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[Accidents, complications and patients' complaints as causes for surgical corrections].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209487
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Jan 30;117(3):398-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-1997

Achieving the National Quality Forum's "Never Events": prevention of wrong site, wrong procedure, and wrong patient operations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164254
Source
Ann Surg. 2007 Apr;245(4):526-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Robert K Michaels
Martin A Makary
Yasser Dahab
Frank J Frassica
Eugenie Heitmiller
Lisa C Rowen
Richard Crotreau
Henry Brem
Peter J Pronovost
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA.
Source
Ann Surg. 2007 Apr;245(4):526-32
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Protocols
Humans
Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations
Medical Errors - prevention & control
Medical Laboratory Science
Risk factors
Safety
Safety Management - methods
Societies, Medical
Surgery Department, Hospital - organization & administration - standards
Surgical Procedures, Operative - standards
United States
United States Department of Veterans Affairs
Abstract
Review the evidence regarding methods to prevent wrong site operations and present a framework that healthcare organizations can use to evaluate whether they have reduced the probability of wrong site, wrong procedure, and wrong patient operations.
Operations involving the wrong site, patient, and procedure continue despite national efforts by regulators and professional organizations. Little is known about effective policies to reduce these "never events," and healthcare professional's knowledge or appropriate use of these policies to mitigate events.
A literature review of the evidence was performed using PubMed and Google; key words used were wrong site surgery, wrong side surgery, wrong patient surgery, and wrong procedure surgery. The framework to evaluate safety includes assessing if a behaviorally specific policy or procedure exists, whether staff knows about the policy, and whether the policy is being used appropriately.
Higher-level policies or programs have been implemented by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery, Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, Veteran's Health Administration, Canadian Orthopaedic, and the North American Spine Society Associations to reduce wrong site surgery. No scientific evidence is available to guide hospitals in evaluating whether they have an effective policy, and whether staff know of the policy and appropriately use the policy to prevent "never events."
There is limited evidence of behavioral interventions to reduce wrong site, patient, and surgical procedures. We have outlined a framework of measures that healthcare organizations can use to start evaluating whether they have reduced adverse events in operations.
Notes
Cites: Anesthesiology. 2006 Nov;105(5):877-8417065879
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2006 Aug;41(4 Pt 2):1599-61716898981
Cites: J Crit Care. 2003 Jun;18(2):71-512800116
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1998 Apr;80(4):4639563374
Cites: Crit Care Clin. 2005 Jan;21(1):1-19, vii15579349
Cites: Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2005 Jan-Feb;30(1):99-10315690274
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2005 Oct;87(10):2193-516203882
Cites: Pediatrics. 2005 Dec;116(6):1506-1216322178
Cites: Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2006 Feb;32(2):102-816568924
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2006 Apr 4;144(7):510-616585665
Cites: Arch Surg. 2006 Apr;141(4):353-7; discussion 357-816618892
Cites: Ann Surg. 2006 May;243(5):628-32; discussion 632-516632997
Cites: Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2006 Jun;32(6):351-516776390
Cites: Crit Care Med. 2006 Jul;34(7):1988-9516715029
Cites: JAMA. 2006 Aug 9;296(6):696-916896113
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2003 Feb;85-A(2):193-712571293
PubMed ID
17414599 View in PubMed
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Antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery. Committee on Antimicrobial Agents, Canadian Infectious Disease Society.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217199
Source
CMAJ. 1994 Oct 1;151(7):925-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-1994
Author
T K Waddell
O D Rotstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1994 Oct 1;151(7):925-31
Date
Oct-1-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Canada
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Double-Blind Method
Drug Administration Routes
Humans
Premedication - standards
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk factors
Surgical Procedures, Operative - standards
Surgical Wound Infection - etiology - prevention & control
Time Factors
Abstract
To provide guidelines for antimicrobial prophylaxis on the basis of the type of surgical procedure.
Standard drug regimens for prophylaxis of infection in a variety of surgical procedures were considered, including a first-generation cephalosporin; an aminoglycoside in combination with metronidazole, clindamycin or erythromycin; a second-generation cephalosporin; and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.
In order of importance: efficacy, side effects and cost.
A MEDLINE search of articles published between January 1980 and December 1991. For clinical trial data, greatest emphasis was placed on randomized, double-blind studies using appropriate controls.
The Committee on Antimicrobial Agents of the Canadian Infectious Disease Society (CIDS) and two recognized experts (T.K.W. and O.D.R.) recommended antimicrobial regimens suitable for prophylaxis of infections in surgery. Whenever possible, recommendations were based on data from randomized controlled trials.
Implementation of the guidelines is expected to reduce the incidence of postoperative infections, the inappropriate use of antibiotics and costs to hospitals.
Antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended for operations with a high risk of postoperative wound infection or with a low risk of infection but significant consequences if infection occurs. These operations include clean-contaminated procedures and certain clean procedures. Drugs should be administered intravenously immediately before the operation. In colorectal operations oral administration also appears to be effective. A single dose is sufficient for most procedures. The regimen chosen depends on the pathogens usually associated with wound infection in a given operation, the serum half-life of the drugs, the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in the local hospital and the cost of the drugs.
The guidelines were compared with others in standard textbooks of surgery and peer-reviewed articles. The guidelines were prepared and revised by the Committee on Antimicrobial Agents of the CIDS. They were then reviewed and revised further by the Council of the CIDS.
The CIDS was solely responsible for developing, funding and endorsing these guidelines.
Notes
Cites: Arch Surg. 1981 Apr;116(4):466-97213003
Cites: Surg Gynecol Obstet. 1983 Mar;156(3):313-86828975
Cites: Surgery. 1961 Jul;50:161-816722001
Cites: Surgery. 1969 Jul;66(1):97-1034892316
Cites: Ann Surg. 1972 Aug;176(2):227-324562009
Cites: Arch Surg. 1973 Aug;107(2):319-234719580
Cites: Ann Surg. 1976 Oct;184(4):443-52827989
Cites: South Med J. 1977 Oct;70 Suppl 1:4-8910187
Cites: Ann Surg. 1979 Jun;189(6):691-9378140
Cites: Surg Clin North Am. 1980 Feb;60(1):15-257361218
Cites: Arch Surg. 1983 Oct;118(10):1213-76615204
Cites: Ann Surg. 1984 Jan;199(1):107-116691723
Cites: Arch Surg. 1985 Jul;120(7):829-323160322
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1986 Oct 30;315(18):1129-383531863
Cites: Am J Surg. 1986 Nov;152(5):552-93535553
Cites: J Urol. 1987 Aug;138(2):245-523298693
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1987 Nov;70(5):755-83658286
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1987 Oct;157(4 Pt 1):794-83118716
Cites: Surg Gynecol Obstet. 1989 Mar;168(3):283-92645669
Cites: Surg Gynecol Obstet. 1989 Sep;169(3):219-222672385
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1990 Jan 18;322(3):153-602403655
Cites: World J Surg. 1989 Nov-Dec;13(6):798-801; discussion 801-22696231
Cites: Can J Surg. 1990 Oct;33(5):385-82224658
Comment In: CMAJ. 1995 May 1;152(9):1381; author reply 13827728684
Comment In: CMAJ. 1995 May 1;152(9):1381-27728685
PubMed ID
7922928 View in PubMed
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[A report on quality of surgical treatment: no evidence of the fact that bigger hospitals are better than small ones].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214124
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Oct 4;92(40):3646
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-4-1995

[Beware of the surgery at small hospitals!...or?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218605
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Mar 9;91(10):926, 931-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-9-1994

Centralization, certification, and monitoring. Readmissions and complications after surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236350
Source
Med Care. 1986 Nov;24(11):1044-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1986
Author
L L Roos
S M Cageorge
N P Roos
R. Danzinger
Source
Med Care. 1986 Nov;24(11):1044-66
Date
Nov-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cholecystectomy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital Departments - standards
Humans
Hysterectomy
Male
Manitoba
Medical Staff Privileges
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Patient Readmission
Postoperative Complications
Prostatectomy
Quality of Health Care
Registries
Statistics as Topic
Surgery Department, Hospital - standards
Surgical Procedures, Operative - standards
Abstract
Research on adverse outcomes following common surgical procedures has suggested the importance of hospital and surgeon variables. Policy directions depend on which factors are important in influencing patient outcomes and what sorts of policies are feasible. Focusing on where a given procedure is performed highlights a concern for centralization; emphasizing who should perform a particular operation implies physician certification. Finally, monitoring involves identifying particular hospitals that appear to have relatively poor (or relatively good) results. This paper analyzes patient, surgeon, and hospital characteristics associated with serious postdischarge complications of hysterectomy, cholecystectomy, and prostatectomy in patients age 25 and over in Manitoba, Canada, following surgery during 1974 through 1976. The three procedures differ markedly in the ease of prediction of the probability of complications and in the predictive importance of patient, hospital, and physician variables. The predictors worked fairly well for cholecystectomy, somewhat less well for hysterectomy, and not well at all for prostatectomy. Hospital variables were not generally important in the multiple logistic regressions. After controlling for case mix and type of surgery, physician surgical experience was found to account for relatively large differences (almost two to one) in the probability of patient complications following cholecystectomy. Cholecystectomy might be a candidate for certification because of the epidemiology of the operation. As of the mid-1970s, a substantial proportion of the cholecystectomies were being performed by physicians with comparatively little ongoing experience with this type of procedure. Moreover, a monitoring perspective identified one hospital with a significantly higher postcholecystectomy complication rate, even after physician experience was taken into account. Both identifying which procedures should be attended to and focusing on problems following surgery are important beyond Manitoba and highly relevant to such American requirements as Peer Review Organizations. Methods of increasing the efficiency of using claims data for quality assurance studies are outlined.
PubMed ID
3773578 View in PubMed
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[Complete and persistent cleansing: a major requirement for epitympanic surgeries].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201739
Source
Vestn Otorinolaringol. 1999;(3):31-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
V A Bystrenin
L V Bystrenina
Source
Vestn Otorinolaringol. 1999;(3):31-2
Date
1999
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abscess - pathology - surgery
Chronic Disease
Ear Diseases - pathology - surgery
Humans
Mastoid - surgery
Otitis Media, Suppurative - surgery
Russia
Surgical Procedures, Operative - standards
Tympanic Membrane - surgery
Tympanoplasty - methods
Abstract
Because in chronic purulent epitympanitis pyodestruction affects bone tissues with resultant chronic osteomyelitis of the temporal bone it is thought necessary to remove radically all the foci of chronic inflammation and to open all the compartments of the middle ear in any operation for epitympanitis. This is also relevant to operations performed to create a small trepanation cavity or new sound conduction system.
PubMed ID
10380606 View in PubMed
Less detail

Development of pediatric wait time access targets.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135829
Source
Can J Surg. 2011 Apr;54(2):107-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
James G Wright
Kayi Li
Cathy Seguin
Marilyn Booth
Peter Fitzgerald
Sarah Jones
Kellie K Leitch
Baxter Willis
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Robert B. Salter Chair of Pediatric Surgical Research, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ont., Canada. james.wright@sickkids.ca
Source
Can J Surg. 2011 Apr;54(2):107-10
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Delphi Technique
Health Care Rationing
Health Priorities
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Ontario
Pediatrics - organization & administration - standards
Referral and Consultation - standards
Surgical Procedures, Operative - standards - statistics & numerical data
Waiting Lists
Abstract
The effective management of wait times is a top priority for Canadians. Attention to date has largely focused on wait times for adult surgery. The purpose of this study was to develop surgical wait time access targets for children.
Using nominal group techniques, expert panels reached consensus on prioritization levels for 574 diagnoses in 10 surgical disciplines for wait 1 (W1; time from primary care visit to surgical consultation) and wait 2 (W2; time from decision to operate to receipt of surgery).
A 7-stage priority classification reflects the permissible timeframe for children to receive consultation (W1) or surgery (W2). Access targets by priority were linked to 574 diagnoses in 10 pediatric surgical subspecialties.
The pediatric surgical wait time access targets are a standardized, comprehensive and consensus-based model that can be systematically applied to children's hospitals across Canada. Future research and evaluation on outcomes from this model will evaluate improved access to pediatric surgical care.
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 May 2;162(9):1297-30010813011
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Oct 3;163(7):857-6011033717
Cites: BMJ. 1998 Jul 11;317(7151):139-429657797
Cites: BMJ. 2005 Sep 17;331(7517):631-316166137
Cites: CMAJ. 2006 Mar 14;174(6):794-616534086
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 Nov 4;179(10):1001-518981440
Comment In: Can J Surg. 2011 Apr;54(2):76-721443826
PubMed ID
21443828 View in PubMed
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[Discrepancy between education and clinical guidelines for groin hernia surgery].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114780
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2013 Apr 1;175(14):945-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2013
Author
Kristoffer Andresen
Michael Achiam
Jacob Rosenberg
Author Affiliation
Center for Perioperativ Optimering, Gastro­enheden - Kirurgisk Sektion, Herlev Hospital, Herlev Ringvej 75, 2730 Herlev, Denmark. kristofferandresen@gmail.com
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2013 Apr 1;175(14):945-8
Date
Apr-1-2013
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Hernia, Inguinal - surgery
Herniorrhaphy - education - methods - utilization
Humans
Laparoscopy - education - methods - utilization
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Surgical Procedures, Operative - standards
Abstract
Laparoscopic technique for groin hernia surgery has been used increasingly in Denmark during the latest ten years. This tendency is in accordance with both national and international guidelines, which recommend either laparoscopic repair or open repair ad modum Lichtenstein. The surgical training in Denmark has not kept up with this development, and in the surgical curriculum there is a lack of organized training in laparoscopic inguinal hernia surgery. This article discusses this discrepancy and suggests solutions to help solving the problems.
PubMed ID
23582066 View in PubMed
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45 records – page 1 of 5.