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Aboriginal suicide in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210445
Source
Percept Mot Skills. 1996 Dec;83(3 Pt 2):1202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
D. Lester
Author Affiliation
Psychology Program, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona 08240-0195, USA.
Source
Percept Mot Skills. 1996 Dec;83(3 Pt 2):1202
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
American Native Continental Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Incidence
Risk factors
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
PubMed ID
9017732 View in PubMed
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Absolute risk of suicide after first hospital contact in mental disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130761
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2011 Oct;68(10):1058-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Merete Nordentoft
Preben Bo Mortensen
Carsten Bøcker Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen, Denmark. mn@dadlnet.dk
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2011 Oct;68(10):1058-64
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Sex Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Estimates of lifetime risk of suicide in mental disorders were based on selected samples with incomplete follow-up.
To estimate, in a national cohort, the absolute risk of suicide within 36 years after the first psychiatric contact.
Prospective study of incident cases followed up for as long as 36 years. Median follow-up was 18 years.
Individual data drawn from Danish longitudinal registers.
A total of 176,347 persons born from January 1, 1955, through December 31, 1991, were followed up from their first contact with secondary mental health services after 15 years of age until death, emigration, disappearance, or the end of 2006. For each participant, 5 matched control individuals were included.
Absolute risk of suicide in percentage of individuals up to 36 years after the first contact.
Among men, the absolute risk of suicide (95% confidence interval [CI]) was highest for bipolar disorder, (7.77%; 6.01%-10.05%), followed by unipolar affective disorder (6.67%; 5.72%-7.78%) and schizophrenia (6.55%; 5.85%-7.34%). Among women, the highest risk was found among women with schizophrenia (4.91%; 95% CI, 4.03%-5.98%), followed by bipolar disorder (4.78%; 3.48%-6.56%). In the nonpsychiatric population, the risk was 0.72% (95% CI, 0.61%-0.86%) for men and 0.26% (0.20%-0.35%) for women. Comorbid substance abuse and comorbid unipolar affective disorder significantly increased the risk. The co-occurrence of deliberate self-harm increased the risk approximately 2-fold. Men with bipolar disorder and deliberate self-harm had the highest risk (17.08%; 95% CI, 11.19%-26.07%).
This is the first analysis of the absolute risk of suicide in a total national cohort of individuals followed up from the first psychiatric contact, and it represents, to our knowledge, the hitherto largest sample with the longest and most complete follow-up. Our estimates are lower than those most often cited, but they are still substantial and indicate the continuous need for prevention of suicide among people with mental disorders.
PubMed ID
21969462 View in PubMed
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Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2011 Aug;46(8):753-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Tanya Jukkala
Ilkka Henrik Mäkinen
Author Affiliation
Baltic and East European Graduate School, Södertörn University, 141 89, Huddinge, Sweden. tanya.jukkala@sh.se
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2011 Aug;46(8):753-65
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude
Demography
Ethics
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Religion
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicide - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Attitudes concerning the acceptability of suicide have been emphasized as being important for understanding why levels of suicide mortality vary in different societies across the world. While Russian suicide mortality levels are among the highest in the world, not much is known about attitudes to suicide in Russia. This study aims to obtain a greater understanding about the levels and correlates of suicide acceptance in Russia.
Data from a survey of 1,190 Muscovites were analysed using logistic regression techniques. Suicide acceptance was examined among respondents in relation to social, economic and demographic factors as well as in relation to attitudes towards other moral questions.
The majority of interviewees (80%) expressed condemnatory attitudes towards suicide, although men were slightly less condemning. The young, the higher educated, and the non-religious were more accepting of suicide (OR > 2). However, the two first-mentioned effects disappeared when controlling for tolerance, while a positive effect of lower education on suicide acceptance appeared. When controlling for other independent variables, no significant effects were found on suicide attitudes by gender, one's current family situation, or by health-related or economic problems.
The most important determinants of the respondents' attitudes towards suicide were their tolerance regarding other moral questions and their religiosity. More tolerant views, in general, also seemed to explain the more accepting views towards suicide among the young and the higher educated. Differences in suicide attitudes between the sexes seemed to be dependent on differences in other factors rather than on gender per se. Suicide attitudes also seemed to be more affected by one's earlier experiences in terms of upbringing and socialization than by events and processes later in life.
PubMed ID
21110001 View in PubMed
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Acute influence of alcohol, THC or central stimulants on violent suicide: A Swedish population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258141
Source
J Forensic Sci. 2014 Mar;59(2):436-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Lena Lundholm
Ingemar Thiblin
Bo Runeson
Anders Leifman
Anna Fugelstad
Source
J Forensic Sci. 2014 Mar;59(2):436-40
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology
Asphyxia - mortality
Central Nervous System Depressants - blood
Central Nervous System Stimulants - blood
Dronabinol - blood
Drowning - mortality
Ethanol - blood
Female
Forensic Psychiatry
Forensic Toxicology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neck Injuries - mortality
Poisoning - mortality
Registries
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Wounds, Gunshot - mortality
Wounds, Penetrating - mortality
Young Adult
Abstract
Alcohol and substance abuse in general is a risk factor for suicide, but very little is known about the acute effect in relation to suicide method. Based on information from 18,894 medico-legal death investigations, including toxicological findings and manner of death, did the present study investigate whether acute influence of alcohol, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), or central stimulants (amphetamine and cocaine) was related to the use of a violent suicide method, in comparison with the nonviolent method self-poisoning and alcohol-/illicit drug-negative suicide decedents. Multivariate analysis was conducted, and the results revealed that acute influence of THC was related to using the violent suicide method–– jumping from a height (RR 1.62; 95% CI 1.01–2.41). Alcohol intoxication was not related to any violent method, while the central stimulant-positive suicide decedent had a higher, albeit not significant, risk of several violent methods. The study contributes with elucidating suicide methods in relation to acute intoxication.
PubMed ID
24745078 View in PubMed
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Adolescent development and youth suicide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222221
Source
Suicide Life Threat Behav. 1993;23(4):359-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
H M Aro
M J Marttunen
J K Lönnqvist
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Mental Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Suicide Life Threat Behav. 1993;23(4):359-65
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cause of Death
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Personality Development
Sex Factors
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The adolescent years, being a period of unique developmental changes, are of great interest in understanding suicidal behavior. The occurrence of completed suicide by age in 1-year age groups in adolescence and young adulthood was studied via official Finnish mortality statistics and the population statistics. Suicide rates increased sharply by age during adolescence, starting somewhat earlier among boys than among girls. During the periods of rapidly rising and high suicide rates in the 1970s and 1980s among boys, the increase in suicide rates started at a younger age than during a spell of lower rates in the 1960s.
PubMed ID
8310469 View in PubMed
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Adolescent girls in need of protection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245887
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 1980 Apr;50(2):264-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1980
Author
J A Byles
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 1980 Apr;50(2):264-78
Date
Apr-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child Abuse
Child Welfare
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - rehabilitation
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Ontario
Prisons
Residential Treatment
Runaway Behavior
Suicide - psychology
Abstract
This descriptive study of 120 girls removed temporarily from parental care during early adolescence raises questions regarding the efficiency and effectiveness of current intervention strategies. The findings suggest that clinical and legal efforts on behalf of girls such as these, who have been victims of neglect, deprivation, and abuse, are likely to remain unsatisfactory in the absence of a broad societal commitment to the needs and rights of children.
PubMed ID
7361875 View in PubMed
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Adverse childhood experiences and suicidal behavior of adolescent psychiatric inpatients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122157
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2013 Jan;22(1):13-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Reetta Isohookana
Kaisa Riala
Helinä Hakko
Pirkko Räsänen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, 90014, Oulu, Finland. reettais@paju.oulu.fi
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2013 Jan;22(1):13-22
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Child
Cohort Studies
Domestic Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Inpatients - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Odds Ratio
Parents - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The present study examines the association of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) to suicidal behavior and mortality in 508 Finnish adolescents (aged 12-17 years) who required acute psychiatric hospitalization between April 2001 and March 2006. The Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children Present and Lifetime (K-SADS-PL) and the European Addiction Severity Index (EuropASI) were used to obtain information about ACEs, adolescents' suicidal behavior and psychiatric diagnoses. The cases of death were obtained from Statistics Finland. The results of our study indicated that, among girls, exposure to sexual abuse statistically significantly increased the risk of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) (OR, 1.8; 95 % CI, 1.0-3.2) and suicide attempts (OR, 2.3; 95 % CI, 1.0-4.5). The cumulative number of ACEs was also associated with an increased risk of NSSI (OR, 1.2; 95 % CI, 1.0- 1.4) and suicide attempts (OR, 1.2; 95 % CI, 1.0-1.4) in girls. Among all deceased adolescents, ACEs were most notable among those who had died due to accidents and injuries. Gender differences in the types of ACEs were noted and discussed.
PubMed ID
22842795 View in PubMed
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Affective disorders and completed suicide by self-poisoning, trend of using antidepressants as a method of self-poisoning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290994
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2017 09; 255:360-366
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2017
Author
Sanna Löfman
Helinä Hakko
Arja Mainio
Pirkko Riipinen
Author Affiliation
University of Oulu, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, P.O.Box 5000, 90014 Oulu, Finland; Oulu University Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, PL 26, 90029 OYS, Oulu, Finland. Electronic address: sanna.lofman@student.oulu.fi.
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2017 09; 255:360-366
Date
09-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - poisoning
Bipolar Disorder - drug therapy - psychology
Depressive Disorder, Major - drug therapy - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - drug therapy - psychology
Poisoning - psychology
Suicide - psychology - trends
Abstract
The aim of this research was to study the role and trend of antidepressant use as a method of suicide in completed self-poisoning suicides in patients with affective disorders during a 23-year follow up period. The data consisted of 483 completed self-poisoning suicides from 1988 to 2011 in the province of Oulu in Northern Finland (286 men and 197 women). Of the self-poisoning victims, 26.9% (n=130) had hospital-treated unipolar depression and 3.1% (n=15) hospital-treated bipolar disorder. Further, 53.8% (n=70) of those with unipolar depression and 53.3% (n=8) of those with bipolar depression died by suicide using antidepressants. During the 23-year follow-up period, the proportion of those using antidepressants doubled among all self-poisoning victims of suicide. A significant decline was observed in the use of tricyclic antidepressants in self- poisoning suicides while a linear increase was found in the use of SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) and other antidepressants. During recent years one in five self-poisoning suicides involved the use of antiepileptics. A limitation of our study was that the psychiatric diagnoses only include hospital inpatient episodes. In conclusion, the use of new antidepressants has increased rapidly, but the risk of their use in self-poisoning suicide has perhaps been underestimated.
PubMed ID
28628870 View in PubMed
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[Age analysis and medico-psychological features of suicides among residents of St. Petersburg].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184826
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2003;11:130-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
V Kh Khavinson
I L Rybnikova
Author Affiliation
St. Petersburg Institute of Bioregulation and Gerontology, 3, Dynamo Prospect, 197110, St. Petersburg, Russia.
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2003;11:130-4
Date
2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Russia
Suicide - psychology
Abstract
On the basis of the epidemiological analysis of many years' data we have revealed the age-dependant and medical-psychological peculiarities of suicides in various social and age groups of the St. Petersburg population and grounded the ways for improving suicide prevention and crisis services to elderly and older persons.
PubMed ID
12820533 View in PubMed
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Age-related response to redeemed antidepressants measured by completed suicide in older adults: a nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258597
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2014 Jan;22(1):25-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Annette Erlangsen
Yeates Conwell
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2014 Jan;22(1):25-33
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To examine if the suicide rate of older adults prescribed antidepressants varies with age and to assess the proportion of older adults who died by suicide that had recently been prescribed antidepressants.
A population-based cohort study using a nationwide linkage of individual-level records was conducted on all persons aged 50+ living in Denmark during 1996-2006 (1,215,524 men and 1,343,568 women). Suicide rates by treatment status were calculated using data on all antidepressant prescriptions redeemed at pharmacies.
Individual-level data covered 9,354,620 and 10,720,639 person-years for men and women, respectively. Men aged 50-59 who received antidepressants had a mean suicide rate of 185 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 160-211) per 100,000, whereas for those aged 80+ the rate was 119 (95% CI: 91-146). For women, the corresponding values were 82 (95% CI: 70-94) and 28 (95% CI: 20-35). Logistic regression showed a 2% and 3% decline in the rate for men and women, respectively, considered in treatment with antidepressants, with each additional year of age. An opposite trend was found for persons not in treatment. Fewer persons aged 80+ dying by suicide had received antidepressant prescriptions during the last months of life than younger persons.
An age-dependent decline in suicide rate for antidepressant recipients was identified. One reason could be that older adults respond better to antidepressants than younger age groups. Still, the increasing gap with age between estimated prevalence of depression and antidepressant prescription rate in persons dying by suicide underscores the need for assessment of depression in the oldest old.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23567434 View in PubMed
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448 records – page 1 of 45.