swedish dentists working with dental implant surgery and the influence of scientific reviews.
An observational questionnaire study was conducted in 2008 and 2012. Dental clinic addresses were found through online search services of Swedish telephone directories. The questionnaires were posted to eligible dentists (120 in 2008, 161 in 2012) in the Stockholm region, Sweden. Absolute frequencies were used to describe the data. Chi-square tests were applied to assess statistically significant differences.
The response rate was 75% in 2008 and 88% in 2012. In 2008, 88% of the dentists routinely prescribed antibiotic prophylaxis when performing implant surgery and 74% in 2012 (P = 0.01). There was a significant reduction in the dentists prescription patterns as 65% prescribed a single dose in 2012, compared to 49% in 2008 (P = 0.04). Amoxicillin was the drug of choice for 47% of the respondents in 2012, and 21% in 2008 (P = 0.01). Dentists without postgraduate clinical training were significantly more prone to extend antibiotic administration after surgery (P 
PubMed ID
24730684 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic prophylaxis in acute nonperforated appendicitis. The Danish Multicenter Study Group III.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231205
Source
Ann Surg. 1989 Mar;209(3):307-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1989
Author
T. Bauer
B. Vennits
B. Holm
J. Hahn-Pedersen
D. Lysen
H. Galatius
E S Kristensen
P. Graversen
F. Wilhelmsen
H. Skjoldborg
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, General Hospital of Roenne, Denmark.
Source
Ann Surg. 1989 Mar;209(3):307-11
Date
Mar-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen
Abscess - prevention & control
Acute Disease
Adult
Appendectomy
Appendicitis - surgery
Cefoxitin - therapeutic use
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Premedication
Prospective Studies
Random Allocation
Surgical Wound Infection - prevention & control
Abstract
In a prospective, block-randomized, multicenter study, the safety and efficacy of cefoxitin in preoperative prophylaxis were studied. 1735 patients undergoing appendectomy were evaluable, and half of these patients received 2 g of cefoxitin before undergoing operation. The patients were divided into three groups: patients with a normal appendix, patients with an acutely inflamed appendix, and patients with a gangrenous appendix. The study showed for each group a significant reduction of the incidence of wound infection in patients receiving prophylaxis. However, intra-abdominal abscess formation was not influenced by preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis. Consequently, routine preoperative prophylaxis is recommended before appendectomy.
Notes
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Cites: Arch Surg. 1983 May;118(5):651-56404238
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Cites: Br J Surg. 1984 Feb;71(2):144-66692110
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 1984 Nov;14(5):537-426392282
Cites: Aust N Z J Surg. 1984 Dec;54(6):535-416393937
Cites: Acta Chir Scand. 1985;151(1):73-63885664
Cites: Br J Surg. 1985 Jul;72(7):571-34016543
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 1979 Aug 20;141(34):2293-6494403
PubMed ID
2647050 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic prophylaxis in cesarean section.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64466
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1996 Jul;75(6):537-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
T K Pedersen
J. Blaakaer
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sønderborg Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1996 Jul;75(6):537-9
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Cesarean Section
Denmark
Female
Guidelines
Humans
Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital
Patient Selection
Pregnancy
Preoperative Care
Questionnaires
Surgical Procedures, Elective
Surgical Wound Infection - prevention & control
Abstract
BACKGROUND. To investigate the guidelines for patient selection and drug regimens for application of antibiotic prophylaxis in relation to cesarean section in the maternity clinics in Denmark. METHODS. A questionnaire to all the Danish maternity clinics that perform cesarean section, concerning indications for application of antibiotic prophylaxis and antibiotic regimens to patients undergoing acute and elective cesarean section. RESULTS. All departments (n = 48) returned the questionnaire. Twenty departments (46%) provided written guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis. Four departments (8%) used antibiotic prophylaxis to elective cesarean sections, 25 departments (52%) applied antibiotics to all emergency sections. In the presence of the rupture of membranes or prolongation of labor (> 12 hrs) 58% and 63% of the departments applied antibiotic prophylaxis, respectively. The most infrequent first choice drug was cefuroxim, employed by 27 departments (56%). Concerning timing, 21 departments (44%) applied antibiotics after cord clamping and 13 departments (27%) before incision. CONCLUSION. We propose a nation-wide prospective investigation on the rate of infections associated with cesarean section to set up rational guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis.
PubMed ID
8693929 View in PubMed
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[Antibiotic prophylaxis in Danish orthopedic alloplastic surgery].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215327
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Apr 24;157(17):2439-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-24-1995
Author
H. Aagaard
H H Noer
C. Tørholm
Author Affiliation
Ortopaedkirurgisk afdeling T, Amtssygehuset i Gentofte.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Apr 24;157(17):2439-42
Date
Apr-24-1995
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Denmark
Hip Prosthesis - adverse effects
Humans
Knee Prosthesis - adverse effects
Premedication
Questionnaires
Surgical Wound Infection - prevention & control
Abstract
In order to assess the routine use of prophylactic antibiotics (AB) in arthroplastic surgery in Denmark, questionnaires were sent to all Danish orthopaedic departments and all general surgical departments that perform orthopaedic surgery. Fifty-six departments (93%) returned the questionnaires. All departments use prophylactic AB in primary knee and hip arthroplasty and in revision arthroplasty. In addition, all departments but one use prophylactic AB in arthroplasty secondary to osteosynthesis. The largest group of departments uses penicillinase-resistant penicillin (PRP) in their standard prophylaxis regimens. The second largest group uses second generation cephalosporins. With one exception, all use cefuroxime. A small group uses other types of AB. Fifteen percent of the departments combine systemic AB with gentamicin bone cement (GC) in primary hip arthroplasty, whereas 22% use this combination in primary knee arthroplasty. Significantly more departments use GC in revision arthroplasty (89%) and in arthroplasty secondary to osteosynthesis (63%). Prolonged antibiotic prophylaxis (beyond 24 hours) is practised to a significantly higher degree in revision arthroplastic surgery than in the primary arthroplasties. In conclusion, one of two homogeneous groups of prophylactic AB is used in arthroplastic surgery in Denmark as prescribed in the literature.
PubMed ID
7762101 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic prophylaxis in obstetric procedures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139547
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2010 Sep;32(9):878-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Julie van Schalkwyk
Nancy Van Eyk
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2010 Sep;32(9):878-92
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibiotic Prophylaxis - standards
Canada
Cerclage, Cervical
Delivery, Obstetric
Dilatation and Curettage
Endocarditis - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Perineum - injuries - surgery
Surgical Wound Infection - prevention & control
Abstract
To review the evidence and provide recommendations on antibiotic prophylaxis for obstetrical procedures.
Outcomes evaluated include need and effectiveness of antibiotics to prevent infections in obstetrical procedures.
Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline and The Cochrane Library on the topic of antibiotic prophylaxis in obstetrical procedures. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. Searches were updated on a regular basis and articles published from January 1978 to June 2009 were incorporated in the guideline. Current guidelines published by the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology were also incorporated. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies.
The evidence obtained was reviewed and evaluated by the Infectious Diseases Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada under the leadership of the principal authors, and recommendations were made according to guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1).
Implementation of this guideline should reduce the cost and harm resulting from the administration of antibiotics when they are not required and the harm resulting from failure to administer antibiotics when they would be beneficial. SUMMARY STATEMENTS: 1. Available evidence does not support the use of prophylactic antibiotics to reduce infectious morbidity following operative vaginal delivery. (II-1) 2. There is insufficient evidence to argue for or against the use of prophylactic antibiotics to reduce infectious morbidity for manual removal of the placenta. (III) 3. There is insufficient evidence to argue for or against the use of prophylactic antibiotics at the time of postpartum dilatation and curettage for retained products of conception. (III) 4. Available evidence does not support the use of prophylactic antibiotics to reduce infectious morbidity following elective or emergency cerclage. (II-3)
1. All women undergoing elective or emergency Caesarean section should receive antibiotic prophylaxis. (I-A) 2. The choice of antibiotic for Caesarean section should be a single dose of a first-generation cephalosporin. If the patient has a penicillin allergy, clindamycin or erythromycin can be used. (I-A) 3. The timing of prophylactic antibiotics for Caesarean section should be 15 to 60 minutes prior to skin incision. No additional doses are recommended. (I-A) 4. If an open abdominal procedure is lengthy (>3 hours) or estimated blood loss is greater than 1500 mL, an additional dose of the prophylactic antibiotic may be given 3 to 4 hours after the initial dose. (III-L) 5. Prophylactic antibiotics may be considered for the reduction of infectious morbidity associated with repair of third and fourth degree perineal injury. (I-B) 6. In patients with morbid obesity (BMI>35), doubling the antibiotic dose may be considered. (III-B) 7. Antibiotics should not be administered solely to prevent endocarditis for patients who undergo an obstetrical procedure of any kind. (III-E).
PubMed ID
21050523 View in PubMed
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Antibiotics prophylaxis in connection with caesarean section--guidelines at Norwegian maternity departments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129131
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2011 Nov 29;131(23):2355-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-29-2011
Author
Hanne-Merete Eriksen
Anja Ramberg Sæther
Inger Økland
Ellen Langen
Ylva Sandness
Anne Bødtker
Finn Egil Skjeldestad
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Norway. hmer@fhi.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2011 Nov 29;131(23):2355-8
Date
Nov-29-2011
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Antibiotic Prophylaxis
Cesarean Section - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Norway
Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital
Physician's Practice Patterns
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Pregnancy
Surgical Wound Infection - prevention & control
Abstract
The frequency of caesarean sections is increasing. Infection in operation wounds and/or underlying spaces and organs is a common complication. In Veileder I fødselshjelp [Clinical Guidelines in Obstetrics], 2008, antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended in the form of single dose ampicillin or first generation cephalosporins in connection with acute caesarean sections and under special conditions such as prolonged operations. We wanted to find out whether Norwegian maternity departments follow these recommendations.
All head senior consultants at maternity departments that carried out more than one caesarean section in 2008 were invited to take part in a survey of the department's written guidelines for use of antibiotic prophylaxis in connection with caesarean section. The extent to which the guidelines were followed was evaluated using data from the Norwegian Surveillance System for Hospital-Associated Infections (NOIS).
38 of the 42 maternity wards in the investigation had written guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis. Four of these maternity wards gave prophylaxis in all Caesarean sections, one only on indication, and 33 in acute Caesarean section. The guidelines varied as regards choice of type of antibiotic and time of administration. In the maternity wards with written guidelines recommending use of antibiotic prophylaxis in all Caesarean sections, were practice in accordance with the guidelines. When the guidelines recommended prophylactic use only in acute operations, there was agreement between practice and guidelines in 71 % to 97 % of the patients in the ward.
Most Norwegian maternity wards have written guidelines on antibiotic prophylaxis in Caesarean section. The contents of the guidelines varied but are mainly in agreement with current Norwegian recommendations.
PubMed ID
22139118 View in PubMed
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The antimicrobial effectiveness of operative-site preparative agents: a microbiological and clinical study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245644
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1980 Jul;62(5):826-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1980
Author
M A Ritter
M L French
H E Eitzen
T J Gioe
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1980 Jul;62(5):826-8
Date
Jul-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Infective Agents, Local - pharmacology
Bacteria - isolation & purification
Disinfection
Hexachlorophene - pharmacology
Hip Joint - surgery
Humans
Iodine - pharmacology
Iodophors - pharmacology
Preoperative Care
Skin - drug effects - microbiology
Sterilization
Surgical Wound Infection - prevention & control
Triclosan - pharmacology
Abstract
Eight wound preparative agents (one triclosan compound, one hexachlorophene compound, and six iodophors) were evaluated under actual operating-room conditions for efficacy in de-germing the operative site prior to the performance of 310 total hip arthroplasties. All of the preparations tested achieved a significant reduction (p less than or equal to 0.001) of indigenous skin microflora compared with the pre-scrub level in both the post-scrub and the postoperative cultures. Two iodophors, when applied as sprays, demonstrated excellent bactericidal action, were less time-consuming and easier to use than the compounds that were applied as scrubs, and did not alter the low (0.42 per cent) infection rate that we have recorded over a period of four years.
PubMed ID
7391106 View in PubMed
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[Application of prolonged flow-aspiration drainage of laparotomy wounds in order to reduce suppurative septic complications in bowels reconstructive surgery].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260356
Source
Vestn Khir Im I I Grek. 2014;173(4):83-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
S N Shcherba
V V Polovinkin
Source
Vestn Khir Im I I Grek. 2014;173(4):83-6
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Wound Closure Techniques - adverse effects
Colonic Diseases - surgery
Colostomy - methods
Comparative Effectiveness Research
Drainage - methods
Female
Humans
Laparotomy - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Russia
Suction - methods
Surgical Wound Infection - prevention & control
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The article presents the follow-up study of 254 onco-proctologic patients after reconstructive abdominoperitoneal resections. Patients were divided into 4 statistically homogeneous groups (2 main and 2 control groups). A comparative analysis of middle and lateral laparotomy wounds healing was made. Laparotomy wounds were stitched up using conventional method (in layers, tightly) and using other method of prolonged flow-aspiration drainage of hypodermic tissue. Postoperative wound infections were noted in 11.4% patients in case of conventional means. The prolonged flow-aspiration drainage in laparotomy wounds causes only 1.5% of complications.
PubMed ID
25552113 View in PubMed
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67 records – page 1 of 7.