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13 records – page 1 of 2.

[Antibiotic prophylaxis in emergency abdominal surgery].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236854
Source
Vestn Khir Im I I Grek. 1986 Jul;137(7):11-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1986
Author
A Kh Guseinov
G K Vandiaev
E P Khlebnikov
Source
Vestn Khir Im I I Grek. 1986 Jul;137(7):11-5
Date
Jul-1986
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen - surgery
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Emergencies
Female
Humans
Length of Stay - economics
Male
Middle Aged
Premedication - economics
Russia
Surgical Wound Infection - economics - prevention & control
Abstract
The effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis was analysed in 1054 emergency operations (337 patients were included in the experimental group and 717 patients in the control group). The amount of suppurations was reduced from 11.5% to 5.04%; the period of staying at the hospital was shortened from 17.3 to 14.1 days.
PubMed ID
2951923 View in PubMed
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A cost effective approach to surgical antibiotic prophylaxis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223292
Source
Can J Hosp Pharm. 1992 Aug;45(4):151-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1992
Author
M M Pavan
D L Malyuk
Author Affiliation
Royal Columbian Hospital, New Westminster, British Columbia.
Source
Can J Hosp Pharm. 1992 Aug;45(4):151-6
Date
Aug-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appendectomy - adverse effects - economics
British Columbia
Cefazolin - economics - therapeutic use
Cefoxitin - economics - therapeutic use
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Drug Costs
Drug Therapy, Combination - economics - therapeutic use
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and over
Humans
Interdepartmental Relations
Metronidazole - economics - therapeutic use
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - economics - statistics & numerical data
Premedication - economics
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Research Design
Surgical Wound Infection - economics - prevention & control
Abstract
Cefoxitin has been the prophylactic antibiotic of choice for appendectomy and colorectal surgery at this institution. Recent information suggests that cefazolin and metronidazole given as a single intravenous preparation could be a cost-effective alternative to cefoxitin or cefotetan for surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis of uncomplicated appendectomies. This study was conducted to determine the efficacy, toxicity, and cost of the current antibiotic regimens used for prophylaxis of uncomplicated appendectomies, to evaluate the efficacy, toxicity and cost of the cefazolin plus metronidazole combination in uncomplicated appendectomies, and to facilitate a cooperative working relationship between the Departments of Pharmacy and General Surgery. Although the numbers involved were small, this study suggests that the cefazolin/metronidazole combination is cost-effective. It is suggested that research is warranted in evaluating combinations such as this as cost-effective alternatives to current therapy.
PubMed ID
10123058 View in PubMed
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The cost of vacuum-assisted closure therapy in treatment of deep sternal wound infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158804
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2008 Feb;42(1):85-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Arash Mokhtari
Johan Sjögren
Johan Nilsson
Ronny Gustafsson
Malin Malmsjö
Richard Ingemansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. arash.mokhtari@med.lu.se
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2008 Feb;42(1):85-9
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Hospital Costs
Humans
Male
Mediastinitis - economics - etiology - mortality - therapy
Middle Aged
Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy - economics
Registries
Sternum - surgery
Surgical Wound Infection - economics - mortality - therapy
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Surgical sites infections are very expensive and the total costs for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery followed by deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) with conventional therapy are estimated to be 2.8 times that for normal, CABG surgery. Promising results have been reported with vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in patients with DSWI. This study presents the cost of VAC therapy in patients with DSWI after CABG surgery.
Thirty-eight CABG patients with DSWI, between 2001 and 2005, were treated with VAC therapy. The cost of surgery, intensive care, ward care, laboratory tests and other costs were analyzed.
No three-month mortality or recurrent infection was observed. The average cost of CABG procedure and treatment of DSWI was 2.5 times higher than the mean cost of CABG alone. No significant correlations were found between the preoperative EuroSCORE and the cost of DSWI therapy.
VAC therapy for patients who underwent CABG surgery followed by DSWI seems to be cost effective, and has low mortality rate.
PubMed ID
18273735 View in PubMed
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The economics of preventing revisions in total hip replacement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201827
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 1999 Apr;70(2):163-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
U. Persson
M. Persson
H. Malchau
Author Affiliation
Swedish Institute for Health Economics, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 1999 Apr;70(2):163-9
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - economics - statistics & numerical data
Bone Cements - economics - therapeutic use
Cost Savings
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infection Control - economics - methods
Patient Selection
Prosthesis Failure - economics
Reoperation - economics
Risk factors
Surgical Wound Infection - economics - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We showed that the selection of a cost-effective type of cement and method of prophylaxis against deep infections for patients undergoing total hip replacement depended on the number of arthroplasties performed each year at individual hospitals. When 100 arthroplasties were performed each year, the use of Palacos cement and systemic antibiotics reduced the total costs to the department, i.e., the cost of cement, infection prophylaxis and revisions. The use of gentamicin-impregnated cement in combination with systemic antibiotics will further reduce the risk of revision and is another cost-effective strategy. The most effective infection prophylaxis would be achieved with a combination of gentamicin-impregnated cement, systemic antibiotics and surgical enclosure. However, the additional cost of the surgical enclosure would not be offset by cost savings due to reduced risk of revisions.
PubMed ID
10366918 View in PubMed
Less detail

Estimated costs of postoperative wound infections. A case-control study of marginal hospital and social security costs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217190
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1994 Oct;113(2):283-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1994
Author
K B Poulsen
A. Bremmelgaard
A I Sørensen
D. Raahave
J V Petersen
Author Affiliation
National Center for Hospital Hygiene, Statens Seruminstitut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1994 Oct;113(2):283-95
Date
Oct-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospital Costs
Humans
Length of Stay - economics
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Economic
Social Security - economics
Surgical Wound Infection - economics - epidemiology
Abstract
A cohort of 4515 surgical patients in ten selected intervention groups was followed. Three hundred and seventeen developed postoperative wound infections, and 291 of these cases were matched 1:1 to controls by operation, sex and age. In comparison to the controls the cases stayed longer in hospital after the intervention and had more contact after discharge with the social security system. Using data from a national sentinel reference database of the incidence of postoperative wound infections, and using national activity data, we established an empirical cost model based on the estimated marginal costs of hospital resources and social sick pay. It showed that the hospital resources spent on the ten groups, which represent half of the postoperative wound infections in Denmark, amounted to approximately 0.5% of the annual national hospital budget. This stratified model creates a better basis for selecting groups of operations which need priority in terms of preventive measures.
Notes
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Cites: Surg Clin North Am. 1980 Feb;60(1):27-407361226
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1980 Feb;141(2):248-576767793
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Cites: World J Surg. 1982 May;6(3):362-57113241
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Cites: Infect Control. 1986 Feb;7(2 Suppl):92-53633895
Cites: Ann Thorac Surg. 1986 Sep;42(3):240-63092753
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Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 1988 May 9;150(19):1147-83376254
Cites: Arch Surg. 1988 Nov;123(11):1305-83140764
Cites: J Hosp Infect. 1989 Jan;13(1):1-182564012
Cites: Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1990 Feb;11(2):89-932107250
Cites: Arch Surg. 1990 Jun;125(6):794-8032346380
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Jul 16;152(29):2106-102399578
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 May 13;153(20):1416-92028549
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 May 13;153(20):1420-22028550
Cites: Med Care. 1992 Apr;30(4):373-61556884
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 1992 Oct;39(5):467-701424821
PubMed ID
7925666 View in PubMed
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[Hospital infections cost money and suffering].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237132
Source
Vardfacket. 1986 Apr 24;10(8):24-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-24-1986

Infection after cholecystectomy, hysterectomy or appendectomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178562
Source
Health Rep. 2004 Jul;15(4):11-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Michelle Rotermann
Author Affiliation
Health Statistics Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario. Michelle.Rotermann@statcan.ca
Source
Health Rep. 2004 Jul;15(4):11-23
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Appendectomy - adverse effects - utilization
Canada - epidemiology
Cholecystectomy - adverse effects - utilization
Cross Infection - economics - epidemiology
Female
Health Care Surveys
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hysterectomy - adverse effects - utilization
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Surgical Wound Infection - economics - epidemiology
Abstract
This article uses patient-linked data to focus on hospitalization with post-operative infection following cholecystectomy, hysterectomy or appendectomy. The average number of hospital days and the costs of readmission are also estimated.
Data for surgeries in fiscal years 1997/98, 1998/99 and 1999/00 are from the Health Person-Oriented Information Database.
Bivariate tabulations were used to estimate the percentage of patients hospitalized with post-operative infection after cholecystectomy, hysterectomy or appendectomy between 1997/98 and 1999/00. Logistic regression was used to explore associations between infection and patient characteristics, readmission, and peri-operative mortality, while controlling for surgical characteristics.
Hospitalization with post-operative infection was relatively rare, occurring in 1.4% of cholecystectomy, 2.0% of hysterectomy, and 3.8% of appendectomy patients. The associated costs of readmission for post-operative infection for the three surgeries were estimated at 5.4 to 6.3 million dollars annually. Old age, being male, surgical complexity and approach, and diabetes were associated with hospitalization involving a post-operative infection.
PubMed ID
15346725 View in PubMed
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[Postoperative wound infections in a general surgery department with an isolation ward].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246838
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1979 Sep 10;99(25):1177-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-10-1979
Author
J. Sander
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1979 Sep 10;99(25):1177-9
Date
Sep-10-1979
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Norway
Patient Isolation
Surgery Department, Hospital
Surgical Wound Infection - economics - epidemiology - microbiology
PubMed ID
505432 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Registration of surgical infections can save multimillions in health care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237961
Source
Lakartidningen. 1985 Dec 11;82(50):4428, 4430-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-11-1985
Author
K. Kjellgren
B. Norberg
B. Fryklund
L G Burman
Source
Lakartidningen. 1985 Dec 11;82(50):4428, 4430-1
Date
Dec-11-1985
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Length of Stay - economics
Registries
Surgical Wound Infection - economics
Sweden
PubMed ID
4079617 View in PubMed
Less detail

13 records – page 1 of 2.