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[Correlation of the frequency of surgical procedures on the peripheral immunologic organs with the frequency of oncologic and other somatic diseases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167153
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2006;52(4):458-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
A V Dobzhanskii
V M Matrosov
M V Parusov
N I Pavlov
M V Travin
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2006;52(4):458-60
Date
2006
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Epidemiology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Immune System - surgery
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lymphatic System - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - immunology
Russia - epidemiology
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Regional Oncological Dispensary, Kostroma The study included 388 cancer patients (group 1) and 381 cases of other pathologies (group 2). Surgery on lymphoid organs was performed in 121 patients (31%) in group 1 and 150 in group 2. It was concluded that such intervention in the immune system was not an oncological hazard. That phenomenon might be accounted for by the specificity of immune response in patients suffering from such diseases.
PubMed ID
17024823 View in PubMed
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Frequency of surgery and hospital admissions for communicable diseases in a high- and middle-income setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266638
Source
Br J Surg. 2015 Aug;102(9):1142-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
A. Jarnheimer
G. Kantor
S. Bickler
P. Farmer
L. Hagander
Source
Br J Surg. 2015 Aug;102(9):1142-9
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Communicable Diseases - surgery
Developed Countries - statistics & numerical data
Developing Countries - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
South Africa
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
In high-income countries, non-communicable diseases drive the demand for surgical healthcare. Middle-income countries face a double disease burden, of both communicable and non-communicable disease. The aim of this study was to describe the role of surgery for the in-hospital care of infectious conditions in the high-income country Sweden and the middle-income country South Africa.
A retrospective cohort study was performed of 1.4 million infectious disease admissions. The study populations were the entire population of Sweden, and a cohort of 3.5 million South Africans with private healthcare insurance, during a 7-year interval. The outcome measures were frequency of surgical procedures across a spectrum of diseases, and sex and age during the medical care event.
Some 8.1 per cent of Swedish and 15.7 per cent of South African hospital admissions were because of infectious disease. The proportion of infectious disease admissions that were associated with surgery was constant over time: 8.0 (95 per cent c.i. 7.9 to 8.1) per cent in Sweden and 21.1 (21.0 to 21.2) per cent in South Africa. The frequency of surgery was 2.6 (2.6 to 2.7) times greater in South Africa, and 2.2 (2.2 to 2.3) times higher after standardization for age, sex and disease category.
The study suggests that surgical care is required to manage patients with communicable diseases, even in high-income settings with efficient prevention and functional primary care. These results further stress the importance of scaling up functional surgical health systems in low- and middle-income countries, where the disease burden is distinguished by infectious disease.
PubMed ID
26059635 View in PubMed
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Group II phospholipase A2 in serum in critically ill surgical patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218134
Source
Crit Care Med. 1994 Jun;22(6):956-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
J M Grönroos
K. Kuttila
T J Nevalainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Crit Care Med. 1994 Jun;22(6):956-9
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute-Phase Proteins - analysis
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Catalysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Clinical Enzyme Tests - statistics & numerical data
Critical Illness
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Phospholipases A - blood
Phospholipases A2
Prospective Studies
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To study the association of increased serum group II phospholipase A2 concentrations to C-reactive protein concentrations in the sera of critically ill surgical patients.
Prospective study.
Surgical intensive care unit (ICU) of a university hospital.
Sixty-seven consecutive patients admitted to the surgical ICU.
The catalytic activity of phospholipase A2 and the serum concentrations of group II phospholipase A2 and C-reactive protein were measured daily during each patient's stay in the ICU. A total of 205 blood samples were taken. In addition, the preoperative serum levels of group II phospholipase A2 were determined in patients admitted for cardiac surgery.
Serum group II phospholipase A2 values correlated statistically significantly with the catalytic activity of phospholipase A2 and serum C-reactive protein values. In particular, severe infections, diseases involving tissue destruction, and elective operations per se, caused considerable increases in serum group II phospholipase A2 concentrations.
Our results support the earlier presented idea that group II phospholipase A2 is an acute-phase reactant.
PubMed ID
7515776 View in PubMed
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High and low surgical procedure rates in census divisions across Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219501
Source
Health Rep. 1994;6(4):403-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
J F Gentleman
G F Parsons
M N Walsh
E. Vayda
Author Affiliation
Health Statistics Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
Source
Health Rep. 1994;6(4):403-40
Date
1994
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Demography
Female
Health Services Misuse - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Teaching - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Reference Values
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This paper identifies outliers (unusually high or low values) among rates of 39 surgical procedures in 255 Canadian census divisions. Surgery rates for the two-year period from April 1988 through March 1990 were standardized for age and sex, and then "normalized" to adjust for differences in census division population sizes. Among the 39 procedures, a total of 402 outlying census division rates were found, of which 48 were deemed to be very high, 254 high, 79 low, and 21 very low. The results are presented for individual procedures, by province, and for the 16 census divisions in which medical schools and their associated teaching hospitals are located.
Notes
Erratum In: Health Rep 1995;7(1):64
PubMed ID
7795179 View in PubMed
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Hospital care utilization of IVF/ICSI twins followed until 2-7 years of age: a controlled Danish national cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30173
Source
Hum Reprod. 2004 Nov;19(11):2529-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Anja Pinborg
Anne Loft
Steen Rasmussen
Anders Nyboe Andersen
Author Affiliation
The Fertility Clinic, University of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, National Board of Health, Health Statistics, Copenhagen, Denmark. apinborg@rh.dk
Source
Hum Reprod. 2004 Nov;19(11):2529-36
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Hospitalized - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Fertilization in Vitro - statistics & numerical data
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital Units - utilization
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Male
Pregnancy
Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic - statistics & numerical data
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Twins
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
BACKGROUND: IVF/ICSI twins are likely to have a higher risk of prematurity associated with higher morbidity. The aim of this study was to assess the use of hospital care resources in IVF/ICSI twins on data retrieved until 2-7 years of child age. METHODS: National controlled cohort study on hospital admissions and surgical interventions in 3393 IVF twins, 10,239 spontaneously conceived twins and 5130 IVF singletons born between 1995 and 2000 in Denmark. Cross-linkage of data from the Danish IVF Registry and the National Patient Registry enabled us to identify children who were admitted to hospital or underwent an operation. RESULTS: The frequency of hospitalized children was 69.8, 69.6 and 49.8%, and of children who underwent a surgical intervention 10.6, 11.2 and 8.5% in IVF/ICSI twins, control twins and IVF/ICSI singletons respectively. Odds ratios (OR) (95% confidence intervals) of hospitalization in IVF/ICSI twins versus control twins and IVF/ICSI singletons were 1.04 (0.96, 1.14) and 2.44 (2.22, 2.63) and OR adjusted for year of birth, maternal age and parity were 1.00 (0.91, 1.11) and 2.38 (2.17, 2.63) respectively. Also for term birth infants, IVF/ICSI twins were more likely to be hospitalized than IVF/ICSI singletons: adjusted OR 1.37 (1.22, 1.51). Similar risk of a surgical procedure was observed in IVF/ICSI versus control twins. However, IVF/ICSI twins more often underwent a surgical intervention than IVF/ICSI singletons: adjusted OR 1.26 (1.08, 1.47). This risk disappeared when restricted to term infants: adjusted OR 1.00 (0.81, 1.22). Different sex IVF/ICSI and control twins had equal risk of admissions and surgical interventions, and ICSI children had the same risk as children born after conventional IVF. CONCLUSIONS: Though the use of hospital care resources was similar in IVF/ICSI and control twins, the over-use in IVF/ICSI twins versus IVF/ICSI singletons adds to the arguments for implementing elective single embryo transfer as our standard procedure.
PubMed ID
15319391 View in PubMed
Less detail

Waiting for children's surgery in Canada: the Canadian Paediatric Surgical Wait Times project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134781
Source
CMAJ. 2011 Jun 14;183(9):E559-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-14-2011
Author
James G Wright
Rena J Menaker
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario. james.wright@sickkids.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2011 Jun 14;183(9):E559-64
Date
Jun-14-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers
Canada
Child
Humans
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Waiting Lists
Abstract
In addition to possibly prolonged suffering and anxiety, extended waits for children's surgery beyond critical developmental periods has potential for lifelong impact. The goal of this study was to determine the duration of waits for surgery for children and youth at Canadian paediatric academic health sciences centres using clinically-derived access targets (i.e., the maximum acceptable waiting periods for completion of specific types of surgery) as used in this Canadian Paediatric Surgical Wait Times project.
We prospectively applied standardized wait-time targets for surgery, created by nominal-group consensus expert panels, to pediatric patients at children's health sciences centres across Canada with decision-to-treat dates of Sept. 1, 2007 or later. From Jan. 1 to Dec. 30, 2009, patients' actual wait times were compared with their target wait times to determine the percentage of patients receiving surgery after the target waiting period.
Overall, 27% of pediatric patients from across Canada (17,411 of 64,012) received their surgery after their standardized target waiting period. Dentistry, ophthalmology, plastic surgery and cancer surgery showed the highest percentages of surgeries completed past target.
Many children wait too long for surgery in Canada. Specific attention is required, in particular, in dentistry, ophthalmology, plastic surgery and cancer care, to address children's wait times for surgery. Improved access may be realized with use of national wait-time targets.
Notes
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2000 Jul;131(7):887-9910916327
Cites: J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2001 Sep;59(9):1062-75; discussion 1075-711526580
Cites: Can J Surg. 2004 Jun;47(3):179-8115264379
Cites: Dev Psychobiol. 2005 Apr;46(3):252-6115772969
Cites: Can J Surg. 2005 Oct;48(5):349-5116248130
Cites: Can J Surg. 2011 Apr;54(2):107-1021443828
Cites: J Can Dent Assoc. 2007 Apr;73(3):241-317439708
Cites: Healthc Q. 2007;10(4):51-818019899
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 Nov 4;179(10):1001-518981440
Cites: CMAJ. 2009 Apr 28;180(9):903, E2019398730
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Mar 8;356(10):1040-717347457
PubMed ID
21543299 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.