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92 records – page 1 of 10.

Adaptation of pharyngeal wall adduction after pharyngeal flap surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33381
Source
Cleft Palate Craniofac J. 1999 Mar;36(2):166-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
J. Karling
G. Henningsson
O. Larson
A. Isberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Logopedics and Phoniatrics, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. jkng@ent.ks.se
Source
Cleft Palate Craniofac J. 1999 Mar;36(2):166-72
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Endoscopy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Movement
Pharyngeal Muscles - physiology
Pharynx - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics, nonparametric
Surgical Flaps
Treatment Outcome
Velopharyngeal Insufficiency - physiopathology - surgery
Video Recording
Voice Disorders - surgery
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this investigation was to study lateral pharyngeal wall adduction relative to pharyngeal flaps of different widths. The hypothesis to be tested was that pharyngeal wall adduction does not increase postoperatively but may decrease due to the mechanical hindrance of a wide flap. DESIGN: In this prospective study, adaptation of lateral pharyngeal wall adduction during speech was studied relative to pharyngeal flaps of different widths utilizing videoradiography. Flap width was determined nasopharyngoscopically. SETTING: All patients were treated by the Stockholm Cleft Palate Team, Sweden. PATIENTS: Fifty-three patients were strictly selected by discarding conditions known to exert uncontrolled influence on velopharyngeal sphincter function. RESULTS: The results revealed a potential for adaptation of pharyngeal wall adduction to different flap widths. The magnitude and character (increase or decrease) of change in adduction was significantly correlated with the degree of preoperative adduction and with the width of the flap. In patients with limited preoperative adduction, pharyngeal wall activity increased, more in the presence of a narrow flap while less if the flap was wide. When preoperative adduction was pronounced, the postoperative activity decreased because of mechanical hindrance by the flap, and the degree of impediment was correlated to the width of the flap. CONCLUSION: A potential for increased lateral pharyngeal wall adduction after pharyngeal flap surgery was verified, but the result cannot be interpreted as generally applicable because of the strict selection of patients.
PubMed ID
10213063 View in PubMed
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[Amputation of the nose resulting from human bites].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243335
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1982 Mar 15;144(11):794-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1982
Author
B. Erichsen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1982 Mar 15;144(11):794-6
Date
Mar-15-1982
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bites, Human
Humans
Inuits
Male
Nose Deformities, Acquired - etiology - surgery
Surgical Flaps
PubMed ID
7101507 View in PubMed
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Angiosome-targeted infrapopliteal endovascular revascularization for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118329
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2013 Feb;57(2):427-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Maria Söderström
Anders Albäck
Fausto Biancari
Kimmo Lappalainen
Mauri Lepäntalo
Maarit Venermo
Author Affiliation
Department of Vascular Surgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. maria.soderstrom@hus.fi
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2013 Feb;57(2):427-35
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Amputation
Angioplasty, Balloon - adverse effects - mortality
Anti-Infective Agents - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Debridement
Diabetic Foot - mortality - physiopathology - radiography - therapy
Female
Finland
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Limb Salvage
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy
Peripheral Arterial Disease - mortality - physiopathology - radiography - therapy
Popliteal Artery - physiopathology - radiography
Propensity Score
Proportional Hazards Models
Regional Blood Flow
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Skin Transplantation
Surgical Flaps
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Wound Healing
Abstract
Because of the prolonged healing time of diabetic foot ulcers, methods for identifying ways to expedite the ulcer healing process are needed. The angiosome concept delineates the body into three-dimensional blocks of tissue fed by specific source arteries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefit of infrapopliteal endovascular revascularization guided by an angiosome model of perfusion in the healing process of diabetic foot ulcers.
A total of 250 consecutive legs with diabetic foot ulcers in 226 patients who had undergone infrapopliteal endovascular revascularization in a single center were evaluated. Patient records and periprocedural leg angiograms were reviewed. The legs were divided into two groups depending on whether direct arterial flow to the site of the foot ulcer based on the angiosome concept was achieved (direct group) or not achieved (indirect group). Ulcer healing time was compared between the two groups. A propensity score was used for adjustment of differences in pretreatment covariables in multivariate analysis and for 1:1 matching.
Direct flow to the angiosome feeding the ulcer area was achieved in 121 legs (48%) compared with indirect revascularization in 129 legs. Foot ulcers treated with angiosome-targeted infrapopliteal percutaneous transluminal angioplasty healed better. The ulcer healing rate was mean (standard deviation) 72% (5%) at 12 months for the direct group compared with 45% (6%) for the indirect group (P
PubMed ID
23219512 View in PubMed
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[Application of trans-sternum occlusion of the main bronchus stump using transdiaphragmatic omentopexy for post-pneumonectomy bronchial fistula]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53944
Source
Klin Khir. 2000 May;(5):56-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000

Autotransplantation of 45 teeth to the upper incisor region in adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36006
Source
Swed Dent J. 1994;18(5):165-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
R. Kugelberg
U. Tegsjö
O. Malmgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthodontics, Eastmaninstitutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 1994;18(5):165-72
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incisor - abnormalities - injuries
Male
Maxilla
Surgical Flaps
Tooth - transplantation
Tooth Loss - surgery
Transplantation, Autologous
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Young, growing individuals with one or more upper incisors missing due to trauma, agenesis or extraction of abnormal teeth can be treated with autotransplantation to restore aesthetics and function and to preserve the volume of the alveolar process. Studies have been performed to evaluate the prognosis, indicating a good prognosis, especially if an immature transplant is available, developed to 3/4 of the full root length. The purpose of this study was to analyse the result of all autotransplantation of teeth performed to the upper incisor region between 1979 and 1990 at the Department of Oral Surgery, Eastmaninstitutet, Stockholm, Sweden. The material consists of 23 immature and 22 mature teeth in 40 patients with a mean age of 12 years. They were systematically followed up clinically and roentgenologically for up to four years after surgery. 22 of the 23 immature (96%) and 18 of the 22 mature teeth (82%) were observed to be without serious complications. The complications occurred, with one exception, within the first year of observation. The conclusion drawn from this study is that autotransplantation to the upper incisor region can be performed with a good prognosis, both for mature and immature teeth.
PubMed ID
7871476 View in PubMed
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Breast reconstruction after mastectomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25963
Source
Acta Oncol. 1988;27(6A):687-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
C. Krag
Author Affiliation
Department of Plastic Surgery B, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1988;27(6A):687-90
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast - surgery
Female
Humans
Mastectomy - rehabilitation
Prostheses and Implants
Surgery, Plastic - methods
Surgical Flaps
Abstract
In Denmark mastectomized women have shown an increasing interest in breast reconstruction. Secondary reconstruction one year after completed oncologic treatment is recommended. Patients are selected in collaboration with the oncologic treatment centers mainly from the group with localized (stage I) disease. Reconstruction of the breast dome is most commonly accomplished by submuscular implantation of a soft silicone prosthesis, often preceded by tissue expansion or combined with transfer of a musculocutaneous flap. In some cases flap transfer may provide sufficient bulk to eliminate the need for a prosthesis. Reconstruction of the nipple-areola complex is performed some months later, when symmetry in breast volume and placement has been established. Altogether the reconstructions may take 1/2-1 year in uncomplicated cases depending on the method used. The cosmetic results achieved are sufficiently good to warrant a recommendation that reconstructive surgery should be available--according to need--as an integral part of the treatment of women with breast cancer.
PubMed ID
3219222 View in PubMed
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Breast reconstruction--past achievements, current status and future goals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23201
Source
Scand J Plast Reconstr Surg Hand Surg. 1995 Jun;29(2):81-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
M. Wickman
Author Affiliation
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Plast Reconstr Surg Hand Surg. 1995 Jun;29(2):81-100
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Implants
Female
Humans
Mammaplasty
Mastectomy
Mastectomy, Segmental
Middle Aged
Nipples - surgery
Prostheses and Implants
Surgical Flaps
Abstract
Breast cancer is the most common malignant tumour in women, and more than 5000 new cases are discovered each year in Sweden, this means that one woman in nine will be treated for breast cancer during her lifetime. For unknown reasons, the incidence increases by 1% each year. Partial mastectomy is the most common surgical treatment today, but a large number of women undergo mastectomy--that is, excision of all breast tissue including the nipple-areola complex with or without an axillary biopsy. Radical mastectomy--that is the Halsted mastectomy with excision of the pectoral muscles (51)--is almost never done today, so chest wall defects are smaller than in the early days of breast reconstruction. There is, however, still a demand from patients for good, natural-looking, and longlasting breast reconstructions, and reconstructive surgeons have to search for perfection both in existing methods and also in new methods of breast reconstruction. The purpose of this article is to review this complex subject.
PubMed ID
7569818 View in PubMed
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Breast reconstruction: review of surgical methods and spectrum of imaging findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115678
Source
Radiographics. 2013 Mar-Apr;33(2):435-53
Publication Type
Article
Author
Fanny Maud Pinel-Giroux
Mona M El Khoury
Isabelle Trop
Christina Bernier
Julie David
Lucie Lalonde
Author Affiliation
Departments of Radiology and Plastic Surgery, Hôtel-Dieu de Montréal, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, 3840 rue Saint-Urbain, Montréal, QC, Canada H2W 1T8. fannypg@videotron.ca
Source
Radiographics. 2013 Mar-Apr;33(2):435-53
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Implants - statistics & numerical data
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - surgery
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - statistics & numerical data
Mastectomy - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Surgical Flaps - statistics & numerical data
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Breast reconstruction after mastectomy is often requested by women with breast cancer who are ineligible for breast-conserving therapy and women with a high genetic risk for breast cancer. Current breast reconstruction techniques are diverse and may involve the use of an autologous tissue flap, a prosthetic implant, or both. Regardless of the technique used, cancer may recur in the reconstructed breast; in addition, in breasts reconstructed with autologous tissue flaps, benign complications such as fat necrosis may occur. To detect breast cancer recurrences at a smaller size than can be appreciated clinically and as early as possible without evidence of metastasis, radiologists must be familiar with the range of normal and abnormal imaging appearances of reconstructed breasts, including features of benign complications as well as those of malignant change. Images representing this spectrum of findings were selected from the clinical records of 119 women who underwent breast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at the authors' institution between January 2009 and March 2011, after mastectomy and breast reconstruction. In 32 of 37 women with abnormal findings on MR images, only benign changes were found at further diagnostic workup; in the other five, recurrent breast cancer was found at biopsy. Four of the five had been treated initially for invasive carcinoma, and one, for multifocal ductal carcinoma; three of the five were carriers of a BRCA gene mutation. On the basis of these results, the authors suggest that systematic follow-up examinations with breast MR imaging may benefit women with a reconstructed breast and a high risk for breast cancer recurrence.
PubMed ID
23479706 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Duodecim. 2009;125(13):1407-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Virve Koljonen
Author Affiliation
Töölön sairaala, plastiikkakirurgian klinikka Helsingin palovammakeskus, HUS.
Source
Duodecim. 2009;125(13):1407-13
Date
2009
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amputation
Burns - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Necrosis
Rhabdomyolysis - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Risk factors
Steam Bath - adverse effects
Surgical Flaps
Abstract
Burn injuries caused by hot air sauna burns constitute a Finnish burn rarity. The patients are usually middle-aged men having passed out on the sauna benches under the influence of alcohol. Sauna air causes a deep injury penetrating all layers of the skin, accompanied with necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and consequent rhabdomyolysis. The initially harmless-looking erythema of the skin rapidly transforms into a third-degree burn. Therapy includes the prevention of kidney damage and surgery. Local flaps are recommended for the treatment of tissue defects caused by destruction of deep tissues and amputations.
PubMed ID
19678496 View in PubMed
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Changes in articulatory proficiency following microvascular reconstruction in oral or oropharyngeal cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170638
Source
Oral Oncol. 2006 Jul;42(6):646-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Mari Markkanen-Leppänen
Elina Isotalo
Antti A Mäkitie
Sirpa Asko-Seljavaara
Timo Pessi
Erkki Suominen
Marja-Leena Haapanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Haartmaninkatu 4E, P.O. Box 220, FI-00029 HUS, Helsinki, Finland. mari.markkanen-leppanen@hus.fi
Source
Oral Oncol. 2006 Jul;42(6):646-52
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Articulation Disorders - etiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth Neoplasms - surgery
Oral Surgical Procedures - adverse effects
Oropharyngeal Neoplasms - surgery
Postoperative Complications
Prospective Studies
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - adverse effects
Recovery of Function
Speech Intelligibility
Surgical Flaps - adverse effects
Abstract
Articulatory proficiency of /r/ and /s/ sounds, voice quality and resonance, speech intelligibility, and intraoral sensation were examined prospectively before operation, and at four time points during a 1-year follow-up after microvascular transfer. Forty-one patients with a large oral or oropharyngeal carcinoma undergoing tumor resection and free-flap reconstruction usually combined with radiotherapy participated in the study. Articulation, voice, and resonance were investigated both live and from recorded speech samples by two trained linguistic examiners. The patients completed a self-rating of their speech intelligibility and were assessed for anterior intraoral surface sensation by means of 2-point moving discrimination. Misarticulations of /r/ and /s/ increased significantly after the therapy. Voice quality and resonance remained essentially normal. Speech intelligibility deteriorated significantly. Intraoral sensation decreased postoperatively but was not related to speech outcome. Sensate flaps did not prove to be superior in relation to speech tasks. A multidisciplinary approach is advocated in assessment of speech outcome after cancer surgery. Speech therapy is strongly recommended, even in the absence of a gross articulatory handicap.
PubMed ID
16488177 View in PubMed
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92 records – page 1 of 10.