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1 Canadian Field Hospital in Haiti: surgical experience in earthquake relief.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122035
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Max Talbot
Bethann Meunier
Vincent Trottier
Michael Christian
Tracey Hillier
Chris Berger
Vivian McAlister
Scott Taylor
Author Affiliation
1 Canadian Field Hospital, Canadian Forces, Montreal, QC. max_talbot@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Earthquakes
Female
Haiti
Hospitals, Packaged - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Multiple Trauma - etiology - surgery
Operating Rooms
Relief Work - organization & administration
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Canadian Forces' (CF) deployable hospital, 1 Canadian Field Hospital, was deployed to Haiti after an earthquake that caused massive devastation. Two surgical teams performed 167 operations over a 39-day period starting 17 days after the index event. Most operations were unrelated to the earthquake. Replacing or supplementing the destroyed local surgical capacity for a brief period after a disaster can be a valuable contribution to relief efforts. For future humanitarian operations/disaster response missions, the CF will study the feasibility of accelerating the deployment of surgical capabilities.
Notes
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Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2008 Mar-Apr;23(2):144-51; discussion 152-318557294
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PubMed ID
22854149 View in PubMed
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A 30-year survey of pulmonary embolism verified at autopsy: an analysis of 1274 surgical patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239210
Source
Br J Surg. 1985 Feb;72(2):105-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1985
Author
D. Bergqvist
B. Lindblad
Source
Br J Surg. 1985 Feb;72(2):105-8
Date
Feb-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Autopsy
Humans
Length of Stay
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Postoperative Period
Pulmonary Embolism - epidemiology - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Surgical Procedures, Operative
Sweden
Abstract
A retrospective study was undertaken of all surgical patients in Malmö, Sweden, during the period 1951-1980, in whom pulmonary emboli were found at autopsy. The autopsy rate was high throughout the period, ranging from 73 to 100 per cent. Of 5477 patients who died during the period, 1274 had pulmonary emboli (23.6 per cent), 349 of which were considered fatal, 353 contributory to death and 572 incidental. Fifty-one per cent of the patients were not operated upon. The number of contributory and incidental emboli increased over the period, to some extent probably reflecting greater thoroughness in postmortems. The frequency of fatal pulmonary emboli decreased in the last 5 year period. Pulmonary embolism was more rare in patients under 50 years of age. The proportion of females increased. In 24 cases major embolism emanated from thrombi around central venous catheters. This retrospective analysis of a large number of patients shows that pulmonary embolism continues to be a major cause of death in surgical patients, and in Malmö as common a cause of death in operated as in nonoperated patients.
PubMed ID
3971113 View in PubMed
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1976 Davis & Geck surgical essay. The delayed hypersensitivity response: clinical application in surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250317
Source
Can J Surg. 1977 Jan;20(1):15-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1977
Author
J B Pietsch
J L Meakins
Source
Can J Surg. 1977 Jan;20(1):15-21
Date
Jan-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Delayed
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis - mortality
Quebec
Sepsis - diagnosis
Skin Tests
Surgical Procedures, Operative
Surgical Wound Infection - diagnosis
Abstract
The detection of anergy or relative anergy by delayed hypersensitivity skin tests was predictive of infection and related mortality in 354 surgical patients. Cancer or advanced age alone did not account for the increased morbidity and mortality seen in this study. Altered delayed hypersensitivity response is a reflection of abnormalities in cell-mediated immunity and possibly humoral or phagocytic defects, or both. Skin testing is of value to the clinical surgeon both in identifying the population at risk and in monitoring the immune response to therapy in the seriously ill patient. Failure to improve skin-test response may indicate underlying infection or malnutrition, which, if untreated, results in a high mortality.
PubMed ID
832199 View in PubMed
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[Abbreviated surgical stay programs--a professional and administrative challenge].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195039
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Mar 10;121(7):812-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-2001
Author
H. Kehlet
Author Affiliation
Kirurgisk sektion 435 Gastroenheden H:S Hvidovre Hospital DK-2650 Hvidovre.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Mar 10;121(7):812-5
Date
Mar-10-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Convalescence
Humans
Length of Stay
Norway
Patient Discharge
Patient Education as Topic
Postoperative Care - economics - methods - standards
Preoperative Care - economics - methods - standards
Stress, Psychological
Surgical Procedures, Operative - adverse effects - economics - methods - standards
Time Factors
Abstract
Accelerated surgical stay programs represent a multi-modal, multi-disciplinary concept to reduce postoperative morbidity, hospitalisation and convalescence based upon recent advantages in surgical pathophysiology and pain treatment. Preliminary data from a variety of surgical procedures suggest major improvements in quality of surgical care and cost reduction and call for further controlled or large-size multicenter studies.
PubMed ID
11301705 View in PubMed
Less detail

Academic performance in adolescence after inguinal hernia repair in infancy: a nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136563
Source
Anesthesiology. 2011 May;114(5):1076-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Tom G Hansen
Jacob K Pedersen
Steen W Henneberg
Dorthe A Pedersen
Jeffrey C Murray
Neil S Morton
Kaare Christensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. tomghansen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Anesthesiology. 2011 May;114(5):1076-85
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Anesthesia - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Causality
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Hernia, Inguinal - surgery
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Odds Ratio
Surgical Procedures, Operative - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Although animal studies have indicated that general anesthetics may result in widespread apoptotic neurodegeneration and neurocognitive impairment in the developing brain, results from human studies are scarce. We investigated the association between exposure to surgery and anesthesia for inguinal hernia repair in infancy and subsequent academic performance.
Using Danish birth cohorts from 1986-1990, we compared the academic performance of all children who had undergone inguinal hernia repair in infancy to a randomly selected, age-matched 5% population sample. Primary analysis compared average test scores at ninth grade adjusting for sex, birth weight, and paternal and maternal age and education. Secondary analysis compared the proportions of children not attaining test scores between the two groups.
From 1986-1990 in Denmark, 2,689 children underwent inguinal hernia repair in infancy. A randomly selected, age-matched 5% population sample consists of 14,575 individuals. Although the exposure group performed worse than the control group (average score 0.26 lower; 95% CI, 0.21-0.31), after adjusting for known confounders, no statistically significant difference (-0.04; 95% CI, -0.09 to 0.01) between the exposure and control groups could be demonstrated. However, the odds ratio for test score nonattainment associated with inguinal hernia repair was 1.18 (95% CI, 1.04-1.35). Excluding from analyses children with other congenital malformations, the difference in mean test scores remained nearly unchanged (0.05; 95% CI, 0.00-0.11). In addition, the increased proportion of test score nonattainment within the exposure group was attenuated (odds ratio = 1.13; 95% CI, 0.98-1.31).
In the ethnically and socioeconomically homogeneous Danish population, we found no evidence that a single, relatively brief anesthetic exposure in connection with hernia repair in infancy reduced academic performance at age 15 or 16 yr after adjusting for known confounding factors. However, the higher test score nonattainment rate among the hernia group could suggest that a subgroup of these children are developmentally disadvantaged compared with the background population.
Notes
Comment In: Anesthesiology. 2011 Dec;115(6):1387; author reply 1387-822108309
PubMed ID
21368654 View in PubMed
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[Accelerated surgical stay programs. A professional and administrative challenge].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195646
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Jan 22;163(4):420-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-22-2001
Author
H. Kehlet
Author Affiliation
H:S Hvidovre Hospital, gastroenheden, kirurgisk afsnit.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Jan 22;163(4):420-4
Date
Jan-22-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Convalescence
Denmark
Humans
Length of Stay
Patient Discharge
Patient Education as Topic
Postoperative Care - economics - methods - standards
Preoperative Care - economics - methods - standards
Stress, Psychological
Surgical Procedures, Operative - adverse effects - economics - methods - standards
Time Factors
Abstract
Accelerated surgical stay programs represent a multi-modal, multi-disciplinary concept to reduce postoperative morbidity, hospitalisation and convalescence based upon recent advantages in surgical pathophysiology and pain treatment. Preliminary data from a variety of surgical procedures suggest major improvements in quality of surgical care and cost reduction and call for further controlled or large-size multi-center studies.
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Jan 22;163(4):41511218774
PubMed ID
11218776 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Accidents, complications and patients' complaints as causes for surgical corrections].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209487
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Jan 30;117(3):398-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-1997

Achieving the National Quality Forum's "Never Events": prevention of wrong site, wrong procedure, and wrong patient operations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164254
Source
Ann Surg. 2007 Apr;245(4):526-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Robert K Michaels
Martin A Makary
Yasser Dahab
Frank J Frassica
Eugenie Heitmiller
Lisa C Rowen
Richard Crotreau
Henry Brem
Peter J Pronovost
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA.
Source
Ann Surg. 2007 Apr;245(4):526-32
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Protocols
Humans
Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations
Medical Errors - prevention & control
Medical Laboratory Science
Risk factors
Safety
Safety Management - methods
Societies, Medical
Surgery Department, Hospital - organization & administration - standards
Surgical Procedures, Operative - standards
United States
United States Department of Veterans Affairs
Abstract
Review the evidence regarding methods to prevent wrong site operations and present a framework that healthcare organizations can use to evaluate whether they have reduced the probability of wrong site, wrong procedure, and wrong patient operations.
Operations involving the wrong site, patient, and procedure continue despite national efforts by regulators and professional organizations. Little is known about effective policies to reduce these "never events," and healthcare professional's knowledge or appropriate use of these policies to mitigate events.
A literature review of the evidence was performed using PubMed and Google; key words used were wrong site surgery, wrong side surgery, wrong patient surgery, and wrong procedure surgery. The framework to evaluate safety includes assessing if a behaviorally specific policy or procedure exists, whether staff knows about the policy, and whether the policy is being used appropriately.
Higher-level policies or programs have been implemented by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery, Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, Veteran's Health Administration, Canadian Orthopaedic, and the North American Spine Society Associations to reduce wrong site surgery. No scientific evidence is available to guide hospitals in evaluating whether they have an effective policy, and whether staff know of the policy and appropriately use the policy to prevent "never events."
There is limited evidence of behavioral interventions to reduce wrong site, patient, and surgical procedures. We have outlined a framework of measures that healthcare organizations can use to start evaluating whether they have reduced adverse events in operations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17414599 View in PubMed
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620 records – page 1 of 62.