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A 3-year follow-up study of preformed beta-quartz glass-ceramic insert restorations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195752
Source
Quintessence Int. 2000 Jan;31(1):25-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2000
Author
G. Sjögren
S O Hedlund
C. Jonsson
A. Sandström
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Materials Science, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden. Goran.Sjogren@odont.umu.se
Source
Quintessence Int. 2000 Jan;31(1):25-31
Date
Jan-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bicuspid
Ceramics - chemistry
Color
Dental Caries - classification
Dental Marginal Adaptation
Dental Plaque - classification
Dental Restoration Failure
Dental Restoration, Permanent - classification
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - classification
Glass - chemistry
Humans
Inlays - classification
Male
Middle Aged
Molar
Quartz - chemistry
Surface Properties
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of preformed beta-quartz glass-ceramic insert restorations.
Nine Class I and 30 Class II beta-quartz glass-ceramic insert restorations were placed in 16 patients who were seen regularly by personnel at Umeå University Dental School. The California Dental Association criteria were used to evaluate the restorations at baseline, 6 months, and 1, 2, and 3 years after luting. The occurrence of postoperative sensitivity, the time taken to manufacture each restoration, and certain periodontal conditions were also evaluated.
Sixty-nine percent of the restorations were rated satisfactory at the 3-year examination. During the follow-up period, 4 became loose and 7 were fractured or had flaking surfaces. Caries was registered in connection with 1 restoration. Excellent ratings were obtained for marginal integrity, anatomic form, surface, and color in 62%, 84%, 32%, and 44% of the restorations, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the occurrence of plaque and bleeding on probing in comparison with the controls. The mean overall time for placement was 38 minutes. The estimated survival rate (Kaplan-Meier) was 59% after 3.5 years.
The quality of the beta-quartz glass-ceramic restorations in the present study was inferior to that presented in most earlier studies of ceramic or resin composite posterior restorations placed in patients treated at university clinics. Both the technique and the beta-quartz glass-ceramic inserts have to be evaluated in more long-term studies to assess the possibility of their serving as an alternative restorative technique.
PubMed ID
11203902 View in PubMed
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A 10-year follow-up study of fixed metal ceramic prosthodontics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75777
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 1997 Oct;24(10):713-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
R. Näpänkangas
M A Salonen
A M Raustia
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthetic Dentistry and Stomatognathic Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Oral Rehabil. 1997 Oct;24(10):713-7
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cementation
Ceramics
Crowns
Dental Abutments
Dental Porcelain
Dental Prosthesis Design
Denture Design
Denture, Partial, Fixed
Esthetics, Dental
Evaluation Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - etiology
Gingival Pocket - etiology
Humans
Male
Metal Ceramic Alloys
Middle Aged
Oral Hygiene
Patient satisfaction
Post and Core Technique
Radiography, Dental
Retrospective Studies
Students, Dental
Surface Properties
Zinc Phosphate Cement
Abstract
The aim of this retrospective study was to record patients' satisfaction with fixed metal ceramic bridges and crowns made by dental students and to evaluate the functioning and condition of the bridges and crowns clinically and radiologically. Out of the 60 patients treated at the Institute of Dentistry during 1984-85, 30 patients attended the follow-up examination (16 women, mean age 39, range 23-62 years and 14 men, mean age 44, range 26-65 years). The anamnestic data and data regarding treatment procedures were collected from the patient files. The patients had been supplied with 41 crowns and 24 bridges (mean 3.9 units, range 3-6 units), which included 61 abutments and 33 pontics or cantilever extensions (abutment/pontic ratio 1.85: 1). Marginal fidelity was unsatisfactory in 13% of the crowns and bridges and gingival bleeding and pockets of 4-6 mm were noted in 27% and 12% of cases, respectively. None of the subjects had caries in the abutments.
PubMed ID
9372460 View in PubMed
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A 24-month evaluation of amalgam and resin-based composite restorations: Findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113423
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Jun;144(6):583-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Michael S McCracken
Valeria V Gordan
Mark S Litaker
Ellen Funkhouser
Jeffrey L Fellows
Douglass G Shamp
Vibeke Qvist
Jeffrey S Meral
Gregg H Gilbert
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical and Community Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, USA.
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Jun;144(6):583-93
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Community-Based Participatory Research
Composite Resins - standards
Dental Amalgam - standards
Dental Materials - standards
Dental Prosthesis Repair - statistics & numerical data
Dental Restoration Failure - statistics & numerical data
Dental Restoration, Permanent - classification - standards
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Scandinavia
Sex Factors
Surface Properties
United States
Workload
Young Adult
Abstract
Knowing which factors influence restoration longevity can help clinicians make sound treatment decisions. The authors analyzed data from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network to identify predictors of early failures of amalgam and resin-based composite (RBC) restorations.
In this prospective cohort study, the authors gathered information from clinicians and offices participating in the network. Clinicians completed a baseline data collection form at the time of restoration placement and annually thereafter. Data collected included patient factors, practice factors and dentist factors, and the authors analyzed them by using mixed-model logistic regression.
A total of 226 practitioners followed up 6,218 direct restorations in 3,855 patients; 386 restorations failed (6.2 percent) during the mean (standard deviation) follow-up of 23.7 (8.8) months. The number of tooth surfaces restored at baseline helped predict subsequent restoration failure; restorations with four or more restored surfaces were more than four times more likely to fail. Restorative material was not associated significantly with longevity; neither was tooth type. Older patient age was associated highly with failure (P
Notes
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Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2011 Apr;142(4):429-4021454850
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Cites: Dent Mater. 2012 Jan;28(1):87-10122192253
Cites: Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 2012 May;88(5):797-80122395198
Comment In: J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Nov;144(11):1220, 122224177394
Comment In: J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Nov;144(11):122024177393
PubMed ID
23729455 View in PubMed
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Adhesion properties in systems of laminated pigmented polymers, carbon-graphite fiber composite framework and titanium surfaces in implant suprastructures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95208
Source
Dent Mater. 2009 Sep;25(9):1169-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Segerström Susanna
Ruyter I Eystein
Author Affiliation
NIOM, Nordic Institute of Dental Materials, P.O. Box 70, N-1305 Haslum, Norway. susanna.segerstrom@lul.se
Source
Dent Mater. 2009 Sep;25(9):1169-77
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adhesiveness
Carbon
Composite Resins
Dental Bonding
Dental Cements
Dental Prosthesis Design
Dental Prosthesis, Implant-Supported
Dental Stress Analysis
Denture Bases
Ethylene Glycols
Humans
Polymethacrylic Acids
Polymethyl Methacrylate
Shear Strength
Surface Properties
Titanium
Tooth, Artificial
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: For long-term stability the adhering interfaces of an implant-retained supraconstruction of titanium/carbon-graphite fiber-reinforced (CGFR) polymer/opaquer layer/denture base polymer/denture teeth must function as a unity. The aim was to evaluate adhesion of CGFR polymer to a titanium surface or CGFR polymer to two different opaquer layers/with two denture base polymers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Titanium plates were surface-treated and silanized and combined with a bolt of CGFR polymer or denture base polymer (Probase Hot). Heat-polymerized plates of CGFR polymer (47 wt% fiber) based on poly(methyl methacrylate) and a copolymer matrix were treated with an opaquer (Sinfony or Ropak) before a denture base polymer bolt was attached (Probase Hot or Lucitone 199). All specimens were heat-polymerized, water saturated (200 days) and thermally cycled (5000 cycles, 5/55 degrees C) before shear bond testing. RESULTS: Silicatized titanium surfaces gave higher bond strength to CGFR polymer (16.2+/-2.34 and 18.6+/-1.32) MPa and cohesive fracture than a sandblasted surface (5.9+/-2.11) MPa where the fracture was adhesive. The opaquer Sinfony gave higher adhesion values and mainly cohesive fractures than the opaquer Ropak. Different surface treatments (roughened or polished) of the CGFR polymer had no effect on bond strength. SIGNIFICANCE: The fracture surfaces of silicatized titanium/CGFR polymer/opaquer layer (Sinfony)/denture base polymers were mainly cohesive. A combination of these materials in an implant-retained supraconstruction is promising for in vivo evaluation.
PubMed ID
19541363 View in PubMed
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Airborne fibres in the norwegian silicon carbide industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170564
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2006 Apr;50(3):231-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
A. Skogstad
S. Føreland
E. Bye
W. Eduard
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Hygiene, National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway. asbjorn.skogstad@stami.no
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2006 Apr;50(3):231-40
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - chemistry - classification
Carbon Compounds, Inorganic - chemistry - classification
Chemical Industry
Chemistry, Physical
Humans
Inhalation Exposure
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Mineral Fibers
Norway
Occupational Exposure
Particle Size
Physicochemical Phenomena
Silicon Compounds - chemistry - classification
Surface Properties
Abstract
Morphology of silicon carbide (SiC) fibres from the Norwegian SiC industry has been studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The fibres are an unwanted side-product in SiC production. They represent a probable cause of the observed increased occurrence of lung diseases among SiC workers. The main aim of this work is to give a detailed description of the morphological variation of the fibres. Furthermore, it is important to study the occurrence of various morphological types with respect to job types and process parameters. SiC fibres accounted for >90% of all fibres observed. Eight categories of SiC fibres are described based on their morphology. The most frequent fibre category had a smooth surface and accounted for more than half of the observed SiC fibres. The diameter distributions of the eight fibre types were significantly different except for two of the categories. More than 99% of the SiC fibres observed were
PubMed ID
16497830 View in PubMed
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Analysis and interpretation of a unique Arabic finger ring from the Viking Age town of Birka, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271020
Source
Scanning. 2015 Mar-Apr;37(2):131-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sebastian K T S Wärmländer
Linda Wåhlander
Ragnar Saage
Khodadad Rezakhani
Saied A Hamid Hassan
Michael Neiß
Source
Scanning. 2015 Mar-Apr;37(2):131-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arabs
Archaeology
Female
Humans
Jewelry
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Surface Properties
Sweden
Abstract
In this work we used non-destructive SEM imaging and EDS analysis to characterize the material composition of an Arabic finger ring, which was found in a 9(th) c. woman's grave at the Viking Age (A.D. 793-1066) trading center of Birka, Sweden. The ring is set with a violet stone inscribed with Arabic Kufic writing, here interpreted as reading "il-la-lah", i.e. "For/to Allah". The stone was previously thought to be an amethyst, but the current results show it to be coloured glass. The ring has been cast in a high-grade silver alloy (94.5/5.5 Ag/Cu) and retains the post-casting marks from the filing done to remove flash and mold lines. Thus, the ring has rarely been worn, and likely passed from the silversmith to the woman buried at Birka with few owners in between. The ring may therefore constitute material evidence for direct interactions between Viking Age Scandinavia and the Islamic world. Being the only ring with an Arabic inscription found at a Scandinavian archaeological site, it is a unique object among Swedish Viking Age material. The technical analysis presented here provides a better understanding of the properties and background of this intriguing piece of jewelry.
PubMed ID
25707897 View in PubMed
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An antigen related to the phenotype of multi-drug resistance can be induced in vivo and used as a target for immunotherapy of rat leukemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26677
Source
Leuk Res. 1985;9(8):987-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
A. Brox
G. Price
A K Sullivan
Source
Leuk Res. 1985;9(8):987-92
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Monoclonal
Antigens, Neoplasm - biosynthesis
Cytotoxicity, Immunologic
Daunorubicin - therapeutic use
Disease Models, Animal
Drug resistance
Female
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Immunization
Immunotherapy
Leukemia, Experimental - therapy
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Microscopy, Fluorescence
Rats
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Surface Properties
Time Factors
Abstract
Several laboratories have reported that new plasma membrane peptides appear in rodent and human cells after induction of in-vitro resistance to vinca alkaloids, anthracyclines and other anti-neoplastic drugs. Recently, murine monoclonal antibodies have been produced that recognize surface components of such drug-resistant cells. The work presented here describes the development of an in-vivo animal model of this phenomenon using a rat myeloid leukemia. Brown Norway rats were made leukemic with promyelocytes of the BNML line and subsequently were treated with 7.7 mg kg-1 of daunorubicin. After eight cycles of passage-treatment-regrowth, the resulting cells reacted with this antibody in immunofluorescence and cytotoxicity assays. Animals injected with cells that had been pre-incubated with antibody in the absence of complement survived significantly longer than did the controls. Further prolongation of survival occurred when the cells were treated with a second antibody of a different specificity. These results demonstrate that some of the changes associated with in-vitro drug resistance occur also in vivo and potentially may be exploited as a focus for immunotherapy.
PubMed ID
3900592 View in PubMed
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Anatoxin-a producing Tychonema (Cyanobacteria) in European waterbodies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266912
Source
Water Res. 2015 Feb 1;69:68-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2015
Author
S. Shams
C. Capelli
L. Cerasino
A. Ballot
D R Dietrich
K. Sivonen
N. Salmaso
Source
Water Res. 2015 Feb 1;69:68-79
Date
Feb-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromatography, Liquid
Cyanobacteria - isolation & purification - metabolism
Environment
Italy
Lakes - microbiology
Mass Spectrometry
Norway
Phylogeny
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Surface Properties
Tropanes - metabolism
Abstract
In order to identify the cyanobacterial species responsible of anatoxin-a (ATX) production in Lake Garda (Northern Italy), an intensive isolation and culturing of filamentous cyanobacteria were established since 2014 from environmental samples. In this work, we report a detailed account of the strategy adopted, which led to the discovery of a new unexpected producer of ATX, Tychonema bourrellyi. So far, this species is the first documented example of cultured Oscillatoriales able to produce ATX isolated from pelagic freshwater ecosystems. The isolated filaments were identified adopting a polyphasic approach, which included microscopic species identification, genetic characterisation and phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA genes. The taxonomic identification was further confirmed by the high (>99%) rbcLX sequence similarities of the T. bourrellyi strains of Lake Garda with those deposited in DNA sequence databases. More than half of the isolates were shown to produce a significant amount of ATX, with cell quota ranging between 0.1 and 2.6 µg mm(-3), and 0.01 and 0.35 pg cell(-1). The toxic isolates were tested positive for anaC of the anatoxin-a synthetase (ana) gene cluster. These findings were confirmed with the discovery of one ATX producing T. bourrellyi strain isolated in Norway. This strain and a further non-ATX producing Norwegian Tychonema bornetii strain tested positive for the presence of the anaF gene of the ana gene cluster. Conversely, none of the Italian and Norwegian Tychonema strains were positive for microcystins (MCs), which was also confirmed by the absence of mcyE PCR products in all the samples analysed. This work suggests that the only reliable strategy to identify cyanotoxins producers should be based on the isolation of strains and their identification with a polyphasic approach associated to a concurrent metabolomic profiling.
PubMed ID
25437339 View in PubMed
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Approximal caries prevalence in Danish recruits and progression of caries in the late teens: a retrospective radiographic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74987
Source
Caries Res. 2001 Jan-Feb;35(1):27-35
Publication Type
Article
Author
H. Hintze
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Radiology, Royal Dental College, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Aarhus, Denmark. hhintze@odont.aau.dk
Source
Caries Res. 2001 Jan-Feb;35(1):27-35
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Confidence Intervals
Denmark - epidemiology
Dental Caries - epidemiology - radiography
Disease Progression
Humans
Incidence
Male
Military Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Observer Variation
Prevalence
Radiography, Bitewing - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Surface Properties
Abstract
This study aimed to assess radiographically the prevalence and distribution of approximal caries in Danish recruits and to estimate the rate of caries progression during the recruits' late teens. To assess caries progression radiographs taken previously (when leaving the Public Dental Health Care Service, usually at the age of 16-18) were requested. Of 676 recruits previous radiographs (taken 1-7 years earlier) were procured for 640. Approximal surfaces from 7d to 4m in the maxilla and the mandible were assessed for the absence or presence/depth of caries and restorations. Caries progression was expressed by the incidence rate indicating the number of new lesions/number of lesions with progression per 100 years. In the maxilla the average prevalence of enamel and dentine caries was 8.3 and 6.2%, respectively. Overall, 6m had the highest caries experience. In the mandible the average prevalence of enamel and dentine caries was 10.7 and 5.8%, respectively. The highest caries experience was found in 6d. Twenty percent of the recruits had no caries experience in the surfaces under study, 9% had caries experience in 1 surface, 13% in 4-5 surfaces and 25% in more than 10 surfaces. For all surfaces combined, the median incidence rate for the transition from sound to enamel caries was 2.4 surfaces per 100 years, ranging from 0.4 in mandibular 7d to 5.5 in mandibular 6d. The median rate for progression from the enamel to the outer half of the dentine was 9.2 surfaces per 100 years, ranging from 4.4 in mandibular 5m to 18.9 in mandibular 6d. The median incidence rate for progression from the outer to the inner half of the dentine was 2.3 surfaces per 100 years. However, this figure was based on a small number of events and should therefore be interpreted with caution. In conclusion, enamel and dentine caries was found in 9 and 6% of the approximal surfaces in newly called up recruits, and one quarter of the recruits had caries experience in more than 10 approximal surfaces. Generally, the development of new approximal lesions and the progression of enamel caries was a slow process during the late teens.
PubMed ID
11125193 View in PubMed
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Are automobile head restraints used effectively?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220818
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1993 Jul;39:1584-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1993
Author
S. Lubin
J. Sehmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1993 Jul;39:1584-8
Date
Jul-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Automobile Driving
Automobiles - classification
British Columbia - epidemiology
Equipment Design
Female
Head Protective Devices - classification - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Sex Factors
Surface Properties
Abstract
Observation of 992 motor vehicles and their drivers revealed that most drivers do not have their head restraints effectively positioned. Improper positioning was more common with adjustable restraints, in commercial vehicles, and among male drivers. Some head restraints could not be adjusted properly. Improvements in headrest adjustment might help decrease morbidity in motor vehicle accidents.
Notes
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Cites: Med Biol Eng. 1976 May;14(3):263-73940385
Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 1994 Mar;40:429-308199491
PubMed ID
8053992 View in PubMed
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91 records – page 1 of 10.