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A 3-year follow-up of sun behavior in patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106960
Source
JAMA Dermatol. 2014 Feb;150(2):163-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Luise Winkel Idorn
Pameli Datta
Jakob Heydenreich
Peter Alshede Philipsen
Hans Christian Wulf
Author Affiliation
Dermatological Research Department D92, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
JAMA Dermatol. 2014 Feb;150(2):163-8
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Melanoma - etiology - pathology
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - etiology - pathology
Sunlight - adverse effects
Time Factors
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
Abstract
IMPORTANCE UV radiation (UVR) exposure is the primary environmental risk factor for developing cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). OBJECTIVE To measure changes in sun behavior from the first until the third summer after the diagnosis of CMM using matched controls as a reference. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Three-year follow-up, observational, case-control study performed from May 7 to September 22, 2009, April 17 to September 15, 2010, and May 6 to July 31, 2011, at a university hospital in Denmark of 21 patients with CMM and 21 controls matched to patients by sex, age, occupation, and constitutive skin type participated in the study. Exposure to UVR was assessed the first and second summers (n=20) and the first and third summers (n=22) after diagnosis. Data from 40 participants were analyzed. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Exposure to UVR was assessed by personal electronic UVR dosimeters that measured time-related UVR in standard erythema dose (SED) and corresponding sun diaries (mean, 74 days per participant each participation year). RESULTS Patients' daily UVR dose and UVR dose in connection with various behaviors increased during follow-up (quantified as an increase in daily UVR dose each year; all days: mean, 0.3 SED; 95% CI, 0.05-0.5 SED; days with body exposure: mean, 0.6 SED; 95% CI, 0.07-1.2 SED; holidays: mean, 1.2 SED; 95% CI, 0.3-2.1 SED; days abroad: 1.9 SED; 95% CI, 0.4-3.4 SED; and holidays with body exposure: mean, 2.3 SED; 95% CI, 1.1-3.4 SED). After the second year of follow-up, patients' UVR dose was higher than that of controls, who maintained a stable UVR dose. No difference was found between groups in the number of days with body exposure or the number of days using sunscreen in the second and third years of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our findings suggest that patients with CMM do not maintain a cautious sun behavior in connection with an increase in UVR exposure, especially on days with body exposure, when abroad, and on holidays.
PubMed ID
24080851 View in PubMed
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5 years' experience of 5-S-cysteinyldopa in melanoma diagnosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27508
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 1979;59(5):381-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
G. Agrup
P. Agrup
T. Andersson
L. Hafström
C. Hansson
S. Jacobsson
P E Jönsson
H. Rorsman
A M Rosengren
E. Rosengren
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 1979;59(5):381-8
Date
1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cysteinyldopa - metabolism - urine
Dihydroxyphenylalanine - analogs & derivatives
Female
Hair Color
Humans
Lymphatic Metastasis
Male
Melanoma - diagnosis - urine
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Metastasis
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - diagnosis - urine
Sunlight
Abstract
Determinations of the urinary excretion of 5-S-cysteinyldopa were performed in 571 patients previously treated by surgery for melanoma or melanoma metastasis. 90% of the 161 patients with metastases showed values exceeding 0.15 mg/24 h, and 9% of the 410 patients without metastases had such values. The increase in 5-S-cysteinyldopa excretion was generally more pronounced in men with metastases than in women, 98% of the men and 77% of the women with metastases showing values exceeding 0.15 mg/24 h. High levels of 5-S-cysteinyldopa are of grave prognostic significan4% died within one month, and only 3% survived for more than a year. In Sweden, determination of 5-S-cysteinyldopa in patients operated on for melanoma gives maximum information in the winter (October--March), when sun exposure does not influence the excretion levels.
PubMed ID
93360 View in PubMed
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25-hydroxyvitamin D accumulation during summer in elderly women at latitude 60 degrees N.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149948
Source
J Intern Med. 2009 Nov;266(5):476-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Ann Burgaz
A. Akesson
K. Michaëlsson
A. Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. ann.burgaz@ki.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2009 Nov;266(5):476-83
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Seasons
Sunlight
Sweden
Ultraviolet Rays
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
During half of the year, cutaneous synthesis of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) is not detectable at northern latitudes, leaving the population dependent on other sources for optimal vitamin D status. During April to September, 25(OH)D status may be improved by solar exposure. In this study, we measured seasonal differences in serum 25(OH)D concentrations and identified the major predictors of summer 25(OH)D concentrations.
We assessed serum 25(OH)D concentrations during both winter and summer amongst 100 women, aged 61-83 years, randomly sampled from the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Participants completed two detailed questionnaires covering diet, use of dietary supplements and sun-related behaviour, the first in January through March and a second time in August through September.
The mean seasonal increase in serum 25(OH)D concentrations was 38% from mean 72 +/- 23 nmol L(-1) during winter to 99 +/- 29 nmol L(-1) in summer. High summer 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with higher winter concentrations, preference of staying in sun instead of shade, having a nonsensitive skin type and normal body mass index. Based on multiple linear regression modelling, preferring sun, having nonsensitive skin type and normal weight as compared with preferring shade, having sensitive skin type and being obese, was associated with a 64 nmol L(-1) higher 25(OH)D concentrations during summer.
Women with high winter 25(OH)D serum concentrations, with preference of staying in the sun instead of shade during summer, a skin type allowing for longer sun exposure and a normal weight had the highest summer 25(OH)D concentrations.
PubMed ID
19570054 View in PubMed
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25-Hydroxyvitamin D in Canadian adults: biological, environmental, and behavioral correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141385
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 May;22(5):1389-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
L S Greene-Finestone
C. Berger
M. de Groh
D A Hanley
N. Hidiroglou
K. Sarafin
S. Poliquin
J. Krieger
J B Richards
D. Goltzman
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. linda.greene-finestone@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 May;22(5):1389-99
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Seasons
Sex Distribution
Skin Pigmentation - physiology
Sunlight
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
We assessed vitamin D status and its correlates in the population-based Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos). Results showed that serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels
PubMed ID
20730415 View in PubMed
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25-Hydroxyvitamin D levels during breast-feeding with or without maternal or infantile supplementation of vitamin D.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238975
Source
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1985 Apr;4(2):220-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1985
Author
M. Ala-Houhala
Source
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1985 Apr;4(2):220-6
Date
Apr-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Breast Feeding
Calcium - blood
Female
Finland
Humans
Hydroxycholecalciferols - blood
Infant
Magnesium - blood
Phosphorus - blood
Pilot Projects
Rickets - prevention & control
Risk
Seasons
Sunlight
Vitamin D - therapeutic use
Abstract
Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD), calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and alkaline phosphatase levels of breast-fed infants and their mothers were studied by following 100 healthy term mother-infant pairs with different supplementation protocols of vitamin D. A pilot study in winter revealed that six of eight breast-fed infants without vitamin D supplementation had serum 25-OHD levels below the risk limit for rickets (5 ng/ml) at the age of 8 weeks. In the main study in winter groups, it was found that the 25-OHD levels were low (5.6 +/- 3.7 ng/ml) at the age of 8 weeks in the unsupplemented breast-fed infants, whose mothers were given vitamin D supplementation of 1,000 IU/day during lactation (group I), compared with the levels of those infants receiving either 400 (18.0 +/- 8.4 ng/ml, group II) or 1,000 IU (22.8 +/- 11.2 ng/ml, group III) vitamin D (group I vs. group II or III, p less than 0.001; group II vs. group III, NS). In group I 10 of 18 infants had serum 25-OHD levels less than 5 ng/ml compared with none of the infants in groups II and III. Yet the infants with 25-OHD levels less than 5 ng/ml showed no signs of clinical or biochemical rickets at the age of 8 or 20 weeks. In summer at delivery the maternal 25-OHD levels were good, but decreased thereafter. Also in summer groups, the infantile 25-OHD concentrations decreased; however, because the levels at delivery were high, they stayed in the normal range.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
3989622 View in PubMed
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25(OH)D levels in trained versus sedentary university students at 64° north.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290407
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
2017
Author
Scott P Jerome
Kendra D Sticka
Theresia M Schnurr
Sally J Mangum
Arleigh J Reynolds
Kriya L Dunlap
Author Affiliation
a Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry , University of Alaska Fairbanks , Fairbanks , AK , USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Body Weights and Measures
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Sedentary lifestyle
Students
Sunlight
Universities
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency is associated with compromised bone mineralisation, fatigue, suppressed immune function and unsatisfactory skeletal muscle recovery. We investigated the risk of 25(OH)D insufficiency or deficiency in endurance athletes compared to sedentary non-athletes living at 64° north.
University student-athletes (TS) and sedentary students (SS) volunteered to participate in this study. TS engaged in regular exercise while SS exercised no more than 20 minutes/week. Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET) scores for participants were determined. Vitamin D intake was assessed using the National Cancer Institute's 24-hour food recall (ASA24). Fasting plasma 25(OH)D levels were quantified via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
TS reported higher activity levels than SS as assessed with MET-minutes/week and ranking of physical activity levels (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
28452288 View in PubMed
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A 60-year follow-up of the incidence and prevalence of multiple sclerosis in Hordaland County, Western Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272084
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2016 Jan;87(1):100-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
N. Grytten
J H Aarseth
H M B Lunde
K M Myhr
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2016 Jan;87(1):100-5
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Age of Onset
Aged
Child
Delayed Diagnosis - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Multiple Sclerosis, Chronic Progressive - epidemiology
Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Sunlight
Vitamin D - metabolism
Young Adult
Abstract
Investigate the incidence of multiple sclerosis during 1953-2013 and estimate the prevalence rate of MS on 1 January 2003 and 2013 in Hordaland County, Western Norway.
All patients with onset of disease in Hordaland 1953-2013 were identified in files from previous studies until 2003 and from patient records at the departments of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital and Haugesund Hospital during 2003-2013. 1558 patients were assessed and 1402 of these were included, of whom 1035 were alive and living in Hordaland at prevalence day 1 January 2013. Annual incidence rates were calculated for 1953-2013.
On 1 January 2003, the crude prevalence rate was 191/100 000 population and on 1 January 2013, the crude prevalence rate was 211.4 (95% CI 198.3 to 224.2) per 100 000; 270.9 (95% CI 250.6 to 292.3) for women and 151.8 (95% CI 136.8 to 167.9) for men. Prevalence peaked at ages 55-59 years for women and 60-64 years for men. The annual incidence rate increased from 1.9 (95% CI 1.2 to 2.6) per 100 000 during 1953-1957 to 7.2 (95% CI 6.0 to 8.5) during 1978-1982 and to 8.5 (95% CI 7.3 to 9.7) during 2003-2007, thus indicating a stabilising incidence over the past 35 years. The female/male ratio ranged from 1.2:1 to 1.8:1 (p=0.381) during the period.
Stabilising rather than increasing incidence combined with the stable female/male ratio are indicative of non-fluctuating environmental factors in a geographical area otherwise characterised by lack of vitamin D effective sun exposure. The rising prevalence of MS could result from improved survival and follow-up methodology.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25714916 View in PubMed
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Accessibility to air travel correlates strongly with increasing melanoma incidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16510
Source
Melanoma Res. 2006 Feb;16(1):77-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Yolanda Z Agredano
Joanna L Chan
Ranch C Kimball
Alexa B Kimball
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California, USA.
Source
Melanoma Res. 2006 Feb;16(1):77-81
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft
Comparative Study
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Holidays - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Income - statistics & numerical data
Melanoma - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Sunlight
Travel - statistics & numerical data
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
As the cost of air travel has decreased substantially in the USA and Europe over the past few decades, leisure travel to vacation destinations during the winter months has expanded significantly. This trend has probably increased the incidence of significant ultraviolet radiation exposure and sunburn in a broader population who could not previously afford this kind of travel. The purpose of this study was to analyse the correlation between increasing accessibility to air travel and melanoma incidence. This ecological study surveyed air travel patterns and melanoma incidence over the past three decades. Melanoma age-adjusted incidence was obtained from the United States Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results 9 Registry Database, 1975-2000, and the Cancer Registry of Norway, 1965-2000. United States mean inflation-adjusted airfare prices for four airports linked to leisure destinations (Miami, Los Angeles, San Diego, Phoenix) were compared with melanoma incidence. Parallel analyses were performed using annual domestic passenger-kilometres and melanoma incidence in Norway. Declining United States leisure-specific airfares corresponded strongly with increasing melanoma incidence (r = 0.96, r = 0.92, P
PubMed ID
16432460 View in PubMed
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The actinic cheilitis of hereditary polymorphic light eruption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247132
Source
Arch Dermatol. 1979 Jun;115(6):699-702
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1979
Author
A R Birt
G R Hogg
Source
Arch Dermatol. 1979 Jun;115(6):699-702
Date
Jun-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cheilitis - etiology - pathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Photosensitivity Disorders - genetics - pathology
Sunlight
Abstract
Sixty-four North American Indians with hereditary polymorphic light eruption (HPLE), or a family history of HPLE, had chronic, recurrent, exudative, and exfoliative cheilitis. Fifty-two had the cheilitis by the age of 10 years. Microscopically, the epithelium was either thickened, or thinned and covered by a thick crust. The dermis had a dense infiltration of inflammatory cells, mostly lymphocytes and plasma cells. The condition was not premalignant. The HPLE has to be differentiated from the chronic actinic cheilitis caused by long exposure to sunlight with out any element of hypersensitivity. The latter is potentially premalignant. Chronic recurrent actinic cheilitis associated with hereditary polymorphic light eruption appears to be a specific characteristic of photosensitivity occurring in American Indians. Plasma cell infiltration is not specific for either type of cheilitis.
PubMed ID
453870 View in PubMed
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Actinic prurigo: clinical features and prognosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223861
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 1992 May;26(5 Pt 1):683-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
P R Lane
D J Hogan
M J Martel
B. Reeder
J. Irvine
Author Affiliation
Division of Dermatology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 1992 May;26(5 Pt 1):683-92
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Photosensitivity Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prognosis
Prurigo - diagnosis - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Sunlight - adverse effects
Abstract
Actinic prurigo, an idiopathic familial photodermatosis, has been described in Amerindians in Manitoba, Canada, as well as in the United States, Mexico, and South America.
Our purpose was to describe the clinical features and prognosis of actinic prurigo in Amerindians in Saskatchewan, Canada.
Clinical examinations, questionnaires, phototesting, and laboratory tests were used.
We present a series of 93 Amerindian patients. The face is the most commonly involved area. A hereditary tendency, cheilitis, and pruritus are prominent features. One third of patients report some lesions, often minor, during the winter. The majority of patients phototested were sensitive to ultraviolet A light.
We find the age of onset of actinic prurigo to be the most important feature in determining the type of eruption and the prognosis for the patient. In general the younger ages of onset (up to 20 years of age) are associated with cheilitis and more acute eruptions and are more likely to improve over 5 years. Those who develop actinic prurigo as adults (21 years of age and older) tend to have a milder and more persistent dermatosis.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Acad Dermatol. 1997 Mar;36(3 Pt 1):504-59091504
PubMed ID
1583166 View in PubMed
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445 records – page 1 of 45.