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[A common Scandinavian classification of surgery in future surgical registries?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233706
Source
Nord Med. 1988;103(5):176-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988

[Can we rely on Norwegian surgery data? A quality control at central and local hospitals of the procedure codes used in the survey on organization of gastrointestinal cancer surgery]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23117
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Aug 30;115(20):2555-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-1995
Author
O. Kindseth
H. Ostensen
O. Soreide
Author Affiliation
SINTEF Norsk institutt for sykehusforskning, Trondheim.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Aug 30;115(20):2555-8
Date
Aug-30-1995
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Databases, Factual - standards
Diagnosis-Related Groups
English Abstract
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - surgery
Humans
Norway
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Registries - standards
Surgical Procedures, Operative - classification
Abstract
The nation-wide register of hospital discharges in Norway includes ICD-9 and national procedure codes. Hospitals were asked to check five surgical procedures listed in the register against the primary data sources. 649 discharges were controlled. The response rate was 68%. The results indicate that the quality of the data in the register varies for the different procedures. For procedures with high volume (resection of rectum), the error in the register is 3%. This is the same as reported from other Nordic countries. The proportion of errors in the register was high in hospitals with only one registered procedure code. The quality of data can to some extent be checked on the basis of DRG coding (DRG group 468/477). Quality control of register data is required when the number in DRG 468/477 is high in the nation-wide register or when the number of specific procedures in hospitals is low.
PubMed ID
7676422 View in PubMed
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[Classification of surgical procedures, 2nd edition].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173278
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Aug 8;167(32):2919-20; author reply 2920
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-8-2005
Author
Jens Bartholdy
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Aug 8;167(32):2919-20; author reply 2920
Date
Aug-8-2005
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Databases as Topic
Denmark
Humans
Registries
Scandinavia
Surgical Procedures, Operative - classification
PubMed ID
16109220 View in PubMed
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Does it matter what a hospital is "high volume" for? Specificity of hospital volume-outcome associations for surgical procedures: analysis of administrative data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178085
Source
Qual Saf Health Care. 2004 Oct;13(5):379-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
D R Urbach
N N Baxter
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, 200 Elizabeth Street, 9EN-236A, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4, Canada. david.urbach@uhn.on.ca.
Source
Qual Saf Health Care. 2004 Oct;13(5):379-83
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - mortality - surgery
Colorectal Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Comorbidity
Esophagectomy - mortality - utilization
Health Policy
Health Services Research
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Pancreaticoduodenectomy - mortality - utilization
Surgery Department, Hospital - standards - utilization
Surgical Procedures, Operative - classification - mortality - utilization
Abstract
To determine whether the improved outcome of a surgical procedure in high volume hospitals is specific to the volume of the same procedure.
Analysis of secondary data in Ontario, Canada.
Patients having an oesophagectomy, colorectal resection for cancer, pancreaticoduodenectomy, major lung resection for cancer, or repair of an unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm between 1994 and 1999.
Odds ratio for death within 30 days of surgery in relation to the hospital volume of the same surgical procedure and the hospital volume of the other four procedures. Estimates were adjusted for age, sex, and comorbidity and accounted for hospital level clustering.
With the exception of colorectal resection, 30 day mortality seemed to be inversely related not only to the hospital volume of the same procedure but also to the hospital volume of most of the other procedures. In some cases the effect of the volume of a different procedure was stronger than the effect of the volume of the same procedure. For example, the association of mortality from pancreaticoduodenectomy with hospital volume of lung resection (odds ratio for death in hospitals with a high volume of lung resection compared with low volume 0.36, 95% confidence interval 0.23 to 0.57) was much stronger than the association of mortality from pancreaticoduodenectomy with hospital volume of pancreaticoduodenectomy (0.76, 0.44 to 1.32).
The inverse association between high volume of procedure and risk of operative death is not specific to the volume of the procedure being studied.
Notes
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Cites: Stat Med. 1998 Jun 15;17(11):1261-919670414
Cites: JAMA. 1998 Nov 25;280(20):1747-519842949
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Cites: CMAJ. 1999 Mar 9;160(5):643-810101998
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Cites: JAMA. 2000 Mar 1;283(9):1191-310703783
PubMed ID
15465942 View in PubMed
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Effects of a surgical pre-operative assessment clinic on patient care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222927
Source
Hosp Top. 1992;70(4):37-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
D D Persaud
U. Dawe
Author Affiliation
Calgary General Hospital, Alberta.
Source
Hosp Top. 1992;70(4):37-40
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Admitting Department, Hospital - organization & administration
Alberta - epidemiology
Efficiency
Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and over
Hospitals, Teaching - organization & administration - utilization
Humans
Interdepartmental Relations
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Preoperative Care - methods
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Surgery Department, Hospital - organization & administration
Surgical Procedures, Operative - classification - psychology
Abstract
Surgery makes many demands of both hospitals and patients. For the hospital, there are many procedural aspects: admission, health assessment, and patient education; the actual operation; and the post-surgical recovery period, a time when patients are susceptible to complications and nosocomial infections. For the patient, surgery means physical pain and emotional anxiety. A pre-operative assessment clinic (POAC), however, can assist both hospital and patients by streamlining their admission, assessment, and education, by decreasing the time they spend in the hospital recovering from surgery, and by easing their anxiety. In this article, the authors describe a study of a POAC at a Canadian hospital.
PubMed ID
10171275 View in PubMed
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Experience of development of the national surgical interventions coding system in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281795
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;202:95-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Julia I Shtevnina
Svetlana E Rauzina
Sergey L Shvyrev
Tatyana V Zarubina
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;202:95-8
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Electronic Health Records - standards
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Russia
Surgical Procedures, Operative - classification - standards
Terminology as Topic
Vocabulary, Controlled
Abstract
The paper discusses development issues of surgical procedures coding systems for use at the national and international levels within the health information systems. The work was carried out using the Russian and foreign experiences, including international standard ISO/FDIS 1828:2012. The development system structure contains basic categories of medical entities (axes): surgical deed and surgical subdeed, objects, site and interventional equipment. Abdominal surgeries (528 procedures) were entered in the coding system database and structured according defined categories.
PubMed ID
25000024 View in PubMed
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[Guidelines on registration of diagnoses and surgical interventions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201763
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 May 24;161(21):3109
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-24-1999
Author
P. Jørgensen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 May 24;161(21):3109
Date
May-24-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Humans
Registries - standards
Surgical Procedures, Operative - classification - methods - standards
PubMed ID
10377858 View in PubMed
Less detail

How did Finland's economic recession in the early 1990s affect socio-economic equity in the use of hospital care?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186431
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2003 Apr;56(7):1517-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Ilmo Keskimäki
Author Affiliation
Academy of Finland, Helsinki, Finland. ilmo.keskimaki@stakes.fi
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2003 Apr;56(7):1517-30
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Disease - classification
Female
Finland
Health Care Surveys
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Services Accessibility - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Hospitals, General - economics - utilization
Humans
Income - classification - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
National Health Programs
Patient Admission - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Social Justice
Socioeconomic Factors
Surgical Procedures, Operative - classification - economics - utilization
Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The study evaluates the changes in socio-economic equity in the use of general hospital care in Finland from the late 1980s to the mid 1990s. In the early 1990s the Finnish economy plunged into a deep recession which slashed over 10% of GDP and resulted in a 12% decrease in national health expenditure. At the same time, the administration and financing of specialised health services were reformed. The impact on general hospital care was controversial: budgets were reduced but better productivity increased the supply of many services. According to the study, data, based on individual linkage of nationwide hospital registers to disposable family income data in population censuses, overall acute general hospital admission rates among Finns aged 25-74 increased by over 10% from 1988 to 1996. For some surgical procedures, such as cataract, coronary revascularisation and some orthopaedic operations, rates more than doubled. In both years, lower-income groups generally used hospital care more than the better-off. However, there was a slight shift towards a pro-rich distribution, mainly due to a larger increase in surgical care among the high-income groups. In 1988 the lowest income quintile used 8% and in 1996 15% fewer operations than the highest. For individual procedures and surgical diagnostic categories, the general trends of increasing disparities were similar. Despite cuts in expenditures in the early 1990s, the Finnish general hospital system based on public funding and provision managed to increase the supply of services. However, this increase coincided with widening socio-economic discrepancies in the use of surgical services. The paper proposes that these increasing inequities were due to certain features of the Finnish health care system which create social discrepancies in access to hospital care. These include the high profile of the private sector in specialised ambulatory care and in the supply of some elective procedures, and semi-private public hospital services requiring supplementary payments from patients.
PubMed ID
12614702 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.