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A 3-year follow-up after anterior colporrhaphy compared with collagen-coated transvaginal mesh for anterior vaginal wall prolapse: a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272920
Source
BJOG. 2016 Jan;123(1):136-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
M. Rudnicki
E. Laurikainen
R. Pogosean
I. Kinne
U. Jakobsson
P. Teleman
Source
BJOG. 2016 Jan;123(1):136-42
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Collagen
Denmark - epidemiology
Dyspareunia - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Gynecologic Surgical Procedures - instrumentation - methods
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Pelvic Organ Prolapse - epidemiology - surgery
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Surgical Mesh
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Vagina - surgery
Abstract
To compare the 1-year (previously published) and 3-year objective and subjective cure rates, and complications, related to the use of a collagen-coated transvaginal mesh for anterior vaginal wall prolapse against a conventional anterior repair.
Randomised controlled study.
Six departments of obstetrics and gynaecology in Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Denmark.
A total of 138 women, of 55 years of age or older, admitted for stage =2 anterior vaginal wall prolapse.
The women scheduled for primary anterior vaginal wall prolapse surgery were randomised between conventional anterior colporrhaphy and surgery with a collagen-coated prolene mesh. All patients were evaluated using the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POP-Q) assessment before and after surgery. Symptoms related to pelvic organ prolapse were evaluated using the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire (PFIQ-7) and the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory (PFDI-20).
Objective cure, defined as POP-Q stage
PubMed ID
26420345 View in PubMed
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Analysis of robotic performance times to improve operative efficiency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119082
Source
J Minim Invasive Gynecol. 2013 Jan-Feb;20(1):43-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Elizabeth J Geller
Feng-Chang Lin
Catherine A Matthews
Author Affiliation
Division of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7570, USA. egeller@med.unc.edu
Source
J Minim Invasive Gynecol. 2013 Jan-Feb;20(1):43-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Efficiency
Female
Humans
Hysterectomy - methods
Learning Curve
Pelvic Organ Prolapse - surgery
Retrospective Studies
Robotics - methods
Surgical Mesh
Task Performance and Analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
To estimate the efficiency of procedural steps in robotic sacrocolpopexy and concomitant hysterectomy.
Retrospective study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2).
University hospital.
One hundred forty-seven patients who underwent robotic-assisted procedures from November 2007 through December 2010.
Robotic-assisted sacrocolpopexy. Sixty patients (40.8%) underwent concomitant hysterectomy; 37 (25.2%), mid-urethral sling placement; and 7 (4.8%), concomitant colporrhaphy.
Comparison of the first 20 procedures with the subsequent 127 demonstrated that there was considerable improvement in time of cuff closure (p = .04); sacral dissection (p = .004); anterior (p = .006), posterior, (p = .003), and sacral (p = .003) mesh attachment; peritoneal closure (p
PubMed ID
23141423 View in PubMed
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An innovative abdominal wall repair technique for infected prosthesis: the Eskimo technique.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131124
Source
Ulus Travma Acil Cerrahi Derg. 2011 Jul;17(4):354-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Federico Coccolini
Fausto Catena
Luca Ansaloni
Flavia Neri
Filippo Gazzotti
Daniel Lazzareschi
Antonio Daniele Pinna
Author Affiliation
Department of General, Emergency and Transplant Surgery, Sant?Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Bologna, Italy. fedecocco@iol.it
Source
Ulus Travma Acil Cerrahi Derg. 2011 Jul;17(4):354-8
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bioprosthesis
Diagnosis, Differential
Hernia, Ventral - pathology - surgery
Humans
Male
Prosthesis Implantation
Prosthesis-Related Infections - diagnosis - surgery
Reoperation
Surgical Mesh - adverse effects
Abstract
The use of meshes to repair incisional hernias has been shown to reduce the recurrence rate, though it may increase the risk of surgical site infection. This is one of the most feared and devastating complications of surgical abdominal wall repair. The aim of this work is to describe a new surgical technique that was used to treat two patients suffering from chronic prosthesis infection. Additionally, the outcome of this procedure will be analyzed in terms of its safety, subsequent site infection and recurrence prevention. Two case reports are presented. The procedure was based on a wide surgical excision of the infected prosthesis and the surrounding tissues, plus abdominal wall repair with biological prosthesis. Both patients experienced an uneventful postoperative course. Infection of the surgical site resolved following the procedure and, after a mean follow-up of 36 months, no recurrences of the incisional hernia had occurred. This unique surgical technique not only proved to be safe, but it also solved the chronic prosthesis infection through its use of radical excision, without any postoperative complications or recurrence. This technique confirmed that biological prostheses can be used safely and effectively for implantation in sites of infection.
PubMed ID
21935836 View in PubMed
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Anterior colporrhaphy compared with collagen-coated transvaginal mesh for anterior vaginal wall prolapse: a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106735
Source
BJOG. 2014 Jan;121(1):102-10; discussion 110-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
M. Rudnicki
E. Laurikainen
R. Pogosean
I. Kinne
U. Jakobsson
P. Teleman
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Roskilde University Hospital, Roskilde, Denmark.
Source
BJOG. 2014 Jan;121(1):102-10; discussion 110-1
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Collagen
Cystocele - surgery
Denmark
Female
Finland
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Sexuality
Surgical Mesh
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Vagina - surgery
Abstract
To investigate the anatomical cure rate and complications related to collagen-coated mesh for cystocele, compared with a conventional anterior colporrhaphy.
A randomised controlled study.
Six departments of obstetrics and gynaecology in Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Denmark.
Women aged 55 years or older, referred for surgery with a prolapse of the anterior vaginal wall of stage 2 or higher.
Women scheduled for primary cystocoele surgery were randomised to either anterior colporrhaphy or a collagen-coated Prolene mesh. Power analysis indicated that 130 patients had to be randomised. All patients were evaluated using the Pelvic Organ Prolapse-Quantification (POP-Q) measurement. Quality of life, symptoms, and sexual function were evaluated using the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire, the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory, and the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire.
The primary outcome was objective cure, defined as prolapse below POP-Q stage 2 at the 12-months follow-up. Secondary outcomes were quality of life, symptoms, and presence (or not) of complications.
In total, 161 women were randomised to either anterior colporrhaphy or mesh (participant ages 64.9 ± 6.4 years versus 64.7 ± 6.6 years, respectively; mean ± SD). The objective cure rate was 39.8% (95% CI 28.6-50.9%) in the anterior colporrhaphy group, compared with 88.1% (95% CI 80.7-95.6%) in the mesh group (P
PubMed ID
24118844 View in PubMed
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Can the PFDI (Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory) or PFIQ (Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaires) be used to predict outcome in pelvic reconstructive surgery?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107420
Source
Prog Urol. 2013 Sep;23(11):940-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
V. Letouzey
G. Mercier
S. Adjoussou
E. Bohoussou
P. Mares
R. de Tayrac
Author Affiliation
Gynecology and obstetrics department, Caremeau university hospital, place Pr R.-Debré, 30900 Nimes, France. Electronic address: Vincent.go@wanadoo.fr.
Source
Prog Urol. 2013 Sep;23(11):940-5
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Colposcopy - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Pelvic Floor - physiopathology - surgery
Pelvic Organ Prolapse - diagnosis - physiopathology - surgery
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Surgical Mesh
Treatment Outcome
Uterine Prolapse - physiopathology - surgery
Vagina - surgery
Abstract
To determine a syndrome score threshold on PFDI or PFIQ predictive of a significant improvement in post-operative functional results.
A retrospective case review (Canadian Task Force Classification II-2).
University and research hospital.
Women diagnosed with pelvic organ prolapse and repaired with synthetic vaginal mesh.
Quality of life was arbitrarily considered to have improved significantly if the score decreases by more than 50% between pre-operatively and 36 months post-operatively. We investigated the pre-operative cut-off score predictive of no quality of life improvement at M36 from a prospective trial for surgical pelvic organ prolapse treatment.
The most accurate pre-operative cut-off score predicting a failure to improve quality of life at 36 months post-operatively was 62/300 (PFDI Score). This cut-off value had a positive predictive value of 83.6% and specificity of 62.1%. No significant threshold was obtained from the PFIQ score.
The intensity of symptoms before surgery may interfere as a predictive factor for outcome.
PubMed ID
24010925 View in PubMed
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Cost analysis of incisional hernia repair by suture or mesh.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71260
Source
Hernia. 2003 Sep;7(3):114-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
L A Israelsson
L. Jönsson
A. Wimo
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery and Perioperative Science, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. leif.israelsson@lvn.se
Source
Hernia. 2003 Sep;7(3):114-7
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Costs
Hernia, Ventral - economics - surgery
Humans
Laparotomy - economics - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Probability
Retrospective Studies
Surgical Mesh - economics
Suture Techniques - economics
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The objective was to make a cost analysis of incisional hernia repair by suture repair or prosthetic mesh repair. The study included 44 patients who underwent hernia repair between 1991 and 2000. The rate of recurrent incisional hernia after more than 1 year with associated costs was registered. In 1996, the technique of incisional hernia repair was changed from suture repair to mesh repair. With a mesh repair, zero out of 19 patients presented with a recurrence at follow-up, and with suture repair, five out of 13 had a recurrence (P
PubMed ID
12942344 View in PubMed
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A cost and outcome comparison between laparoscopic and Lichtenstein hernia operations in a day-case unit. A randomized prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204534
Source
Surg Endosc. 1998 Oct;12(10):1199-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
T J Heikkinen
K. Haukipuro
A. Hulkko
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, SF-90220 Oulu, Finland.
Source
Surg Endosc. 1998 Oct;12(10):1199-203
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures - economics - methods
Digestive System Surgical Procedures - economics - methods
Female
Finland
Hernia, Inguinal - economics - surgery
Hospital Costs
Humans
Laparoscopy - economics - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Statistics, nonparametric
Surgical Mesh
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Laparoscopic hernia repair has often been criticized for its high costs.
To compare the costs of laparoscopic and open hernia repair, 40 patients were randomized for either transabdominal laparoscopic or Lichtenstein mesh repair (under local anesthesia) in a day-case surgery unit.
Median operative times for the laparoscopic and open groups were 62 and 65 min, respectively. Postoperative pain was comparable for the two groups. The period before return to normal life was 14 days in the laparoscopic group and 21 days in the open group. The hospital costs were 2051 FIM ($1 US = 4.6 FIM) higher in the laparoscopic group, but the total costs for employed patients (including expenses due to lost work days) were lower.
Although the Lichtenstein operation is cheaper for the hospital, the total costs for working patients are lower with the laparoscopic technique, when the cost of lost work days is factored into overall expense.
Notes
Comment On: Surg Endosc. 1998 Oct;12(10):1197-89745055
PubMed ID
9745056 View in PubMed
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A cost-effectiveness analysis of tension-free vaginal tape versus laparoscopic mesh colposuspension for primary female stress incontinence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165431
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2006;85(12):1485-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Antti Valpas
Pekka Rissanen
Erkki Kujansuu
Carl-Gustaf Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. antti.valpas@ekshp.fi
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2006;85(12):1485-90
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colposcopy - economics - methods
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Costs
Humans
Length of Stay
Postoperative Complications - economics - epidemiology
Quality of Life
Surgical Mesh - economics
Surgical Tape - economics
Treatment Outcome
Urinary Incontinence, Stress - economics - surgery
Vagina - surgery
Abstract
Evaluation of cost-effectiveness of new surgical techniques is important. As the data on incontinence procedures are scarce, we evaluated the cost-effectiveness of tension-free vaginal tape procedure and laparoscopic mesh colposuspension as a primary surgical treatment for female stress urinary incontinence.
In four university teaching hospitals and two central hospitals 128 stress incontinent women were randomized to tension-free vaginal tape procedure (n=70) or laparoscopic mesh colposuspension (n=51) in order to investigate the clinical performance of these two procedures. Primary objective clinical outcome measures were: stress test and 48-h pad test. Secondary subjective outcome measures were health-related quality of life measured in terms of visual analogue scale and Urinary Incontinence Severity Score. Alongside the clinical trial, a cost-effectiveness analysis for the main outcome measures was performed.
The changes in the 48-h pad test result did not reach statistical significance (p=0.105). When the visual analogue scale or Urinary Incontinence Severity Score are used as the outcome measure, the tension-free vaginal tape is more cost-effective than laparoscopic mesh colposuspension over a follow-up period of one year (p
PubMed ID
17260226 View in PubMed
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Cost effectiveness of mesh prophylaxis to prevent parastomal hernia in patients undergoing permanent colostomy for rectal cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106255
Source
J Am Coll Surg. 2014 Jan;218(1):82-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Lawrence Lee
Abdulaziz Saleem
Tara Landry
Eric Latimer
Prosanto Chaudhury
Liane S Feldman
Author Affiliation
Steinberg-Bernstein Centre for Minimally-Invasive Surgery and Innovation, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Surgery, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Am Coll Surg. 2014 Jan;218(1):82-91
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Colostomy - economics - instrumentation - methods
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Hernia, Ventral - economics - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Markov Chains
Middle Aged
Models, Economic
Neoplasm Staging
Postoperative Complications - economics - prevention & control
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Rectal Neoplasms - pathology - surgery
Surgical Mesh - economics
Surgical Stomas
Abstract
Parastomal hernia (PSH) is common after stoma formation. Studies have reported that mesh prophylaxis reduces PSH, but there are no cost-effectiveness data. Our objective was to determine the cost effectiveness of mesh prophylaxis vs no prophylaxis to prevent PSH in patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection with permanent colostomy for rectal cancer.
Using a cohort Markov model, we modeled the costs and effectiveness of mesh prophylaxis vs no prophylaxis at the index operation in a cohort of 60-year-old patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection for rectal cancer during a time horizon of 5 years. Costs were expressed in 2012 Canadian dollars (CAD$) and effectiveness in quality-adjusted life years. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed.
In patients with stage I to III rectal cancer, prophylactic mesh was dominant (less costly and more effective) compared with no mesh. In patients with stage IV disease, mesh prophylaxis was associated with higher cost (CAD$495 more) and minimally increased effectiveness (0.05 additional quality-adjusted life years), resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of CAD$10,818 per quality-adjusted life year. On sensitivity analyses, the decision was sensitive to the probability of mesh infection and the cost of the mesh, and method of diagnosing PSH.
In patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection with permanent colostomy for rectal cancer, mesh prophylaxis might be the less costly and more effective strategy compared with no mesh to prevent PSH in patients with stage I to III disease, and might be cost effective in patients with stage IV disease.
PubMed ID
24210147 View in PubMed
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Discomfort five years after laparoscopic and Shouldice inguinal hernia repair: a randomised trial with 867 patients. A report from the SMIL study group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164095
Source
Hernia. 2007 Aug;11(4):307-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Fritz H Berndsen
U. Petersson
D. Arvidsson
C-E Leijonmarck
C. Rudberg
S. Smedberg
A. Montgomery
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Akranes Hospital, 300 Akranes, Iceland. fritz.berndsen@simnet.is
Source
Hernia. 2007 Aug;11(4):307-13
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Follow-Up Studies
Hernia, Inguinal - psychology - surgery
Humans
Incidence
Laparoscopy - adverse effects - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Pain, Postoperative - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Patient satisfaction
Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - methods
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Surgical Mesh
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
In recent years long-term discomfort after inguinal hernia surgery has become an issue of great concern to hernia surgeons. Long-term results on discomfort from large randomised studies are sparse.
One-thousand one-hundred and eighty-three patients were randomised in a multicentre trial with the primary aim of comparing recurrence rates after laparoscopic TAPP and Shouldice repair. Evaluating late discomfort and its possible risk factors were secondary objectives, and are reported here. The patients were clinically examined after 1 and 5 years, and answered questionnaires 2 and 3 years postoperation.
Of 1,068 operated patients, 867 were eligible for analysis after 5 years (81.2%). The percentage of patients experiencing discomfort of any kind were 8.5% in the TAPP group and 11.4% (p = 0.156) in the Shouldice group. Although discomfort was usually mild it was severe for 0.2 and 0.7%, respectively. Severe pain the first postoperative week was a risk factor for late discomfort in the Shouldice group (OR 2.25, P = 0.022) but not in the TAPP group. No other risk factor for late discomfort was found.
There was no difference between late discomfort at five-year follow-up after laparoscopic TAPP and Shouldice repair. Discomfort was mostly mild and pain during the first postoperative week was a prognostic variable for late discomfort in Shouldice patients.
Notes
Comment In: Hernia. 2008 Aug;12(4):445-618270787
PubMed ID
17440795 View in PubMed
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76 records – page 1 of 8.