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The acute effects of inhaled salbutamol on the beat-to-beat variability of heart rate and blood pressure assessed by spectral analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208850
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 1997 Apr;43(4):421-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
T. Jartti
T. Kaila
K. Tahvanainen
T. Kuusela
T. Vanto
I. Välimäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Turku University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 1997 Apr;43(4):421-8
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Albuterol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Baroreflex - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Bronchospirometry
Child
Cross-Over Studies
Double-Blind Method
Electrocardiography - drug effects
Female
Finland
Forced Expiratory Flow Rates - drug effects
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Male
Respiratory Function Tests
Supine Position
Abstract
We wanted to study the effects of a 600 micrograms inhaled salbutamol dose on the cardiovascular and respiratory autonomic nervous regulation in eight children suffering from bronchial asthma.
In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study we continuously measured electrocardiogram, finger systolic arterial pressure (SAP) and flow-volume spirometry at baseline as well as 20 min and 2 h after the drug inhalation. The R-R interval (the time between successive heart beats) and SAP variabilities were assessed by using spectral analysis. Baroreflex sensitivity was assessed by using cross-spectral analysis.
Salbutamol significantly decreased the total and low frequency (LF) variability of R-R intervals as well as the high frequency (HF) variability of R-R intervals and of SAP. Salbutamol significantly increased the LF/HF ratio of R-R intervals and of SAP, minute ventilation, heart rate and forced pulmonary function in comparison with placebo. The weight of the subjects significantly correlated positively with baroreflex sensitivity and negatively with heart rate after the salbutamol inhalation.
We conclude that the acute salbutamol inhalation decreases cardiovagal nervous responsiveness, increases sympathetic dominance in the cardiovascular autonomic balance, and has a tendency to decrease baroreflex sensitivity in addition to improved pulmonary function.
PubMed ID
9146855 View in PubMed
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Agreement in the interpretation of magnetic resonance images of the lumbar spine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151073
Source
Acta Radiol. 2009 Jun;50(5):497-506
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
F M Kovacs
A. Royuela
T S Jensen
A. Estremera
G. Amengual
A. Muriel
I. Galarraga
C. Martínez
E. Arana
H. Sarasíbar
R M Salgado
V. Abraira
O. López
C. Campillo
M T Gil del Real
J. Zamora
Author Affiliation
Departamento Científico, Fundación Kovacs, Palma de Majorca, Spain. kovacs@kovacs.org
Source
Acta Radiol. 2009 Jun;50(5):497-506
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Female
Humans
Lumbar Vertebrae - pathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods - statistics & numerical data
Male
Observer Variation
Reproducibility of Results
Severity of Illness Index
Spain
Spinal Diseases - diagnosis
Supine Position
Abstract
Correlation between clinical features and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings is essential in low-back-pain patients. Most previous studies have analyzed concordance in the interpretation of lumbar MRI among a few radiologists who worked together. This may have overestimated concordance.
To evaluate intra- and interobserver agreement in the interpretation of lumbar MRI performed in an open 0.2 T system.
Seven radiologists from two different geographic settings in Spain interpreted the lumbar MRIs of 50 subjects representative of the general Danish population aged 40 years. The radiologists interpreted the images in routine clinical practice, having no knowledge of the clinical and demographic characteristics of the subjects and blinded to their colleagues' assessments. Six of the radiologists evaluated the same MRIs 14 days later, having no knowledge of the previous results. Data on the existence of disc degeneration, high-intensity zones, disc contour, Schmorl nodes, Modic changes, osteophytes, spondylolisthesis, and spinal stenosis were collected in the Nordic Modic Consensus Group Classification form. Intra- and interobserver agreement was analyzed for variables with a prevalence >or=10% and
PubMed ID
19431057 View in PubMed
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Anatomical shape of the airways in two different European populations. A radio-anatomical study of the airways.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214831
Source
Acta Radiol. 1995 Jul;36(4):448-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
P A Dimopoulos
S D Yarmenitis
G. Nikiforidis
C G Alexopoulos
Author Affiliation
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Patras, Greece.
Source
Acta Radiol. 1995 Jul;36(4):448-52
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Equipment Design
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Greece
Humans
Intubation, Intratracheal - instrumentation
Male
Middle Aged
Neck - radiography
Respiratory System - anatomy & histology - radiography
Sex Characteristics
Supine Position
Sweden
Abstract
Lateral radiographs of the airways were taken in 20 men and 24 women lying supine with the neck in the normal position. The mean configuration of the airways for men and women is presented in a standard coordinate system. The results (contours of the airways) are compared to those of a Swedish study since the same method was applied in order to find out, if the established model is valid for other populations. Significant differences were found between the two population groups as well as between males and females. This indicates both inter-racial and inter-sexual modification of the anatomical shape of the airways.
PubMed ID
7619628 View in PubMed
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Assessment of cerebral autoregulation: the quandary of quantification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122399
Source
Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2012 Sep 15;303(6):H658-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2012
Author
Y C Tzeng
P N Ainslie
W H Cooke
K C Peebles
C K Willie
B A MacRae
J D Smirl
H M Horsman
C A Rickards
Author Affiliation
Cardiovascular Systems Laboratory, University of Otago, Wellington South, New Zealand. shieak.tzeng@otago.ac.nz
Source
Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2012 Sep 15;303(6):H658-71
Date
Sep-15-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Flow Velocity
Blood pressure
British Columbia
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Exercise
Female
Fourier Analysis
Heart rate
Homeostasis
Humans
Hypercapnia - physiopathology
Hypocapnia - physiopathology
Linear Models
Male
Middle Cerebral Artery - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Models, Cardiovascular
New Zealand
Observer Variation
Prospective Studies
Regional Blood Flow
Reproducibility of Results
Respiration
Retrospective Studies
Supine Position
Texas
Tourniquets
Ultrasonography, Doppler, Pulsed
Ultrasonography, Doppler, Transcranial
Young Adult
Abstract
We assessed the convergent validity of commonly applied metrics of cerebral autoregulation (CA) to determine the extent to which the metrics can be used interchangeably. To examine between-subject relationships among low-frequency (LF; 0.07-0.2 Hz) and very-low-frequency (VLF; 0.02-0.07 Hz) transfer function coherence, phase, gain, and normalized gain, we performed retrospective transfer function analysis on spontaneous blood pressure and middle cerebral artery blood velocity recordings from 105 individuals. We characterized the relationships (n = 29) among spontaneous transfer function metrics and the rate of regulation index and autoregulatory index derived from bilateral thigh-cuff deflation tests. In addition, we analyzed data from subjects (n = 29) who underwent a repeated squat-to-stand protocol to determine the relationships between transfer function metrics during forced blood pressure fluctuations. Finally, data from subjects (n = 16) who underwent step changes in end-tidal P(CO2) (P(ET)(CO2) were analyzed to determine whether transfer function metrics could reliably track the modulation of CA within individuals. CA metrics were generally unrelated or showed only weak to moderate correlations. Changes in P(ET)(CO2) were positively related to coherence [LF: ß = 0.0065 arbitrary units (AU)/mmHg and VLF: ß = 0.011 AU/mmHg, both P
PubMed ID
22821992 View in PubMed
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Association between admission supine systolic blood pressure and 1-year mortality in patients admitted to the intensive care unit for acute chest pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97600
Source
JAMA. 2010 Mar 24;303(12):1167-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-24-2010
Author
Ulf Stenestrand
Magnus Wijkman
Mats Fredrikson
Fredrik H Nystrom
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, SE-581 85, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
JAMA. 2010 Mar 24;303(12):1167-72
Date
Mar-24-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood pressure
Chest Pain
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - complications - mortality
Intensive Care Units
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Myocardial Ischemia - mortality
Patient Admission
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Supine Position
Sweden - epidemiology
Systole
Abstract
CONTEXT: High resting blood pressure (BP) is among the best studied and established risk factors for cardiovascular disease. However, little is known about the relationship between BP under acute stress, such as in acute chest pain, and subsequent mortality. OBJECTIVE: To study long-term mortality related to supine BP in patients admitted to the medical intensive care unit (ICU) for acute chest pain. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Data from the RIKS-HIA (Registry of Information and Knowledge About Swedish Heart Intensive Care Admissions) was used to analyze the mortality in relation to supine admission systolic BP in 119,151 participants who were treated at the ICU for the symptom of chest pain from 1997 through 2007. Results from this prospective cohort study were presented according to systolic BP quartiles: Q1, less than 128 mm Hg; Q2, from 128 to 144 mm Hg; Q3, from 145 to 162 mm Hg; and Q4, at or above 163 mm Hg. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Total mortality. RESULTS: Mean (SD) follow-up time was 2.47 (1.5) years (range, 1-10 years). One-year mortality rate by Cox proportional hazard model (adjusted for age, sex, smoking, diastolic BP, use of antihypertensive medication at admission and discharge, and use of lipid-lowering and antiplatelet medication at discharge) showed that participants in Q4 had the best prognosis (hazard ratio [HR], 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72-0.80, Q4 compared with Q2; corresponding risks for Q1 were HR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.39-1.52, and for Q3, HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.79-0.87). Patients in Q4 had a 21.7% lower absolute risk compared with Q2, patients in Q3 had a 15.2% lower risk than in Q2, and patients in Q1 had a 40.3% higher risk for mortality than in Q2. The worse prognosis in Q2 compared with Q4 was independent of body mass index and previous diagnoses and similar when analysis was restricted to patients with a final diagnosis of angina or myocardial infarction (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.71-0.80, Q4 compared with Q2). CONCLUSION: Among patients admitted to the ICU for chest pain, there is an inverse association between admission supine systolic BP and 1-year mortality rate.
Notes
RefSource: JAMA. 2010 Jul 7;304(1):40; author reply 40-1
PubMed ID
20332402 View in PubMed
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Association between sudden infant death syndrome and prone sleep position, bed sharing, and sleeping outside an infant crib in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4513
Source
Pediatrics. 2001 Oct;108(4):923-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
B D Gessner
G C Ives
K A Perham-Hester
Author Affiliation
Alaska Division of Public Health, Anchorage, Alaska, USA. brad_gessner@health.state.ak.us
Source
Pediatrics. 2001 Oct;108(4):923-7
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Beds - utilization
Cause of Death
Child of Impaired Parents - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Behavior - physiology
Infant Care - methods
Infant Equipment - utilization
Infant mortality
Maternal Age
Parents - psychology
Prone Position - physiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sleep - physiology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sudden Infant Death - epidemiology
Supine Position - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the contribution of prone sleeping, bed sharing, and sleeping outside an infant crib to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). METHODS: We conducted a retrospective descriptive study of all SIDS cases in Alaska from January 1, 1992, through December 31, 1997. Reviewed data sources included maternal and infant medical records, autopsy reports, birth and death certificates, police and state trooper death scene investigations, and occasionally home interviews. RESULTS: The death certificate identified SIDS as a cause of death for 130 infants (cause-specific infant mortality rate: 2.0 per 1000 live births). Among infants for whom this information was known, 113 (98%) of 115 were found in the prone position, sleeping outside an infant crib, or sleeping with another person. By contrast, 2 (1.7%) were found alone and supine in their crib (1 of whom was found with a blanket wrapped around his face). Of 40 infants who slept with a parent at the time of death, only 1 infant who slept supine with a non-drug-using parent on an adult nonwater mattress was identified. CONCLUSION: Almost all SIDS deaths in Alaska occurred in association with prone sleeping, bed sharing, or sleeping outside a crib. In the absence of other risk factors, SIDS deaths associated with parental bed sharing were rare.
PubMed ID
11581445 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure responses in Japanese and Swedish children in the supine and standing position.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35702
Source
Eur Heart J. 1994 Aug;15(8):1011-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
H. Tanaka
O. Thulesius
M. Borres
H. Yamaguchi
M. Mino
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1994 Aug;15(8):1011-9
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Autonomic Nervous System - physiopathology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure Monitors
Child
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Ethnic Groups
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Hypertension - physiopathology
Hypotension, Orthostatic - physiopathology
Japan
Male
Posture - physiology
Pressoreceptors - physiopathology
Reference Values
Risk factors
Supine Position - physiology
Sweden
Abstract
We investigated the cardiovascular responses to active standing in Swedish and Japanese pre-pubertal children using non-invasive continuous beat-to-beat finger blood pressure (BP) monitoring. Seventy-eight Swedish (7-12 years) and 53 Japanese children (6-12 years) were examined. There were no significant differences in body weight or height between the two groups (total group). Finger blood pressure and heart rate were continuously recorded in the supine position and during standing. Supine BP was significantly higher in Swedish compared to Japanese children (115/65 vs 98/50 mmHg, P
PubMed ID
7988591 View in PubMed
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Circulating nitric oxide products do not solely reflect nitric oxide release in cirrhosis and portal hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133052
Source
Liver Int. 2011 Oct;31(9):1381-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Pia Afzelius
Nassim Bazeghi
Peter Bie
Flemming Bendtsen
Jørgen Vestbo
Søren Møller
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Hvidovre Hospital, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Liver Int. 2011 Oct;31(9):1381-7
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Breath Tests
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Female
Heart rate
Hemodynamics
Humans
Hypertension, Portal - blood - etiology - physiopathology
Liver Cirrhosis - blood - complications - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Nitrates - blood
Nitric Oxide - metabolism
Nitrites - blood
Portal Pressure
Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity
Renin-Angiotensin System
Respiratory Function Tests
Splanchnic Circulation
Supine Position
Vasodilation
Abstract
Patients with cirrhosis often develop a systemic vasodilatation and a hyperdynamic circulation with activation of vasoconstrictor systems such as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), and vasopressin. Increased nitric oxide (NO) synthesis has been implicated in the development of this state of vasodilation and pulmonary dysfunction including increased exhaled NO concentrations. Circulating metabolites (NO(x)) may affect the systemic and pulmonary NO-generation. However, the relations of these abnormalities to the haemodynamic changes remain unclear.
The aims of the present study were to measure changes in exhaled NO in relation to circulating NO(x), RAAS, and haemodynamics.
Twenty patients (eight child class A and 12 class B patients) underwent a liver vein catheterization with determination of splanchnic and systemic haemodynamics. Circulating NO(x) and exhaled NO were determined in the supine and sitting positions and related to haemodynamics, RAAS and lung diffusing capacity (D(L)CO). Eight matched healthy individuals served as controls.
All patients with cirrhosis had portal hypertension. We found no significant difference in exhaled NO between patients and controls and no changes from the supine to the sitting position. Exhaled NO in the patients correlated significantly with plasma volume, heart rate and D(L)CO. NO(x) concentrations were not significantly increased in the patients. NO(x) correlated with portal pressure and haemodynamic indicators of vasodilatation, but not with exhaled NO concentrations.
In patients with moderate cirrhosis, exhaled NO is normal. Circulating NO(x) do not seem to reflect pulmonary and systemic NO release, but NO(x) seems to reflect systemic and splanchnic haemodynamic changes in cirrhosis.
PubMed ID
21745317 View in PubMed
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A cost-outcome analysis of Image-Guided Patient Repositioning in the radiation treatment of cancer of the prostate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151224
Source
Radiother Oncol. 2009 Oct;93(1):25-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Nicolas Ploquin
Peter Dunscombe
Author Affiliation
Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Department of Medical Physics, Alta., Canada. nploquin@ottawahospital.on.ca
Source
Radiother Oncol. 2009 Oct;93(1):25-31
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost Savings
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Costs and Cost Analysis - methods
Health Care Costs
Humans
Male
Models, Economic
Ontario
Patient Positioning - methods
Prone Position
Prostatic Neoplasms - economics - radiography - radiotherapy
Radiation Oncology - economics - methods
Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted - methods
Radiotherapy Planning, Computer-Assisted - economics - methods
Radiotherapy, Conformal - economics - methods
Supine Position
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
With Image-Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) rapidly gaining acceptance in the clinic it is timely to commence an assessment of its potential outcome benefit versus costs.
Using Activity-Based Costing we have calculated the incremental cost of adding Image-Guided Patient Repositioning (IGPR), a significant component of IGRT, to both Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy (3DCRT) for prostate cancer. The dosimetric outcome benefit resulting from the implementation of IGPR is estimated from a publication describing the improvement in set-up accuracy using each of four correction protocols. In our study outcome is quantified using a metric based on the Equivalent Uniform Dose. Our discussion is limited to image-guided corrective translations of the patient and does not specifically address margin reduction, rotations, organ deformation or major equipment failure modes, all of which are significant additional justifications for implementing an IGRT program.
Image guidance used solely for translational patient repositioning for prostate cancer adds costs with relatively little improvement in dosimetric quality. Full exploitation of the potential of IGRT, particularly through margin reduction, can be expected to result in a reduction in the cost-outcome ratios reported here.
IMRT benefits more than 3DCRT from IGPR with the Weekly Shrinking Action Level approach yielding the lowest cost-outcome ratio.
PubMed ID
19409635 View in PubMed
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Doppler ultrasound examination of multiple sclerosis patients and control participants: inter-observer agreement and association with disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108213
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2013 Oct;46(4):466-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
S J Laukontaus
T. Kagayama
M. Lepäntalo
S. Atula
M. Färkkilä
A. Albäck
Y. Inoue
P. Tienari
M. Venermo
Author Affiliation
Department of Vascular Surgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: sani.laukontaus@hus.fi.
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2013 Oct;46(4):466-72
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Chi-Square Distribution
Chronic Disease
Feasibility Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Jugular Veins - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Observer Variation
Patient Positioning
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Regional Blood Flow
Reproducibility of Results
Spine - blood supply
Supine Position
Ultrasonography, Doppler
Veins - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Venous Insufficiency - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Young Adult
Abstract
Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) has been proposed as a major risk factor for multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to assess inter-observer agreement between two ultrasound examiners and to compare findings in MS patients and control participants.
A prospective, blinded, controlled study of MS patients diagnosed within 2 years (MS = 2, n = 39), patients diagnosed more than 10 years ago (MS > 10, n = 43) and age- and sex-matched control participants (n = 40). Ultrasound examinations were performed by two independent examiners. CCSVI criteria 1, 3, 4 and 5 as proposed by Zamboni were explored: (1) reflux in the internal jugular (IJV) and vertebral veins (VV), (3) IJV cross-sectional area (CSA) =0.3 cm(2), (4) absence of flow in IJV and VV, and (5) reverted postural control of venous outflow.
Criteria 1, 4 and 5 were met in less than 10% of the MS patients and control participants as studied by both examiners. The level of inter-observer agreement was poor for all parameters except assessment of the CSA of IJV at the thyroid level. Findings meeting CCSVI criterion 3 (CSA = 0.3 cm(2)) were observed in 18/40 (45%) of the control participants, in 24/37 (65%) of MS = 2 patients (p = 0.09 vs. control participants) and in 30/43 (70%) of the MS > 10 patients (p = 0.022 vs. control participants).
The feasibility of the CCSVI criteria for common use is questionable because of low inter-observer agreement. Small-calibre IJVs meeting the CCSVI criterion 3 appear common in both Finnish control participants and MS patients, but the clinical significance of this finding is questionable.
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2013 Dec;46(6):734-524080426
Comment In: Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2013 Dec;46(6):73424094942
Comment In: Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2013 Dec;46(6):73524094941
PubMed ID
23920002 View in PubMed
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51 records – page 1 of 6.